Life After You (Daughtry song)

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"Life After You"
Single by Daughtry
from the album Leave This Town
B-side "Life After You (Acoustic)"
Released November 10, 2009
Format CD, digital
Recorded September 2008 – March 2009 in Los Angeles, California
Genre Pop rock
Length 3:26
Label RCA
Writer(s) Chris Daughtry, Chad Kroeger, Joey Moi, Brett James
Daughtry singles chronology
"No Surprise"
(2009)
"Life After You"
(2009)
"September"
(2010)

"Life After You" is a song by the band Daughtry, released as the second single from their album Leave This Town. Chris Daughtry wrote the song with Nickelback vocalist Chad Kroeger.[1] Two versions of the original version exist: an album version and a music video version with the crowd cheering at the end. "Life After You" received positive reviews from music critics and was a success in most of the charts.

Background[edit]

Chad Kroeger offered "Life After You" to Chris Daughtry while he was still on tour with Bon Jovi.[2] Daughtry was not sure if the song suited the band, but a year later, unable to get the song out of his head, he wrote the bridge for the song.[2] It was included in his album Leave This Town and was released as the second single from the album.

Track listing[edit]

  1. Life After You – 3:26
  2. Life After You (Acoustic) – 3:32

Promotion[edit]

The band performed the song live at the American Music Awards on November 22, 2009.

The song was also performed by the band at halftime during the Oakland Raiders vs. Dallas Cowboys Thanksgiving football game.

The song has also been used for American Idol season 9.

Music video[edit]

Daughtry released the music video for "Life After You" on October 15, 2009.[3]

Summary[edit]

The video begins with Chris in a hotel room trying to call his wife who does not pick up. He then leaves the hotel and gets on a bus and soon winds up in a bar. He then gets up and goes into the back to a warehouse where the rest of the band is waiting for him and they start performing. He then sees his wife and he celebrates with the other members. He is then seen talking with her on the phone and after he hangs up, he and the band go onto the stage where the audience is waiting. His wife's face is never shown.

Chart performance[edit]

"Life After You" debuted at number 66 on the Billboard Hot 100 the chart week of December 19, 2009, and has since moved up to number 36. It has already reached number 5 on Adult Pop Songs (formerly known as the Adult Top 40), making it the band's seventh consecutive top-ten hit there. It has spent a total of 62 weeks at number 1 on the Rock Digital Songs chart, making it the longest song at number 1, beating their own record of 23 weeks set with "It's Not Over".[4] The single had sold 890,000 digital downloads as of January 2011.[5]

On the issue dated February 27, 2010, "Life After You" became the group's seventh top-forty hit on the Canadian Hot 100, peaking at number thirty-nine, later rising to thirty-four.

On the Billboard Hot 100, Daughtry scored their seventh top-40 single with this song.

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (2009-2010) Peak
position
Canadian Hot 100[6] 34
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[6][7] 36
U.S. Adult Contemporary (Billboard)[6][8] 4
U.S. Adult Pop Songs (Billboard)[6] 4
U.S. Pop Songs (Billboard)[6] 19

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2010) Position
Canadian Hot 100[9][not in citation given] 99
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[10] 66

References[edit]

  1. ^ Life After You Songfacts
  2. ^ a b Fred Bronson (March 5, 2013). "Top 100 'American Idol' Hits of All Time". Billboard. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  3. ^ http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid10172910001?bctid=44831247001
  4. ^ http://www.daughtryofficial.com
  5. ^ Idol Chatter 01-19-2011
  6. ^ a b c d e "Life After You". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2011-11-16. 
  7. ^ Daughtry Chart History - Hot 100. Billboard.com
  8. ^ Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks
  9. ^ "Charts Year End: Canadian Hot 100". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 
  10. ^ "2010 Year-End Hot 100 Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2011-11-16. 

External links[edit]