Lipa, Batangas

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Lipa
Component City
City of Lipa
Aerial View of Downtown Lipa
Aerial View of Downtown Lipa
Official seal of Lipa
Seal
Nickname(s): Next Wave City; Little Rome of the Philippines; City of All Seasons
Location within Batangas Province
Location within Batangas Province
Lipa is located in Philippines
Lipa
Lipa
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 13°56′28″N 121°09′44″E / 13.94111°N 121.16222°E / 13.94111; 121.16222Coordinates: 13°56′28″N 121°09′44″E / 13.94111°N 121.16222°E / 13.94111; 121.16222
Country Philippines
Region CALABARZON (Region IV-A)
Province Batangas
Congr. district 4th district of Batangas
Founded 1605 (as an Augustinian mission center with the name San Sebastian)[1]
Founded 1702 (as a town)
Elevation as a villa under the Spanish Colonial Empire[2] October 21, 1887
Cityhood (under RA No. 162) June 20, 1947
Barangays 72
Government[3]
 • Mayor Meynardo A. Sabili
 • Vice Mayor Eric B. Africa
 • Councilors
Area[4]
 • Total 209.40 km2 (80.85 sq mi)
Elevation 312 m (1,024 ft)
Population (2010)[5]
 • Total 283,468
 • Density 1,400/km2 (3,500/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 4217, 4218
Dialing code 43
Income Class 1st Class
Website www.lipa.gov.ph

Lipa (Tagalog pronunciation: [Li-pâ]), officially the City of Lipa (Filipino: Lungsod ng Lipa), is a first class component city in the province of Batangas in the Philippines. It is one of the three cities in Batangas (the others are Batangas City and Tanauan).[6] It is located 78 kilometres (48 mi) south of Manila and has a population of 283,468 people according to the 2010 census.[5]

The city is named after a species of tree in the Urticaceae family, Dendrocnide meyeniana, known for the stinging Trichomes on its twigs.

Lipa City is a recreational, religious, commercial, industrial and educational center. Attractions include the Hotel la Corona de Lipa, Nestle Philippines, Lipa City National Science High School, Canossa Academy Lipa, Batangas State University (Don Claro Mayo Recto Campus) De La Salle Lipa,University of Batangas- Lipa Campus, Lipa City Colleges, AMA-Lipa, the Nazareth School, the San Sebastian Cathedral (seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lipa), The Mabini Academy (founded in 1922, the oldest school in Lipa City), The Lipa City National High School (the biggest National High School in Lipa City in terms of Population est. 5,000+ students) the Carmelite convent, Robinson's Place Lipa Mall, Mount Malarayat Golf and Country Club, Summit Point Golf and Country Club and SM City Lipa. The city is also home to the Fernando Air Base, former headquarters of the Philippine Air Force's 100th Training Wing and Air Education and Training Command (AETC), known in military circles as the Baguio of the Armed Forces of the Philippines. The Southern Tagalog Arterial Road (STAR) and South Luzon Expressway (SLEX) provide access to Batangas City and Metro Manila.[7]

History[edit]

Datu Dumangsil and Balkasusa were the patriarchs of the ancestry of Lipa

The primal composition is the national of the ancient settlement in the southeastern region of Bombon Lake were elements of the dispersed colonial families founded by Datus Dumangsil and Balkasusa in Taal, Batangas, between the 10th and 13th century AD. These pioneer settlers under the leadership of the fleeing Datu Puti, chief of state of the then mighty Srivijaya Empire, purchased the lowlands from King Marikudo of the Mountain Province at his kingdom. The purchased lands consisted of Panay in the Visayas and the lowlands in Luzon including Batangas. The ten (10) Bornean Datus divided among themselves the purchased lands, the Batangas Bay were apportioned among the Dumangsil and Balkasusa Clans.

It is however subject to conjecture whether the pre-historic Negritos 12,000 to 15,000 years age or the much later waves of Indonesian and Malay seafarers from 5,000 to 300 B.C. were able to settle along the coasts of Batangas into the inner lake region of Taal which was accessible to navigation through the Pansipit River, thus, the possibility of miscegenetic marriages and cross culture among the aboriginal inhabitants, the old settlers and the latter Dumangsil and Balkasusa Clans. Or whether violent wars had been waged between old inhabitants and new colonizers is uncertain too, incontrovertible proofs being wanting.

Out of this Bornean Tribe of the Dumangsil and Balkasusa Clan was born the ancestry of Lipa and as later on their descendants spread out towards Laguna de Bay and Bicol Peninsula. The remains excavated from their ancient settlements in Butong, Taal, Calatagan Bay Area and Balayan attest to the fact of their presence in the said site at least in the latter part of the 12th century down to the coming of Goiti and Legaspi in Batangas in 1570. The flourishing trade relations between these early Batangueños with a number of Chinese merchants prior to the Spanish conquest explained the presence of hundreds of Chinese wares from potteries to stonewares and vases of Sung Dynasty period to the latter part of the 16th century, in the burial grounds at Calatagan sites of Pulung Bakaw, Kay Tomas, Pinagpatayan I and II at Butong, Taal Batangas.

By origin the early Lipeños were Buddhist in religion and Indian in civilization. As such the heritage of the Lipeños was the ancient eastern civilization of India which was twenty times older than its counterpart in Mesopotamia and Nile of the Western World. With its not infrequent contact with the Chinese traders, the Batangueños have absorbed and been influenced too by another giant and ancient civilization that of China herself. And with Spanish colonization of the Philippines and the Salcedo conquest of Batangas in 1572, the Lipeños were forced to embrace the Western Civilization. This is the reason why in Lipa, the east also meets the west.

Spanish Rule[edit]

At the coming of the Spaniards to Batangas in 1570, the Malay settlements along the southern shores of Taal Lake at Tagbakin was inhabited by the warlike descendants of the two (2) datus called the Tagalogs. In 1605, after Marshall Gabriel de Rivera received the encomienda of Bombon, the Augustinian Fathers made Tagbakin the first settlement of the Lipeños and a mission center with the name of San Sebastian, perhaps after the installed Patron Saint, which continued to the present. The settlement was made a regular municipality in 1702 and a regular parish in 1716 with Fray Diego de Alday as the first curate.

Stone mansions once filled Calle Real (now CM Recto Avenue)

With the eruption of Taal Volcano in 1724, the people moved to what is now “Lumang Lipa” and, again, in 1754, they moved to Balete where they settled for two years until 1756 when they moved inland to the present site obviously for more security from volcanic eruptions. When Don Galo de los Reyes was the governadorcillo of Lipa, he introduced the cultivation of coffee. The seeds of the Arabica species were said to be of two chupas brought in from Mexico by an Agustinian missionary. The coffee industry so flourished and made Lipa the richest municipality in the country with an annual income of P4,000,000.00 that on October 21, 1887 the Queen Regent Maria Christina of Spain, acting for the young King Alfonso XIII, elevated Lipa to a city known as “Villa de Lipa”, and later authorized to use a Coat-of Arms by the Royal Overseas Minister Don Victoria Bagner on December 13, 1887.

At the celebration of the elevation of Lipa to a city in January 1888, José Rizal was invited by Dr. Jose Lozada, Catalino Dimayuga and the brothers Celestino and Simeon Luz but Rizal responded only with his Hymno Al Trabajo which he dedicated to the zeal and industry of the Lipeños.

The raising of cacao was introduced in Lipa by an Augustinian priest, Father Ignacio de Mercado, and that was the beginning of its cultivation throughout the Philippines.

The Lipeños also engaged themselves in livestock raising and varied home crafts for men, and small industries, like weaving, embroidery and sewing for women. After World War II, citrus production prevailed until 1970 and, after its decline, about 1965, poultry and swine raising began to take roots and to thrive in no small degree until the present.

The first newspaper in Batangas, published in Spanish, was the Lumubog-Lumutang, printed in Lipa in 1889, and established by the well-known writers Cipriano Kalaw, Gregorio Katigbak, Benito Reyes, Hugo Latorre and Pedro Laygo. Other pioneer Spanish writers were Bernardo Solis, Catalino Dimayuga and Manuel Luz. During the revolution, Gregorio Aguilera Solis edited a newspaper Columnas Voluntas de la Federacion Malaya. This paper became the media for notable poems and literary works of Albino Dimayuga, Baldomero Roxas, Luis Lina Kison, Bernardo Solis, Benedicto Solis, Emiliano Manguiat and Petronio Katigbak. Roman Dimayuga wrote plays, while Pedro Laygo published articles on domestic and international politics and Tomas Umali on military affairs. Hispanistas during the American regime included national figures like Teodoro Kalaw, Fidel Reyes, Arsenio Luz, Max B. Solis, Enrique Laygo and Claro M. Recto. Lipeños also served in the Revolutionary Republic. These were Gregorio Aguilera who was delegate to the Malolos Congress; Ceferino Pantoja, also a member of that congress; Jose Lozada, as envoy to Washington, D.C. and Paris, and Cipriano Kalaw, the first vice-president and Treasurer of the Central Committee of Hong Kong.

In the field of education, Father Valerio Malabanan was foremost among Lipeños who established schools. Others were Sebastian Virrey, Jacinto Silva, Candido Lantin and Gregorio Katigbak. In 1894, Brigido Morada established his own school at his house in Mataas na Lupa. Under Father Valerio Malabanan were such well-known figures as Apolinario Mabini, General Miguel Malvar and Sotero Laurel. Sebastian Virrey countered with such former students as the brothers Alfonso and Claro M. Recto; Fidel and Carmelo Reyes; Teodoro and Maximo Kalaw; Pacifico, Jose and Enrique Laygo; and Manuel Luz Roxas, Jose D. Dimayuga, Bernabe Africa, Pablo Borbon, Potenciano Malvar, Leoncio Aranda and Bishop Alfredo Obviar.. The later school, perhaps marked for permanence by the enthusiastic patronage of its high standard maintained through the years since its founding in 1922 until the present, is the Mabini Academy established by Dr. Jose Ma. Katigbak, Randall A. Rowley, Tarcila Malabanan-Katigbak and Emilia Malabanan.

The first anniversary celebration of Lipa's conversion into a city circa 1947

The fact that Lipeños, even up to the present, are very religious, may be attributed to the fact that Fr. Benito Baras, who was Parish Priest of Lipa for almost three decades (1865–1894), has considered Villa de Lipa as his very own and had shown great paternal love for the Lipeños. He constructed the Parish Church (now Cathedral of the Archdoicese of Lipa) and a new and bigger cemetery with a beautiful chapel. Without aid from the State, he constructed the bridge at Sabang and the road that served as a national highway to Manila and Laguna. The Lipa Parish, established in 1716, became a diocesan center in 1910, included the provinces of Batangas, Laguna, Tayabas (Quezon), Marinduque and Mindoro, with Msgr. Jose Petrelli as the first bishop. On August 15, 1972, the diocese was raised to an eccelesiastical province composed of Batangas province and the dioceses of Lucena, Infanta and Calapan, with Msgr Alejandro Olalia as the first Archbishop. On August 31, 1947, Lipa was inaugurated as a chartered City created under Republic Act No. 162 approved on June 20, 1947.

Geography[edit]

Mt. Malarayat Golf and Country Club

Lipa covers an area of 20,940 hectares (209.4 km2) at an elevation of 1,025 feet (312 m) above sea level. Lipa City's fishing area is located at Barangay Halang, in the west of the city; it is actually a portion of Taal Lake, which is connected to other municipalities (Cuenca, Mataas na Kahoy and Balete).

Lipa City is bounded by the town of Santo Tomas in the northeast, San Pablo City of Laguna and San Antonio, Quezon in the east, the municipalities of Padre Garcia and Rosario in the southeast, the municipalities of Ibaan and San Jose in the southwest, the municipalities of Cuenca and Mataas Na Kahoy and Taal Lake in the west and the municipalities of Balete and Malvar in the northwest.

The city's location, in a valley between Mount Malarayat and Mount Makulot, makes it a low-risk area for natural disasters. These two mountains serve as a windbreak during typhoons. Mount Makulot, in the west, also served as shield during eruptions of the Taal Volcano.

Barangays[edit]

Lipa City is subdivided into 73 barangays;[4] San Jose was formerly known as Patay.[8] In 1955, the sitios of Duhatan, Tagbakin, Initan, Malabong and Halang (then part of the Pinagtungolan barrio) became an independent barrio.[9] In 1957, the sitios of Waniwani, Sayatin and Look were moved from the Balete barrio to the barrio of Look.[10]

The barangays are:

  • Adya
  • Anilao
  • Anilao-Labac
  • Antipolo Del Norte
  • Antipolo Del Sur
  • Bagong Pook
  • Balintawak
  • Banaybanay
  • Bolbok
  • Bugtong na Pulo
  • Bulacnin
  • Bulaklakan
  • Kalamias
  • Cumba
  • Dagatan
  • Duhatan
  • Halang
  • Inosluban
  • Kayumanggi
  • Labac
  • Latag
  • Lodlod
  • Luma
  • Mabini
  • Malagonlong
  • Malitlit
  • Marawoy
  • Mataas Na Lupa
  • Munting Pulo
  • Pagolingin Bata
  • Pagolingin East
  • Pagolingin West
  • Pangao
  • Pinagkawitan
  • Pinagtongulan
  • Plaridel
  • Poblacion Barangay 1
  • Poblacion Barangay 2
  • Poblacion Barangay 3
  • Poblacion Barangay 4
  • Poblacion Barangay 5
  • Poblacion Barangay 6
  • Poblacion Barangay 7
  • Poblacion Barangay 8
  • Poblacion Barangay 9
  • Poblacion Barangay 9-A
  • Poblacion Barangay 10
  • Poblacion Barangay 11
  • Poblacion Barangay 12
  • Pusil
  • Quezon
  • Rizal
  • Sabang
  • Sampaguita
  • San Benito
  • San Carlos
  • San Celestino
  • San Francisco
  • San Guillermo
  • San Isidro (formerly Sapac)
  • San Jose
  • San Lucas
  • San Salvador
  • San Sebastian (Balagbag)
  • Santo Niño
  • Santo Toribio
  • Sico
  • Talisay
  • Tambo
  • Tangob
  • Tanguay
  • Tibig
  • Tipacan

Climate[edit]

Its climate is generally warm, except during typhoons and in summer. The average yearly temperature is 28 °C (82 °F). The highest recorded temperature is 35.7 °C (96.3 °F), and the lowest recorded temperature is 16.4 °C (61.5 °F). Rainfall is sporadic during the year; it is dry from January to May, and wet from June to December.

Climate data for Lipa
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 30
(86)
31
(88)
33
(91)
34
(93)
34
(93)
32
(90)
31
(88)
31
(88)
31
(88)
33
(91)
31
(88)
30
(86)
31.8
(89.2)
Daily mean °C (°F) 26.8
(80.2)
27.0
(80.6)
27.8
(82)
28.8
(83.8)
29.4
(84.9)
28.7
(83.7)
28.3
(82.9)
28.4
(83.1)
28.3
(82.9)
28.1
(82.6)
27.9
(82.2)
27.3
(81.1)
28.07
(82.5)
Average low °C (°F) 23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
24
(75)
25
(77)
25
(77)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
23
(73)
23.8
(74.7)
Rainfall mm (inches) 24
(0.94)
24
(0.94)
17
(0.67)
24
(0.94)
97
(3.82)
166
(6.54)
291
(11.46)
228
(8.98)
230
(9.06)
132
(5.2)
119
(4.69)
115
(4.53)
1,467
(57.77)
Source: World Weather Online[11]

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Lipa City
Year Pop.   ±% p.a.  
1990 160,117 —    
1995 177,894 +1.99%
2000 218,447 +4.50%
2007 260,568 +2.46%
2010 283,468 +3.11%
Source: National Statistics Office[5]

According to the 2000 census, it had a population of 218,447 people in 41,962 households. This increased to 283,468 people in the latest census of 2010. The estimated population of the city is 287,170 in 2011.

Language[edit]

Tagalog is the most widely spoken language in the city. A mere percent of the population can still speak basic Spanish. English is the medium of instruction in schools and is widely understood and spoken especially in the business community and for all official documents.

Religion[edit]

Majority of the city's population are Roman Catholics, and the Archdiocese of Lipa today comprises the civil province of Batangas. The Diocese of Lipa was formed on April 10, 1910 and covered other provinces such as Batangas, Laguna, Quezon, Marinduque and Mindoro with Most Reverend Joseph Petrelli, D.D. as the first bishop.

Currently, the archdiocese is divided into 6 vicariates, each headed by a vicar forane. Diocese clergy. There are 49 parishes in all, served by 143 priests. 122 are diocesan, 13 religious brothers, and 197 religious sisters. There are also 23 existing catholic schools, two high school seminaries, three college seminaries, and two pastoral centers. There are other Christian groups such as Protestant churches (Evangelicals, Born Again, Members Church of God International (MCGI), Kingdom of Jesus Christ), the Iglesia Ni Cristo (Church of Christ) and other non-Christian faiths (Islam, Buddhism).

Economy[edit]

Epson factory in Lipa

Lipa’s proximity to the country’s capital, Manila, having an approximate distance of 86 kilometers or an hour and half drive via the Southern Luzon Expressway enhances its strategic access to development trends. It is fast emerging as a key city in the province, becoming a major institutional/administrative center, medical center, commercial center, financial center, agro-industrial center and residential center.

It is identified as an ideal hub and center of the CALABARZON Agro-Industrial Region in the Regional Physical Framework Plan of Region IV-A. In the recent past, Lipa is being transformed from basically agricultural to a highly urbanizing area. A significant portion of the agricultural land area of the city has been converted to residential subdivisions, industrial area with the establishment of LIMA Technology Center utilizing lands in the city and Malvar Municipality. Recently, the influx of business process outsourcing (BPO) firms such as call centers have contributed much to the growth of the local economy. BPO sites are scattered throughout the city. It ranked 6th out of 10 in the Top 10 next wave cities of 2010 by the Commission of Information and Communication Technology (ICCT).

Health[edit]

Medical facilities:

  • Divine Love General Hospital
  • Fernando Airbase Hospital
  • Holy Family Clinic
  • Lipa City District Hospital
  • Lipa Doctors' Hospital
  • Lipa Medix Medical Center
  • Mary Mediatrix Medical Center
  • MDLink
  • Metro Lipa Medical Center
  • N.L. Villa Memorial Medical Center
  • Ospital ng Lipa
  • San Antonio Medical Center
  • The Medical City Lipa Clinic

Infrastructure[edit]

Road networks[edit]

Claro M. Recto Avenue.

Lipa has an extensive road network. The city is a transportation hub for Batangas and nearby provinces.

  • Jose P. Laurel Highway: Primary highway linking Lipa to northern towns and cities (Malvar, Tanauan City, Santo Tomas, Calamba City) and southern Batangas (San Jose and Batangas City). Industrial sites are found along the highway (PKI, LIMA Technology Center, Light Industrial Park, First Philippine Industrial Park).
  • STAR Tollway: Expressway extending from Batangas City to Santo Tomas, connected to SLEX via ACTEX. Driving time from Lipa to Manila is about 90 minutes.
  • Ayala Highway: Known to Lipeños as the "Uptown", it is a diversion road from Barangay Marawoy to Barangay Mataas na Lupa (passing through Barangay Balintawak). Establishments along the highway include SM City Lipa, Robinsons Place Lipa, South Supermarket, Lipa Medix Medical Center, Mary Mediatrix Medical Center, Nissan Lipa, Ford Lipa, Mitsubishi Lipa, Hotel La Corona de Lipa, Seller's Inn, Hotel ni Mang Jose, CARNES Motors, Figaro, Starbucks, K Pointe(banking and financial center), the San Miguel and Lipa bus stops and the regional office of the Department of Labor and Employment. More than 10 banks are located along the highway.
  • Claro M. Recto Avenue: Known as the "Downtown", it is located within the city and is the center of business and commerce. About 20 banks and several fast-food chains are located along the avenue
  • P. Torres Avenue: Major street leading to Padre Garcia, Rosario, Taysan and San Juan. Several commercial establishments are located along the road.
  • General Luna Avenue: Located in Barangay Sabang, it is an emerging business center near the city. Several banks and commercial establishments are found there.
  • B. Morada Avenue: Located in the city, major banks and government offices (DTI, PNP, LTO, DOTC, Post Office) are found here (along with the Lipa City Youth and Cultural Center, private and public schools).
Ayala Highway
  • Lipa-Santo Tomas Road: Links Lipa with Santo Tomas, Batangas and Alaminos, Laguna; also leads to the LPL Ranch and Summit Point Golf Club (in Barangays Inosluban and San Lucas)
  • Governor Feliciano P. Leviste Road: Known as the Lipa-Balete Road Links Lipa with Balete
  • Lipa-San Pablo Road: Links Lipa with San Pablo City

Public transportation[edit]

Buses, vans, jeepneys, tricycles, and multicabs common means of transportation in the city. Large numbers of jeepneys ply their trade around the city, and are becoming the primary mode of transportation.A grand terminal built beside SM City Lipa mall now serves as the city's central transport terminal.

Air[edit]

There are plans to convert the Basilio Fernando Airbase into an economic zone and international airport handling domestic flights and international cargo.

Local government[edit]

Lipa City Hall

Vilma Santos, former Lipa City mayor (1998–2007), became the governor of Batangas in 2007 and former Congressman Oscar Gozos became mayor of Lipa. The vice mayor is Lydio Lopez, who is serving his second term. The Sangguniang Panglungsod is composed of the following councillors: Merlo P. Silva, Ralph Peter S. Umali, Dy Pang Lim, Ma. Concepcion R. Hernandez, Avior Rocafort, Aries Emmanuel Mendoza, Raul A. Montealto, Leonilo Catipon, Romy Macasaet III and Dominador Mauhay. The Sangguniang Kabataan (city Federation) president is Regine M. Mayo of Barangay Poblacion 6, and Capt. Renato V. Malleta of Barangay Poblacion 9A is president of the Association of Barangay Captains.

In the 2010 local elections, Gozos failed in his re-election bid to former Provincial Board Member Meynardo Sabili. However, Lopez was re-elected for a final term, and most of Gozos' councillors comprised the next Sangguniang Panglungsod on July 1, 2010. The Sangguniang Panglungsod is composed of the following councillors: Merlo P. Silva, Eric B. Africa, Ralph Peter S. Umali, Ma. Concepcion R. Hernandez, Avior R. Rocafort, Dy Pang Lim, Donato O. Linatoc, Dominador M. Mauhay, Raul A. Montealto, and Aries D. Macala. The Sangguniang Kabataan president is Christian John Jessie B. Fonte of Barangay 7, and Capt. Marlon M. Luancing of Barangay Antipolo Del Sur is president of the Association of Barangay Captains.

Government agencies[edit]

  • International Training Center on Pig Husbandry (ITCPH)
  • Department of Agrarian Reform-Regional Office
  • Department of Agriculture-Southern Tagalog Integrated Agricultural Research Center (STIARC)
  • Land Transportation Office-Regional Office
  • National Statistics Office-Regional Office
  • Regional Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory
  • Regional Trial Court-Branch 12
  • Regional Trial Court-Branch 13
  • Department of Agrarian Reform-Provincial Office
  • Department of Trade and Industry-Provincial Office
  • Bureau of Fire Protection-Lipa City
  • Bureau of Internal Revenue-District Office
  • Commission on Audit
  • Commission on Elections
  • Department of Agrarian Reform-Lipa City
  • Department of Education-Division Office
  • Department of Interior and Local Government-Lipa City
  • Department of Publice Works and Highways-Lipa City
  • Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB)
  • Land Transportation Office-District Office
  • Motor Vehicle Inspection Station (MVIS)
  • Municipal Trial Court
  • National Statistics Office-District Office
  • Parole and Probation Office
  • Philippine National Police-Lipa City
  • Register of Deeds
  • Office of the City Prosecutor
  • Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA)
  • Social Security System (SSS)

Sister cities[edit]

Lipa City is twinned with the following cities:

City Subdivision Country Date
Fremont  California  United States

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ "Official City/Municipal 2013 Election Results". Intramuros, Manila, Philippines: Commission on Elections (COMELEC). 11 September 2013. Retrieved {{subst:date}}. 
  4. ^ a b "Province: BATANGAS". PSGC Interactive. Makati City, Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved {{subst:date}}. 
  5. ^ a b c "Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay: as of May 1, 2010". 2010 Census of Population and Housing. National Statistics Office. Retrieved {{subst:date}}. 
  6. ^ Lipa City's Famous Destinations Retrieved 2012-01-24.
  7. ^ Abs-Cbn Interactive, President Arroyo inaugurates Batangas port project
  8. ^ "An Act Changing the Name of the Barrio of Patay, in the City of Lipa, to San Jose". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-09. 
  9. ^ "An Act to Create the Barrio of Bungahan in the City of Lipa". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-12. 
  10. ^ "An Act Creating the Barrio of Look in the City of Lipa". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-12. 
  11. ^ "Average High/Low Temperature for Lipa City, Philippines". World Weather Online. Retrieved 3 May 2012. 

External links[edit]