Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration

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The Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration was a treaty of 31 October 1958, which established a Special Union under Article 19 of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property (1883).[1] It attempted to regulate geographical indications. Some aspects of it have been superseded by the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights. It ensured that member countries would protect appellations of origin as they are protected in their country of origin. It laid down provisions for what qualified as an appellation of origin, protection measures and an International Register of Appellations of Origin, run by the World Intellectual Property Organization. It came into force in 1966, and was revised at Stockholm (14 July 1967) and amended September 28, 1979. It failed to get any more than 20 signatories.[2] As of May 2013, 28 states have ratified the convention and 900 appellations of origin has been registered.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration. WIPO. Accessed 24 February 2012.
  2. ^ The law of geographical indications. Bernard O'Connor. (2004) p.36 onwards. Accessed 9 June 2010.
  3. ^ "About Lisbon Agreement". WIPO. Retrieved 24 February 2012.