Lillian Ngoyi-class environmental inshore patrol vessels

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
South African environmental patrol vessel Ruth First, 2nd of the three vessels in the Lillian Ngoyi class.
Class overview
Operators: South Africa
In commission: 2004-
Planned: 3
Completed: 3
Active: 3
General characteristics
Displacement: 353 metric tons
Length: 46.8 m (154 ft)
Beam: 8.11 m (26.6 ft)
Depth: 2.9 m (9.5 ft)
Propulsion: 2 x 2,770 kilowatts (3,710 shp)
1 x 75 kilowatts (101 shp) bow thruster
Speed: 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph)
Endurance: 14 days, 2,500 nautical miles (4,600 km; 2,900 mi)

South Africa operates three Lillian Ngoyi class environmental patrol vessels, based on the Damen Stan 4708 design.[1] The vessels are the Lillian Ngoyi, Ruth First and Victoria Mxenge.[2][3]

The vessels were constructed in South Africa by Farocean Marine.[3] The United States Coast Guard later decided to construct several dozen Sentinel Class cutters, also based on the Damen Stan patrol vessel 4708 design, citing the success of the South African vessels.[1]

vessel launched notes
Lillian Ngoyi 2004-11 Named after anti-apartheid activist Lillian Ngoyi.[4][5]
Ruth First 2005-05 Named after anti-apartheid activist Ruth First.[5]
Victoria Mxenge 2005 Named after anti-apartheid activist Victoria Mxenge.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Parent Craft –DamenStan Patrol 4708". United States Coast Guard. 2008-09-30. 
  2. ^ "Cape marine protection gets a boost". The Independent Online. 2007-05-28. Archived from the original on 2009-10-07. Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  3. ^ a b Leon Engelbrecht (2010-02-28). "Fact file: Lilian Ngoyi class environmental inshore patrol vessels". Defence Web. 
  4. ^ Richard Davies (2004-11-16). "SA christens first new environmental vessel". Independent Online. Retrieved 2011-12-04. A sprinkling of holy water and a spray of champagne marked the naming of the first of South Africa's four new environmental protection vessels, the Lilian Ngoyi, in Cape Town harbour on Tuesday.  mirror
  5. ^ a b c "SA's marine protection vessels". SAinfo. 2005-05-20. Retrieved 2011-12-04. The vessels, designed in the Netherlands, are specifically built for local and international conditions. They are 47 metres long and eight metres wide, and can reach a top speed of almost 40km per hour and a cruising speed of 30km per hour - twice the speed needed to haul in poachers.  mirror