Linda Bartoshuk

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Linda May Bartoshuk (born 1938)[1] is an American psychologist. She is a Presidential Endowed Professor of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science at the University of Florida. She is an internationally known researcher specializing in the chemical senses of taste and smell.

Biography[edit]

Bartoshuk grew up in Aberdeen, South Dakota.[2] She received her B.A. from Carleton College and her PhD from Brown University.[3] Her research explores the genetic variations in taste perception and how taste perception affects overall health. Bartoshuk was the first to discover that burning mouth syndrome, a condition predominantly experienced by postmenopausal women, is caused by damage to the taste buds at the front of the tongue and is not a psychosomatic condition. She was employed at Yale University prior to accepting a position at the University of Florida in 2005. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995.[1] In 2003, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.[2]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Book of Members, 1780–2010: Chapter B". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved May 19, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "InterViews: Linda Bartoshuk". National Academy of Sciences. Retrieved May 19, 2011. 
  3. ^ "On Blue Tongues, Undergraduates, and Science: An Interview With Linda M. Bartoshuk". Education Resources Information Center. Retrieved May 19, 2011. 

External links[edit]