Lincoln Park, New Jersey

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Lincoln Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Lincoln Park
Lincoln Park highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Lincoln Park highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lincoln Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lincoln Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°55′26″N 74°18′15″W / 40.923751°N 74.304235°W / 40.923751; -74.304235Coordinates: 40°55′26″N 74°18′15″W / 40.923751°N 74.304235°W / 40.923751; -74.304235[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated March 11, 1922
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor David A. Runfeldt (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Perry Mayers[4]
 • Clerk Cynthia L. Sloane[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 6.910 sq mi (17.898 km2)
 • Land 6.380 sq mi (16.525 km2)
 • Water 0.530 sq mi (1.373 km2)  7.67%
Area rank 244th of 566 in state
22nd of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 180 ft (50 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 10,521
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 10,524
 • Rank 233rd of 566 in state
18th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 1,649.0/sq mi (636.7/km2)
 • Density rank 318th of 566 in state
16th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07035[13][14]
Area code(s) 862/973
FIPS code 3402740290[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885277[17]
Website http://www.lincolnpark.org

Lincoln Park is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 10,521,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 409 (-3.7%) from the 10,930 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 48 (-0.4%) from the 10,978 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Lincoln Park was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1922, from portions of Pequannock Township. The borough was reincorporated on February 26, 1925.[19]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Lincoln Park as its 5th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[20]

Geography[edit]

Lincoln Park is located at 40°55′26″N 74°18′15″W / 40.923751°N 74.304235°W / 40.923751; -74.304235 (40.923751,-74.304235). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 6.910 square miles (17.898 km2), of which, 6.380 square miles (16.525 km2) of it is land and 0.530 square miles (1.373 km2) of it (7.67%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,831
1940 2,186 19.4%
1950 3,376 54.4%
1960 6,048 79.1%
1970 9,034 49.4%
1980 8,806 −2.5%
1990 10,978 24.7%
2000 10,930 −0.4%
2010 10,521 −3.7%
Est. 2012 10,524 [11] 0.0%
Population sources:
1930[21] 1930-1990[22]
2000[23][24] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,521 people, 4,001 households, and 2,593 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,649.0 per square mile (636.7 /km2). There were 4,145 housing units at an average density of 649.7 per square mile (250.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 86.26% (9,075) White, 1.83% (193) Black or African American, 0.20% (21) Native American, 7.38% (776) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.26% (238) from other races, and 2.07% (218) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.59% (1,009) of the population.[8]

There were 4,001 households, of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.09.[8]

In the borough, 18.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 32.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.0 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $87,530 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,142) and the median family income was $98,709 (+/- $5,538). Males had a median income of $71,440 (+/- $4,204) versus $56,761 (+/- $3,088) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,807 (+/- $2,824). About 4.3% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[25]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 10,930 people, 4,026 households, and 2,705 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,624.2 people per square mile (627.1/km2). There were 4,110 housing units at an average density of 610.8 per square mile (235.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.07% White, 1.75% African American, 0.12% Native American, 5.29% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.30% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.79% of the population.[23][24]

There were 4,026 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.2% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.8% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.14.[23][24]

In the borough the population was spread out with 20.3% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 33.7% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[23][24]

The median income for a household in the borough was $69,050, and the median income for a family was $77,307. Males had a median income of $51,651 versus $36,292 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,389. About 1.9% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[23][24]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Borough of Lincoln Park is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) Plan F system of municipal government, implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1971.[26] The governing body consists of a Mayor and a seven-member Borough Council, with three council seats elected at-large and four from wards, with all positions chosen in partisan elections held in even-numbered years as part of the November general election. Each council member is elected to four-year terms on a staggered basis, with the three at-large seats and the mayoral seat up for election together and the four ward seats up two years later.[6][27]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Lincoln Park is Republican David A. Runfeldt, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2014.[28] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Raymond Kerwin (R; Ward III, 2016), Robert Cardillo (R; at-large, 2014), Gary Gemian (R; Ward I, 2016), Louis J. Pepe (R; at-large, 2014), Ellen Ross (R; Ward II, 2016), Ann Thompson (R; at-large, 2014) and James A. Wild (R; Ward IV, 2016).[27][29][30][31]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lincoln Park is located in the 11th Congressional District[32] and is part of New Jersey's 26th state legislative district.[9][33][34]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[35] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[36][37] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[38][39]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 26th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Pennacchio (R, Montville) and in the General Assembly by BettyLou DeCroce (R, Parsippany-Troy Hills) and Jay Webber (R, Morris Plains) and [40][41] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[42] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[43]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[44] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[45] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[46] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[47] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[48] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[49] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[50] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[51] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[52][45][53] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[54] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[55] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[45][56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,421 registered voters in Lincoln Park, of which 1,371 (21.4%) were registered as Democrats, 2,088 (32.5%) were registered as Republicans and 2,955 (46.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[57]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 53.2% of the vote here (2,745 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 44.8% (2,311 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (69 votes), among the 5,162 ballots cast by the borough's 6,711 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.9%.[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 56.9% of the vote here (2,767 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 42.1% (2,047 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (40 votes), among the 4,864 ballots cast by the borough's 6,635 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 73.3.[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 56.7% of the vote here (1,762 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 34.8% (1,081 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.3% (226 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (28 votes), among the 3,108 ballots cast by the borough's 6,518 registered voters, yielding a 47.7% turnout.[60]

Education[edit]

The Lincoln Park Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[61]) are Lincoln Park Elementary School[62] for grades K-4 (521 students) and Lincoln Park Middle School[63] for grades 5-8 (364 students).[64][65]

For grades 9-12, Lincoln Park public school students attend Boonton High School in Boonton as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Boonton Public Schools, with Lincoln Park students accounting for a majority of students at the high school.[66] The two districts have sought to sever the more than 50-year old relationship, citing cost savings that could be achieved by both districts and complaints by Lincoln Park that it is granted only one seat on the Boonton Public Schools' Board of Education. In April 2006, the Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Education rejected the request.[67] As of 2010-11 there were about 60 students from the borough attending the schools of the Morris County Vocational School District, which are the Morris County School of Technology in Denville, The Academy for Mathematics, Science, and Engineering in Rockaway at Morris Hills High School and the Academy for Law and Public Safety in Butler at Butler High School.[66]

Lincoln Park is home for The Craig School, a private coeducational day school serving students in third through twelfth grade. The school has an enrollment of 160 students split between the Lower School (grades 3-8), in Mountain Lakes, and the Upper School (grades 9-12), located in Lincoln Park.[68]

Media[edit]

Lincoln Park is served by New York City television stations. It is served by the newspapers The Star-Ledger, Daily Record and The Record

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Lincoln Park include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Borough of Lincoln Park. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Borough of Lincoln Park. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 121.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Lincoln Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lincoln Park borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lincoln Park borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lincoln Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 194. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  20. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  21. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  23. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Lincoln Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Lincoln Park borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  25. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Lincoln Park borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  26. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  27. ^ a b Mayor & Council, Borough of Lincoln Park. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  28. ^ Mayor Runfeldt's Page, Borough of Lincoln Park. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  29. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Lincoln Park. Accessed December 7, 2013.
  30. ^ Johnston. "Lincoln Park welcomes new council member, prepares for another 'tough economic time'", Suburban Trends, January 5, 2011. Accessed March 21, 2011. "Mayor David Runfeldt was again sworn into his elected position and Councilman Louis Pepe was voted in as council president for the second consecutive year. Both won during the June primary last year.... Councilman Robert Cardillo was sworn in and will be serving his first term. Cardillo, who was 33 when he ran in the June primary, will be succeeding former Councilwoman Janet Long, who was unable to clench a seat in the primary."
  31. ^ Morris County Manual 2013, p. 40. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  32. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  36. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  38. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  39. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  41. ^ District 26 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  42. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  45. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2014, Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  46. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  47. ^ David Scapicchio, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  48. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  49. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  50. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  51. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  52. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  53. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  54. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  55. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  56. ^ What is a Surrogate?, Morris County Surrogate Court. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  57. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  58. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  59. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  60. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  61. ^ Data for the Lincoln Park Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  62. ^ Lincoln Park Elementary School, Lincoln Park Public Schools. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  63. ^ Lincoln Park Middle School, Lincoln Park Public Schools. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  64. ^ Our Schools, Lincoln Park Public Schools. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  65. ^ New Jersey School Directory, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 17, 2013.
  66. ^ a b Lincoln Park School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 17, 2013. "Lincoln Park participates in a sending-receiving relationship with Boonton High School, which offers a comprehensive educational program for children in grades 9 through 12. The Lincoln Park School District sends approximately 285 students to Boonton High School. Approximately 60 high school age students attend The Academies of Morris County."
  67. ^ Commissioner of Education Decision, New Jersey Department of Education, April 25, 2006. Accessed January 29, 2008.
  68. ^ High School General Information, The Craig School. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  69. ^ Jim Kiick, database Football. Accessed August 19, 2007.
  70. ^ Carroll, Kathleen. "William Mitchell, inventor of Pop Rocks", The Record (Bergen County), July 30, 2004. Accessed May 3, 2011. "William A. Mitchell, a longtime Lincoln Park resident whose inventions included Pop Rocks candy, died Monday in a Stockton, Calif., retirement home. He was 92."
  71. ^ Abraham Ryerson, History Morris County, New Jersey, Volume II, Lewis Publishing Co., 1914. Accessed March 16, 2011.

External links[edit]