Lilith Saintcrow

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Lilith Saintcrow
Born 1976
New Mexico
Pen name Anna Beguine, Lili St. Crow
Occupation novelist
Nationality United States
Genres paranormal romance, urban fantasy, young adult
Children 2

www.lilithsaintcrow.com

Lilith Saintcrow is an American author of urban fantasy, historical fantasy, paranormal romance and steampunk novels.[1] Saintcrow was born in New Mexico. She currently resides in Vancouver, WA.

Works (as Lilith Saintcrow)[edit]

The Watcher Series[edit]

  • Dark Watcher (2004)
  • Storm Watcher (2005)
  • Fire Watcher (2006)
  • Cloud Watcher (2006)
  • Mindhealer (2008)

The Society Series[edit]

  • The Society (2005)
  • Hunter, Healer (2005)

Novels not in series[edit]

  • Steelflower (2007)
  • The Demon's Librarian (2009)
  • The Damnation Affair (2012)

Dante Valentine[edit]

  • Working for the Devil (2005)
  • Dead Man Rising (2006)
  • The Devil's Right Hand (2007)
  • Saint City Sinners (2007)
  • To Hell and Back (2008)

Jill Kismet[edit]

  • Night Shift (2008)
  • Hunter's Prayer (2008)
  • Redemption Alley (2009)
  • Flesh Circus (2009)
  • Heaven's Spite (2010)
  • Angel Town (November 1, 2011)

The Bannon and Clare series (Steampunk)[edit]

  • The Iron Wyrm Affair (2012)
  • The Red Plague Affair (2013)
  • The Ripper Affair (August 2014)

Romance of the Arquitaine (Historical Fantasy)[edit]

  • The Hedgewitch Queen (2011)
  • The Bandit King (2012)

Works (under pseudonym)[edit]

Strange Angels[edit]

  • (under the name Lili St. Crow)
    • Strange Angels (2009)
    • Betrayals (2009)
    • Jealousy (2010)
    • Defiance (2011)
    • Reckoning (November 1, 2011)


The Keeper Books[edit]

  • (under the pseudonym Anna Beguine)
    • Smoke (2007)
    • Mirror (2007)

Short Stories[edit]

She has also published several short stories [1] and the free online serial Selene[2] (with characters from her Dante Valentine series).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albright, Mary Ann (30 July 2010). "Vampire romance novels suck in readers". The Columbian. Retrieved 10 August 2010. 

External links[edit]