Lise Klaveness

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Lise Klaveness
Personal information
Full name Lise Klaveness
Date of birth (1981-04-19) 19 April 1981 (age 33)
Place of birth Meland, Norway
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Playing position Midfielder, Forward
Youth career
Kvernbit
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1997–1999 Sandviken
2000 Bjørnar
2001 Athene Moss
2002–2005 Asker
2006–2007 Umeå
2008 Asker 21 (13)
2009–2011 Stabæk 59 (41)
National team
2002–2011 Norway 73 (9)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Lise Klaveness (born 19 April 1981) is a Norwegian lawyer and footballer who played 73 matches for the Norway women's national football team between 2002 and her retirement from international football in 2011.

Club career[edit]

Her clubs include IL Sandviken, Bjørnar (now Arna-Bjørnar) (2000), FK Athene Moss (2001), Asker (2002–2005, 2008) and, in 2006/07, Umeå IK where she was vice-captain for the 2007 season. At the end of her time in Umeå she went on holiday to West Africa where she contracted serious food poisoning with a body temperature of 42 degrees C. In her own words, "I met the man with the scythe".

In 2008 she returned to Norway and played again for Asker, and was also the club's physical trainer as well as qualifying as a lawyer and beginning full-time work for a law firm in Oslo.

At the end of 2008 when Asker became bankrupt most first-team players including Klaveness transferred to Stabæk IF, the nearby top sports club, to set up Stabæk Fotball Kvinner (SFK). Stabæk therefore became the first Norwegian club to have men's and women's teams playing in the two elite divisions, the Tippeligaen and the Toppserien. Despite retiring from international football in 2011 Klaveness was contracted to continue playing for SFK in 2012. But she announced her retirement from all football in March 2012 after her enthusiasm waned.[1]

International career[edit]

Klaveness played in Norway's team in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup tournament in the USA, and in the UEFA Women's Euro 2005, also known as the European Cup competition, played in England.

She played on the Norwegian team that finished fourth at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China,[2] but retired from the Norwegian national team at the end of the 2007 season having played 51 matches and scored six goals. The manner of Klaveness' departure was controversial, as coach Bjarne Berntsen told her she was no longer required in the airport lounge immediately after the long flight home from the World Cup in China. This shocked and upset Klaveness and some of her team mates.[3] She was recalled in 2009 after Eli Landsem replaced Bertsen as the team's trainer.

In October 2009 she was recalled to the women's national team for two matches in the qualification stage of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. Eventually she completed a further 22 matches for Norway.

Post playing career[edit]

As a specialist in employment law Klaveness is sometimes involved with disputes between football clubs and their employees.[4] She also serves on the management committee of NISO, the organisation for sports people in Norway.[5]

Klaveness announced her retirement from football in March 2012. Further to her career as an advocate, she is also serving as a deputy judge in the Oslo court.[6] Since her playing retirement, Klaveness has also worked as a television football pundit. She was a studio commentator for NRK's coverage of the 2014 [men's] World Cup, after which she was subject to sexist criticism by internet trolls.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Klaveness gir seg" (in Norwegian). Verdens Gang. 15 March 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007 – Norway (NOR)". FIFA. Retrieved 31 January 2009. 
  3. ^ Sjem, Sturla (17 October 2007). "Kraftig oppgjør med Bjarne Berntsen" (in Norwegian). Verdens Gang. Retrieved 6 October 2014. 
  4. ^ Klaveness in court again
  5. ^ NISO Management 2011-2013
  6. ^ Klaveness retiring
  7. ^ Mørch Larsen, Bjørn O. (29 June 2014). "I vater med Viljar" (in Norwegian). Bergensavisen. Retrieved 6 October 2014. 

External links[edit]