Liberty Park (Manhattan)

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Coordinates: 40°42′40″N 74°00′51″W / 40.711067°N 74.014278°W / 40.711067; -74.014278

Rebuilding of the
World Trade Center
One World Trade Center (construction)
Two World Trade Center
Three World Trade Center
Four World Trade Center
Five World Trade Center
Seven World Trade Center
Liberty Park
National September 11 Memorial & Museum
Performing Arts Center
Transportation Hub
Vehicular Security Center
Westfield World Trade Center
Layout of the park, with the St. Nicholas Church at left and pedestrian bridge at right

Liberty Park is an elevated public park under construction in the new World Trade Center in New York City, overlooking the World Trade Center site.

It began construction in 2013 when the Vehicular Security Center was completed, and it will be completed between 2015[1] and early 2017. The park, when open, will overlook the National September 11 Memorial & Museum and will have a connection to the Liberty Street Bridge.[2] The St. Nicholas Church, destroyed in the September 11 attacks, will be rebuilt in the park, with a new design by Santiago Calatrava, who designed most of the reconstructed site.[3] The park, located 25 feet (7.6 m) above Liberty Street, is just a little more than 1 acre (4,000 m2) in area.[4]

Liberty Park is located on top of the Vehicular Security Center, the latter of which protects the site against unauthorized vehicles. [5] About US$50,000,000 was allocated to the park's construction by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in December 2013.[6]

Features[edit]

It is planned to have a capacity of 750 people and will be the roof of the Vehicular Security Center. A "living wall" will be located on the Liberty Street facade, which would be "essentially a vertical landscape, roughly 300 feet long and more than 20 feet high, made of periwinkle, Japanese spurge, winter creeper, sedge and Baltic ivy.” A walkway from the pedestrian bridge will curve along the park; egresses will be three stairways, the pedestrian bridge, and a straight ramp down to Greenwich Street. Of these exits, a wide, "monumental" staircase would be located parallel to Greenwich Street and directly behind the church. There will be wood benches and a small amphitheater-like elevated space at the West Street end of the park. Finally, a "continuous overlook" along much of Liberty Street would be provided in addition to "a gently curving balcony" at the church's foot. [3]

Santiago Calatrava is designing the new St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in the park. His plans were influenced by the churches of Hagia Sophia and the Church of the Holy Savior Istanbul.[7]The site for the new church is east of the original site at 155 Cedar Street.[8] Construction of the new church is scheduled to begin in early 2014.[9]

Five World Trade Center was planned to be built adjacent to the southern edge of the VSC and Liberty Park on the site of the former Deutsche Bank Building.[10] As of 2014, the Port Authority does not plan to proceed with construction of the building until tenants are found.[11]

Location of The Sphere[edit]

Main article: The Sphere

The Sphere, a large metallic sculpture by German sculptor Fritz Koenig, once stood in the middle of Austin J. Tobin Plaza, the area between the World Trade Center towers in Manhattan was recovered from the rubble of the Twin Towers after the September 11 attacks in 2001. The artwork faced an uncertain fate, and it was dismantled into its components. Although it remained structurally intact, it had been visibly damaged by debris from the airliners that were crashed into the buildings and from the collapsing skyscrapers themselves. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), which owns The Sphere, is considering placing the sculpture in Liberty Park, which will be located between the 90 West Street building and the World Trade Center Memorial site. Construction on Liberty Park did not start until 2013, so a location was needed to place The Sphere until Liberty Park is completed. As of February 2011, PANYNJ had not made an official final decision on where to place the sculpture once Battery Park construction commences, forcing the sculpture to move. Until Liberty Park opens, the Sphere will go into storage.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rosenfield, Karissa (November 26, 2013). "Elevated Park Planned for World Trade Center". ArchDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014. 
  2. ^ Fishbein, Rebecca (November 20, 2013). "WTC Getting Elevated "Liberty Park" With View Of 9/11 Memorial". Gothamist. Retrieved April 24, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "First Look: Santiago Calatrava’s Design for St. Nicholas Church". Tribeca Citizen. October 29, 2013. Retrieved April 24, 2014. 
  4. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 20, 2013). "Elevated Park at Trade Center Site Comes Into View". The New York Times. Retrieved April 24, 2014. 
  5. ^ "In a Shift, WTC Residents Like What They Hear on Security". Downtown Express. April 24, 2014. Retrieved April 24, 2014. 
  6. ^ Budin, Jeremiah (December 13, 2013). "Liberty Park Funding Approved by Port Authority". Curbed NY. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  7. ^ Dunlop, David W., "Church Near Trade Center to Echo Landmarks of East", New York Times, October 13, 2013
  8. ^ Dunlap, David (October 14, 2011). "Way Is Cleared to Rebuild Greek Orthodox Church Lost on 9/11". The New York Times. 
  9. ^ http://www.goarch.org/news/stnicholas-nationalshrine-11132013
  10. ^ "10 Years After 9/11, Deutsche Bank Tower Vanishes". New York Times. 2011-01-12. Retrieved 2014-06-24. 
  11. ^ "World Trade Center museum deal may lead to land sale: sources". Reuters. 2012-09-12. Retrieved 2013-09-12. 
  12. ^ Shapiro, Julie. "9/11 Family Members Start Petition to Save World Trade Center Sphere". DNAinfo New York Associates. Retrieved February 28, 2011. 
  13. ^ Chung, Jen. "World Trade Center Sphere's Uncertain Fate Worries 9/11 Families". Gothamist. Retrieved February 28, 2011.