Lisa Bero

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Lisa Anne Bero
photo of Lisa Bero
Lisa Bero at the 21st Annual Cochrane Colloquium, Quebec, September 2013
Born Lisa Anne Bero
(1958-08-04) 4 August 1958 (age 55)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Residence San Francisco, USA
Fields
  • Translating research into health policy
  • Research integrity
  • Essential medicines
Institutions
Alma mater
Thesis The interaction of opioid and serotonergic systems regulation prolactin secretion in the developing rat (1987)
Known for
  • Research and policy on industry influence on research
  • Studying research integrity
  • WHO essential medicines
  • Cochrane Collaboration
  • The Cigarette Papers (1996)

Lisa Anne Bero, born 1958, is an academic who originally trained in pharmacology and went on to a career studying research integrity and how clinical and basic sciences are translated into clinical practice and health policy.[1][2] She is Professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy (School of Pharmacy) and in the Institute of Health Policy Studies (School of Medicine) at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF).[3] She is also Chair of the World Health Organization (WHO) Essential Medicines Committee,[4] Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Pharmaceutical Research and Science Policy,[5] and Co-Chair of the Cochrane Collaboration.[6] Bero has received multiple awards for her extensive mentoring of high school students to junior faculty.[7]

Education[edit]

Bero gained a Bachelor of Science, Physiology/Philosophy, from Michigan State University in 1980.[3] She was awarded a PhD in pharmacology and toxicology from Duke University in 1987.[8] She received a National Institute on Drug Abuse postdoctoral fellowship on the molecular basis of opiate addiction, but left basic research for health policy when she received a Pew Health Policy Fellowship in 1988, which included training in epidemiology.[1][9]

Career[edit]

A fellowship from the Pew Charitable Trust enabled her to make a transition from the basic sciences to health policy.[9] Bero explained the impact of this on her career: "I do a lot of work on government committees and international committees. Had it not been for the Pew program I would have been a much more typical academic."[9] She had a particular interest in the evidence basis for health practice and policy, often in controversial areas.[1] She began researching both the evidence to improve prescribing, and the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on drug research, and going on to an interest in the tobacco industry's influence on research and policy.[1] Her areas of research have since also included methods for assessing bias and quality of research and scientific publications, and the dissemination and policy implications of research.[4]

Bero went on to advocate for policy changes at both policy and community levels, for example to end tobacco sales in San Francisco pharmacies.[10] She is a co-author of The Cigarette Papers,[11] a collection of documents published in 1996 that played a key role in litigation of tobacco companies. It has been called "the Pentagon Papers of tobacco."[12]

After her postdoctoral position, Bero joined the faculty of the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) where she is now Professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy (School of Pharmacy), Professor in the Institute of Health Policy Studies (School of Medicine), Vice-Chair for Research in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy.[3] She has served as Chair of the UCSF Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Conflicts of Interest.[4]

Bero was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Conflict of Interest in Medical Research, Education and Practice, which published its report in 2009.[2] Along with Robert Krughoff and George Loewenstein, she co-authored a minority opinion entitled "Model for broader disclosure" (Appendix F) arguing that given the "serious limitations in the accuracy, completeness, comparability, and timeliness of conflict of interest information reported to institutions and to the public," the IOM recommendations did not go far enough. Their proposed model was based on the development of a database centralizing data on academics' potential conflicts of interest.[2]

She was a senior editor of the journal Tobacco Control, and an editor for the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.[13]

World Health Organization[edit]

Bero's first contact with the World Health Organization (WHO) occurred through her Pew Fellowship in the late 1980s.[9] She has been first an advisor, then a member of the WHO Essential Medicines Committee since 2005, and is currently Chair.[4] Bero has been a member of the Pan-American Health Organization's (PAHO, WHO Regional Office for the Americas) Advisory Committee for Health Research (ACHR) since 2008.[14]

In 2011, she became the foundation Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Pharmaceutical Research and Science Policy.[5] The Centre's areas of work are pharmaceuticals (including essential medicines), health systems research and development, and research policy.[5]

In 2011, the Cochrane Collaboration became a non-governmental organization in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO), including a seat on the World Health Assembly.[15] Bero is one of the Collaboration's two representatives for WHO.[15]

Cochrane Collaboration[edit]

Bero was an editor of the Cochrane Collaboration Review Group on Effective Professional Practice and Organization of Care from the late 1990s.[16] She led the development of the Criticism Management System for the Cochrane Library, implemented in 1997.[17]

Bero has been the Director of the San Francisco Branch of the US Cochrane Center since its original establishment as the San Francisco Cochrane Center in 1995[18] and is Co-Director of the US Cochrane Center.[19] She served on the Collaboration Steering Group from 1996 to 2000, and again from 2004 to 2010.[18] Bero rejoined the Steering Group when she was elected Co-Chair of the Collaboration in 2013.[4]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Harold S. Luft Award for Mentoring in Health Services and Health Policy Research in 2009. She was the first recipient of this award by the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California San Francisco.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Holmes, D (May 19, 2012). "Lisa Bero: taking the path of most resistance.". Lancet 379 (9829): 1869. PMID 22608326. 
  2. ^ a b c Lo, Bernard; Field, Marilyn J.; Committee on Conflict of Interest in Medical Research, Education, and Practice, Board on Health Sciences (2009). Conflict of interest in medical research, education, and practice. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press. ISBN 978-0-309-13188-9. 
  3. ^ a b c Department of Clinical Pharmacy. "Faculty & Staff". University of California San Francisco. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e University of California San Francisco. "Lisa Bero, PhD". UCSF profiles. Retrieved 2 December 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c World Health Organization. "WHO Collaborating Centres Global Database". World Health Organization. Retrieved 2 December 2013. 
  6. ^ "Steering Group and Subgroups". Cochrane Collaboration. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies. "Harold S. Luft Award for Mentoring in Health Services and Health Policy Research". University of California San Francisco. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  8. ^ Bero, Lisa (1987). The interaction of opioid and serotonergic systems regulation prolactin secretion in the developing rat (PhD dissertation). Durham, NC: Duke University. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Chilingerian, Jon; Kay, Corinne; Institute of Medicine (1997). The lessons and the legacy of the Pew Health Policy Program. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. ISBN 978-0-309-05825-4. 
  10. ^ Bero, Lisa (27 July 2008). "Snuff out tobacco sales in S.F. pharmacies". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  11. ^ Glantz, Stanton A; Slade, J; Bero, LA; Hanauer, P; Barnes, DE (1996). The cigarette papers. Berkeley: University of California press. ISBN 9780520213722. 
  12. ^ Weiner, Jon (1 January 1996). "The Cigarette Papers". Frontline, PBS. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  13. ^ Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group. "Newsletters". Cochrane Collaboration. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  14. ^ "Advisory Committee on Health Research (ACHR)". List of ACHR members, their nationality and tenure. Pan-American Health Organization. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  15. ^ a b World Health Organization. "TCC/WHO Collaboration Plan for the Period 2010-2012". WHO Ref NoN61/348/165. Cochrane Collaboration. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  16. ^ Bero, LA; Grilli, R; Grimshaw, JM; Harvey, E; Oxman, AD; Thomson, MA (Aug 15, 1998). "Closing the gap between research and practice: an overview of systematic reviews of interventions to promote the implementation of research findings. The Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care Review Group.". BMJ (Clinical research ed.) 317 (7156): 465–8. PMID 9703533. 
  17. ^ Ober, M; Shohara, R; Rennie, D; Yank, V; Bero, LA (Mar 2002). "The Criticism Management System for the Cochrane Library.". Evaluation & the health professions 25 (1): 98–115. PMID 11868449. 
  18. ^ a b "The San Francisco Branch of the US Cochrane Center". UCSF. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  19. ^ "More about us". US Cochrane Center. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  20. ^ The San Francisco Division of the Academic Senate. "The 2008-2009 Distinction in Mentoring Award Recipients". University of California San Francisco. Retrieved 1 December 2013.