Ligularia dentata

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Ligularia dentata
Ligularia dentata 1.jpg
summer ragwort
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Senecioneae
Genus: Ligularia
Species: L. dentata
Binomial name
Ligularia dentata
(A.Gray) H.Hara
Synonyms

Senecio clivorum Maxim.
Erythrochaete dentata A. Gray
Ligularia clivorum Maxim.
Source: NRCS,[1] BMG[2]

Ligularia dentata (summer ragwort or leopard plant) is a species of flowering plant in the genus Ligularia and the family Asteraceae, native to China and Japan.

Description[edit]

It is a robust herbaceous perennial growing to 1–1.5 m (3–5 ft) tall by 1 m (3 ft) wide.[3] The dark green leaves are large, long-stalked, leathery, cordate-based, and very rounded, with serrated edges (hence the Latin dentata meaning "toothed")[4] . Orange-yellow daisy-like composite flowers bloom on thick red, mostly leafless stalks, rising above the foliage in early summer.

Cultivation[edit]

Ligularia dentata is grown as an ornamental plant, chosen as much for its bold foliage as its flowers.[5] It is used as a round-leaved accent plant or massed planting in moist sun and partial shade garden settings, and in containers. Cultivars include 'Desdemona' and 'Othello'. Selections with cream color spotted foliage (polka dots) are also grown.

Ligularia dentata 'Desdemona' - cultivar foliage.
Ligularia dentata, in massed natural landscaping.

Toxicity[edit]

Ligularia dentata contains tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). "PLANTS Profile, Ligularia dentata" (HTML). The PLANTS Database. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  2. ^ Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem. "Details for: Ligularia dentata" (HTML). Euro+Med PlantBase. Freie Universität Berlin. Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  3. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  4. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315. 
  5. ^ MBG . accessed 11.30.2011
  6. ^ Fu, P.P., Yang, Y.C., Xia, Q., Chou, M.C., Cui, Y.Y., Lin G., "Pyrrolizidine alkaloids-tumorigenic components in Chinese herbal medicines and dietary supplements", Journal of Food and Drug Analysis, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2002, pp. 198-211[1]

External links[edit]