Lindsey Hunter

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Lindsey Hunter
Lindsey Hunter in 2009.jpeg
Hunter visits the White House in 2009 before the Chicago Bulls' game against the Washington Wizards.
Personal information
Born (1970-12-03) December 3, 1970 (age 43)
Utica, Mississippi
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Listed weight 195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school Murrah (Jackson, Mississippi)
College Alcorn State (1988–1989)
Jackson State (1990–1993)
NBA draft 1993 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10th overall
Selected by the Detroit Pistons
Pro career 1993–2010
Position Point guard
Number 1, 11, 10
Career history
As player:
19932000 Detroit Pistons
2000–2001 Milwaukee Bucks
2001–2002 Los Angeles Lakers
2002–2003 Toronto Raptors
20032008 Detroit Pistons
20082010 Chicago Bulls
As coach:
2012–2013 Phoenix Suns (asst.)
2013 Phoenix Suns
2013–2014 Golden State Warriors (asst.)
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points 7,956 (8.5 ppg)
Rebounds 2,021 (2.2 rpg)
Assists 2,506 (2.7 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Lindsey Benson Hunter, Jr. (born December 3, 1970) is an American former professional basketball player. He was a point guard in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1993 to 2010, spending most of his career with Detroit Pistons. He was also the interim head coach of the Phoenix Suns in 2013.

Basketball career[edit]

After playing basketball at Murrah High School in Jackson, Mississippi, alongside phenom James Robinson, Hunter enrolled at Alcorn State University, then transferred to Jackson State University after his freshman year. While playing for the Jackson State Tigers, he became arguably the school's highest profile athlete since the days of Walter Payton and Jackie Slater.

The Detroit Pistons had two first-round picks in the 1993 NBA Draft. They selected Hunter with the 10th pick and chose Tennessee guard Allan Houston with the 11th. Hunter spent most of his professional career playing with the Pistons organization. His first stint in Detroit lasted from 1993 to 2000 when he was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks for Billy Owens. He played with the Bucks for one season, before being sent to the Los Angeles Lakers in exchange for Greg Foster. Hunter was a contributor on the Lakers team that won the NBA championship in 2001–02.

Following that season, Hunter was dealt again (on draft night 2002), this time to the Toronto Raptors, along with the rights to Chris Jefferies, for Tracy Murray and Kareem Rush.[1] In August 2003, the Pistons re-acquired Hunter by sending Michael Curry to the Raptors.[2] He was traded to the Boston Celtics in February 2004 along with Chucky Atkins and Detroit's 2004 first-round draft pick for Mike James, in order to make the salary cap figures work out for the trade that brought Rasheed Wallace to the Pistons. Hunter never played a game for the Celtics; he was immediately released and re-signed by Detroit a week later.[3] Hunter and the Pistons went on to win the 2003–04 NBA championship. Hunter and the Pistons went back to the Finals in 2004-2005, but Detroit lost the series in seven games to the San Antonio Spurs.

On March 7, 2007, Hunter was suspended for ten games after testing positive for phentermine. He claimed he was using his wife's diet pills, which made him test positive for the banned substance.[4]

Hunter signed a one-year nonguaranteed contract with the Chicago Bulls on November 13, 2008.[5] On July 13, 2009, Hunter re-signed with the Bulls for the veteran minimum of $1.3 million. At age 39, Hunter was the oldest player active during the 2009–2010 NBA season—until the Bulls waived him on March 3, 2010 (to make room for Chris Richard).[6] Two days later, the Bulls hired him as a player development assistant.[7][8]

On August 28, 2012, Hunter signed with the Phoenix Suns as an assistant coach for player development.[9] After the Suns opened the season with a 13–28 record, Hunter was named Phoenix's interim head coach, replacing Alvin Gentry on January 20, 2013.[10] In his head coaching debut, Hunter led the Suns to a 106-96 victory over the Sacramento Kings.[11] In May 2013, Hunter was replaced by Jeff Hornacek. On September 18, 2013, Hunter joined the Golden State Warriors as an assistant coach.[12]

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1993–94 Detroit 82 26 26.5 .375 .333 .732 2.3 4.8 1.5 .1 10.3
1994–95 Detroit 42 26 22.5 .374 .333 .727 1.8 3.8 1.2 .2 7.5
1995–96 Detroit 80 48 26.7 .381 .405 .700 2.4 2.4 1.1 .2 8.5
1996–97 Detroit 82 76 36.9 .404 .355 .778 2.8 1.9 1.6 .3 14.2
1997–98 Detroit 71 67 35.3 .383 .321 .740 3.5 3.2 1.7 .1 12.1
1998–99 Detroit 49 49 35.8 .435 .386 .753 3.4 3.9 1.8 .2 11.9
1999–00 Detroit 82 82 35.6 .425 .432 .760 3.0 4.0 1.6 .3 12.7
2000–01 Milwaukee 82 5 24.4 .381 .373 .802 2.1 2.7 1.2 .1 10.1
2001–02 L.A. Lakers 82 47 19.7 .382 .380 .500 1.5 1.6 .8 .2 5.8
2002–03 Toronto 29 0 23.2 .351 .318 .723 2.0 2.4 1.2 .2 9.7
2003–04 Detroit 33 8 20.0 .343 .280 .625 2.0 2.6 1.2 .2 3.5
2004–05 Detroit 76 3 15.1 .358 .274 .793 1.6 1.7 .9 .2 3.8
2005–06 Detroit 30 1 11.8 .370 .256 .500 1.3 2.1 .6 .0 2.9
2006–07 Detroit 52 0 14.3 .385 .319 .909 .9 1.8 .7 .1 4.9
2007–08 Detroit 24 0 9.0 .344 .269 .778 .5 1.4 .5 .1 2.4
2008–09 Chicago 28 0 9.5 .329 .333 .600 .4 1.3 .7 .0 2.6
2009–10 Chicago 13 0 9.4 .167 .077 1.000 1.1 .7 .1 .0 1.0
Career 937 439 24.8 .388 .360 .746 2.2 2.7 1.2 .2 8.5

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1996 Detroit 2 0 18.0 .250 .250 .500 1.0 .5 .5 .0 3.0
1997 Detroit 5 5 40.2 .439 .414 .714 3.6 1.2 1.2 .2 15.0
1999 Detroit 5 5 36.0 .264 .273 1.000 3.0 2.4 1.4 .0 7.2
2000 Detroit 3 3 31.0 .313 .111 .667 2.3 1.7 1.7 .3 8.3
2001 Milwaukee 18 0 16.1 .242 .151 .727 1.7 1.9 .8 .2 3.6
2002 L.A. Lakers 18 0 7.3 .311 .276 .000 .4 .6 .1 .0 2.0
2004 Detroit 23 0 11.9 .292 .233 .917 1.4 .9 .8 .2 2.4
2005 Detroit 25 0 15.0 .319 .222 .727 1.6 1.6 .9 .3 3.8
2006 Detroit 18 0 12.1 .333 .318 1.000 1.1 1.6 .8 .1 4.2
2007 Detroit 13 0 10.2 .226 .222 1.000 .8 1.2 .5 .1 1.8
2008 Detroit 11 0 10.5 .381 .455 .000 .9 1.3 .7 .0 1.9
2009 Chicago 6 0 4.0 .333 .333 .750 .8 .8 .3 .0 1.0
Career 147 13 14.1 .309 .260 .810 1.3 1.3 .7 .1 3.5

Coaching record[edit]

Legend
Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win-loss %
Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win-loss %
Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result
PHX 2013 41 12 29 .293 5th in Pacific Missed Playoffs
Career 41 12 29 .293

References[edit]

External links[edit]