List of 1930s jazz standards

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A Caucasian man in his thirties is sitting behind a piano facing left. He has short, dark hair and is wearing a suit jacket, a white shirt and a necktie. He is looking down at a music sheet before him and points to it with his left hand. Another man is standing on his right, also wearing a suit, white shirt and a necktie. He is bent slightly toward the man on the left and looking at him, appearing concentrated in thinking. His eyes are half-closed and his left arm raised as if he was holding a glass.
Richard Rodgers (left) and Lorenz Hart were responsible for a large number of 1930s standards, including "Blue Moon" (1934), "My Romance" (1935) and "My Funny Valentine" (1937).

Jazz standards are musical compositions that are widely known, performed and recorded by jazz artists as part of the genre's musical repertoire. This list includes compositions written in the 1930s that are considered standards by at least one major fake book publication or reference work. Some of the tunes listed were already well known standards by the 1940s, while others were popularized later. Where appropriate, the years when the most influential recordings of a song were made are indicated in the list.

Broadway theatre contributed some of the most popular standards of the 1930s, including George and Ira Gershwin's "Summertime" (1935), Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's "My Funny Valentine" (1937) and Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's "All the Things You Are" (1939). These songs still rank among the most recorded standards.[1] Johnny Green's "Body and Soul" was used in a Broadway show and became a hit after Coleman Hawkins's 1939 recording. It is the most recorded jazz standard of all time.[2]

In the 1930s, swing jazz emerged as a dominant form in American music. Duke Ellington and his band members composed numerous swing era hits that have become standards: "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" (1932), "Sophisticated Lady" (1933) and "Caravan" (1936), among others. Other influential bandleaders of this period were Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway and Fletcher Henderson. Goodman's band became well-known from the radio show Let's Dance and in 1937 introduced a number of jazz standards to a wide audience in the first jazz concert performed in Carnegie Hall.[3]

1930[edit]

A man in his late thirties is sitting sideways on a chair or a couch. He is facing the camera and looking directly at it. The backrest of the chair is on his left side; his right hand is placed on the backrest and his left arm is resting on it. He is smiling.
George Gershwin's songs have gained lasting popularity among both jazz and pop audiences. Among standards composed by him are "The Man I Love" (1924), "Embraceable You" (1930), "I Got Rhythm" (1930) and "Summertime" (1935).
The chord progression from Gershwin's "I Got Rhythm". Sequenced stride piano version, with elaboration. The chord progression, known as "rhythm changes", has been used as the basis of numerous jazz compositions, including many standards.

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  • "Body and Soul"[4][5][6][7] is a song composed by Johnny Green with lyrics by Frank Eyton, Edward Heyman and Robert Sour. The song was used in the successful Broadway revue Three's a Crowd and became an instant hit, despite being banned from the radio for almost a year for its sexually suggestive lyrics.[2] The first jazz recording was by Louis Armstrong in 1930. Coleman Hawkins's 1939 recording consisted of three minutes of improvisation over the song's chord progression with only passing references to the melody. Hawkins's rendition was the first purely jazz recording that became a commercial hit[8] and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1973.[9] The song is the most recorded jazz standard of all time.[2]
  • "But Not for Me"[10] was introduced by Ginger Rogers in the Broadway musical Girl Crazy. It was composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. The song failed to achieve significant pop success, charting only once in 1942. However, it became popular in the jazz world, especially for female vocalists.[11]
  • "Confessin'"[4][12] was composed by Ellis Reynolds and Doc Daugherty, with lyrics by Al J. Neiburg. Louis Armstrong recorded it in 1930, and Rudy Vallée and Guy Lombardo both made the charts with their versions the same year.[13] Saxophonist Lester Young recorded it several times during his career.[13] Country singer Frank Ifield had a number one hit with the song in the United Kingdom in 1963.[13] The song is also known as "I'm Confessin' (That I Love You)".[13]
  • "Embraceable You"[14] was originally composed by George Gershwin for an unfinished operetta East to West in 1928. It became a big hit after Ginger Rogers introduced it in the Broadway musical Girl Crazy. Lyrics were written by Ira Gershwin. Billie Holiday's 1944 recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2005.[9]
  • "Exactly Like You"[15][16] was sung by Harry Richman and Gertrude Lawrence in Broadway show Lew Leslie's International Revue. It was composed by Jimmy McHugh with lyrics by Dorothy Fields. Louis Armstrong recorded the first jazz version in 1930. Benny Goodman's 1936 recording, sung by Lionel Hampton, revived interest in the song; the following year it was recorded by Count Basie and Quintette du Hot Club de France.[17]
  • "Georgia on My Mind"[4][10][18] is a song composed by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics by Stuart Gorrell. Bix Beiderbecke played cornet on Carmichael's original 1930 recording. Frankie Trumbauer recorded the first hit version of the song in 1931. Ray Charles's version on The Genius Hits the Road (1960) was a number one hit, won two Grammy Awards and is considered to be the definitive version of the song.[19] The song was designated as the state song of Georgia in 1979.[19]
  • "I Got Rhythm"[10] was composed by George Gershwin for the Broadway musical Girl Crazy, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. First-timer Ethel Merman's performance on Girl Crazy stole the limelight from leading lady Ginger Rogers. The song's chord progression has been used in countless jazz compositions, and is commonly known as "rhythm changes".[20] George Gershwin's last concert composition, Variations on "I Got Rhythm" was based on this song.[21]
  • "Love for Sale"[10] is a song from Cole Porter's Broadway musical The New Yorkers. Its prostitution-themed lyrics were considered bad taste at the time, and the song was banned from the radio. The ban, however, only increased the song's popularity.[22] Porter himself was actually pleased that it could not be sung over the air.[23] In the original musical the song was first sung by Kathryn Crawford and later by Elizabeth Welch.[22] The song took time to catch on as a jazz standard, possibly because it was 72 measures long. When Sidney Bechet recorded it in 1947, the song was not yet a regular jazz number.[22]
  • "Memories of You"[4][24][25] first appeared in the musical revue Blackbirds of 1930. It was composed by Eubie Blake and lyrics were written by Andy Razaf. It was introduced by Minto Cato on Broadway[26] and the first recording was made by Ethel Waters in 1930.[27] Louis Armstrong's 1930 recording was Lionel Hampton's debut performance as a vibraphonist and rose to number 18 on the charts.[26] Hampton later recorded the tune again with Benny Goodman's orchestra; this version has made the song a popular clarinet number.[26]
  • "Mood Indigo"[4][10][28][29] is a jazz song composed by Barney Bigard and Duke Ellington, with lyrics by Irving Mills. Bigard has admitted borrowing parts of the song from a composition called "Dreamy Blues" by his teacher Lorenzo Tio.[30] The lyrics were written by Mitchell Parish, who then sold them to Mills's publishing company for a fixed price.[31][32] When the song became a hit, Parish was therefore left without royalties.[33] Ellington's 1930 recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1975.[9]
  • "On the Sunny Side of the Street"[4][10][34][35][36] was written by composer Jimmy McHugh and lyricist Dorothy Fields for the Broadway musical Lew Leslie's International Revue. Harry Richman sang it in the original revue.[37] Although the musical was a flop, "On the Sunny Side of the Street" became instantly popular. Richman and Ted Lewis charted with it in 1930,[37] and Louis Armstrong recorded his version in 1934. The song is readily associated with Armstrong today.[38] Tommy Dorsey and Jo Stafford both brought the song to the charts in 1945.[37] Jeremy Wilson argues that the song may actually have been composed by Fats Waller, who then sold the rights for it.[37]

1931[edit]

1932[edit]

A short-haired black man is sitting behind a piano facing right. He is wearing an opened suit jacket, a white shirt and a necktie. His hands are on the keyboard and he appears to be playing. On the background there is a brick wall on which two paintings or photographs are partly visible.
Virtuoso pianist Art Tatum mostly played Broadway and popular standards. He usually radically reworked the songs and had the ability to make standards sound like new compositions. Tatum's influential piano solos include "Tiger Rag", "Willow Weep for Me" and "Over the Rainbow".

1933[edit]

  • "Don't Blame Me"[4][10][73][74] was introduced in the musical revue Clowns in Clover and included in the 1933 film Dinner at Eight. The film is often mistakenly given as the song's origin. The first hit recordings were by Guy Lombardo and Ethel Waters in 1933. Nat King Cole recorded it several times as an instrumental, and had a hit with a 1944 vocal version. Charlie Parker made an influential ballad rendition in 1947. The song was composed by Jimmy McHugh with lyrics by Dorothy Fields.[75]
  • "I Cover the Waterfront", composed by Johnny Green with lyrics by Edward Heyman, was inspired by the 1932 novel of the same name by Max Miller. The song was included in the score of the 1933 film I Cover the Waterfront. Louis Armstrong, Joe Haymes, Eddy Duchin and composer Green all made recordings of the song in 1933, and Haymes's and Duchin's versions made the pop charts. Billie Holiday recorded the song many times during her career. Art Tatum recorded it as a solo piano piece in 1949 and returned to it several times.[76]
  • "It's Only a Paper Moon"[4][77][78] is a song from the short-lived Broadway show The Great Magoo, composed by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Yip Harburg and Billy Rose. Originally titled "If You Believed in Me", the current title was introduced in the 1933 film Take a Chance. The song first charted in 1933 with Paul Whiteman's and Cliff Edwards's recordings. Nat King Cole recorded a trio performance of it in 1943, and both Ella Fitzgerald and Benny Goodman charted with the song in 1945.[79]
  • "Sophisticated Lady"[4][10][80][81] is a jazz composition by Duke Ellington. Lyrics were later added by Irving Mills and Mitchell Parish. Ellington's recording rose to number three on the charts. Glen Gray and Don Redman also charted with the song in 1933. Lawrence Brown and Toby Hardwick have claimed to have composed parts of the music; according to Stuart Nicholson's Ellington biography, the original composer credits included Ellington, Brown, Hardwick and Mills, but only Ellington was credited when the song was published.[82]
  • "Yesterdays"[4][40][83] was composed by Jerome Kern for the Broadway musical Roberta, with lyrics by Otto Harbach. It was introduced by Irene Dunne. Not as popular in the pop world as "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" from the same musical, it has enjoyed much more success in jazz circles. The song is often associated with Billie Holiday, who recorded it in 1944.[84]

1934[edit]

  • "Autumn in New York"[4][85] was written for the Broadway musical Thumbs Up! by Vernon Duke, who contributed both music and lyrics for the song. Introduced on stage by J. Harold Murray, it was not until 1947 that the song became a hit with Jo Stafford's and Frank Sinatra's recordings. It became a popular jazz number in the 1950s after Charlie Parker recorded it for his album Charlie Parker with Strings.[86]
  • "Blue Moon",[10][87] composed by Richard Rodgers, was originally named "Prayer" and meant for the musical film Hollywood Party. Lorenz Hart rewrote the lyrics two times for Manhattan Melodrama, and eventually it was sung by Shirley Ross as "The Bad in Every Man". It was later released commercially as "Blue Moon", with yet another set of lyrics. Hart disliked the final version, which nonetheless became his most popular song.[88] A 1961 rock and roll version by The Marcels sold a million copies and was included in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's list of 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.[89]
  • "Solitude"[4][10][90][91] is a Duke Ellington composition with lyrics by Eddie DeLange. Irving Mills received co-credit for the lyrics as Ellington's agent. Ellington claimed to have composed the song in 20 minutes. Two recordings made the charts in 1935, one by Ellington and one by the Mills Blue Rhythm Band. Ellington's first vocal recording was made in 1940 with singer Ivie Anderson. The song is also known as "In My Solitude".[92]
  • "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes"[4][10][93] is a song from Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach's Broadway musical Roberta. Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra's recording reached number one on the pop charts in 1934. A million-selling, Billboard Hot 100 number one version was recorded by doo-wop group The Platters in 1958. Kern originally composed the song as a fast tap-dance number for his 1927 musical Show Boat, and converted it into a ballad for Roberta. The song is particularly favored by piano players; Teddy Wilson made an early influential piano version in 1941.[94]
  • "Stars Fell on Alabama"[10][95] was written by composer Frank Perkins and lyricist Mitchell Parish. The first jazz recording was made by Benny Goodman in 1934. Jack Teagarden recorded it many times; his first recording was made with Goodman's orchestra in 1934 and he performed it in a 1947 Boston Symphony Hall concert with Louis Armstrong's All Stars.[96]
  • "Stompin' at the Savoy"[4][10][97][98] is a jazz composition by Edgar Sampson with lyrics by Andy Razaf.[99] First recorded by Chick Webb in 1934, it was popularized by Benny Goodman's 1936 recording.[100] Both Webb and Goodman received composer co-credit for the song.[99] It was named after the Savoy Ballroom in New York; the song title is referenced in a commemorative plaque put up in the ballroom's place when it was torn down in 1958.[100]

1935[edit]

A dark-skinned woman is sitting behind a wooden desk or a counter, facing the camera and looking to the right. She is wearing a winter coat, a hat and large shining earrings. Her right hand is on the desk and there is a thick, shining ring in its ring finger. Behind her on the right hangs a flag with one darkly colored star visible.
Many 1930s standards were popularized by jazz singer Billie Holiday's recordings, including "These Foolish Things", "Embraceable You" and "Yesterdays".

1936[edit]

1937[edit]

1938[edit]

  • "Cherokee"[151][152] is a jazz song originally written by Ray Noble as a part of a larger Indian Suite. It became a hit for Charlie Barnet in 1939 as an instrumental. Barnet adopted an extended version of it into his theme song, credited to himself and titled "Redskin Rhumba". Don Byas recorded the piece in 1945, and the same year Charlie Parker used its harmonic progression in his composition "Ko-Ko". Buddy DeFranco's "Swinging the Indian" is also based on the same chord progression. The song is also known as "Indian Love Song".[153]
  • "Heart and Soul"[154][155] is a Hoagy Carmichael composition with lyrics by Frank Loesser. It was first performed by Larry Clinton and His Orchestra featuring Bea Wain in the short film A Song Is Born; their version charted at number one in 1939.[156] The song has been recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, Dean Martin, and Dave Brubeck, among others.[156] It has become a popular piece among amateur pianists.[157]
  • "Love Is Here to Stay" was George Gershwin's last composition, written for the musical film The Goldwyn Follies. Lyrics were provided by Ira Gershwin. The song gained little attention from The Goldwyn Follies and is better known for the 1952 film An American in Paris. It was the last song George Gershwin composed.[158] The song was originally titled "Our Love Is Here to Stay"; Ira Gershwin later said that he would have wanted to change the title back to the original one if the song had not already become popular under its new name.[159]
  • "The Nearness of You"[4][160] was composed by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics by Ned Washington. It was meant to be included in the film Romance in the Rough, which was never produced. The first hit version was made by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra in 1940. Sarah Vaughan recorded the song in 1949 and several times afterwards. Charlie Parker recorded it live with Woody Herman's Orchestra in 1951.[161]
  • "One O'Clock Jump" is an instrumental twelve-bar blues composition by Count Basie. Used as the signature piece of Basie's band, it is strongly associated with the swing era and remains one of the best-known compositions of the period.[162] Saxophonist Buster Smith wrote a part of the composition, but was denied co-credit by Basie.[163][164] "One O'Clock Jump" was taken to the charts by Harry James in 1938 and by the Metronome All-Stars in 1941. Benny Goodman gave an influential performance of it in his 1938 Carnegie Hall concert.[165]
  • "Prelude to a Kiss"[10][166][167] is a jazz ballad composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Irving Mills and Mack Gordon. It was first recorded as an instrumental by the Duke Ellington Orchestra featuring Johnny Hodges, who later recorded it with his own orchestra and vocalist Mary McHugh. The composition was based on a melody by Ellington's saxophonist Otto Hardwick.[168]
  • "September Song"[4][169][170] was introduced by Walter Huston in the Broadway musical Knickerbocker Holiday. It was composed by Kurt Weill with lyrics by Maxwell Anderson. Later hit recordings were made by Frank Sinatra in 1946 and Sarah Vaughan in 1954. Artie Shaw recorded it in 1945 with a big band featuring saxophonist Chuck Gentry. Don Byas made a 1946 recording with his quartet. Guitarist Django Reinhardt recorded the song four times, starting in 1947.[171]
  • "You Go to My Head" was written by composer J. Fred Coots and lyricist Haven Gillespie and introduced by Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra, who charted at number nine in 1938. Teddy Wilson with vocalist Nan Wynn charted with it in 1938, as did Larry Clinton and His Orchestra with Bea Wain. The song's harmonic sophistication has been praised by critics, who often describe Coots as a "one-hit wonder" despite his "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" being even more popular in terms of mass appeal.[172]

1939[edit]

A Caucasian man in his thirties is standing and playing the clarinet, facing the camera. His dark hair is parted to the side and he is wearing glasses. Both of his hands are on the clarinet and he is blowing into the instrument with his eyes partly closed. There is a microphone on the foreground next to the bell of the clarinet. Several other musicians can be partly seen on the background. In the corner on the right hangs a flag with white and red stripes and white stars on a blue background.
Clarinetist and bandleader Benny Goodman popularized many of the 1930s standards, including "Darn That Dream", "How Deep Is the Ocean", and "Stompin' at the Savoy".
  • "All the Things You Are"[4][10][40][173] is a song from Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's Broadway musical Very Warm for May. Kern first felt the song, with its constantly shifting tonal centers, was too complex for mass appeal. However, it has enjoyed lasting popularity since then and is now one of the most recorded standards.[174] The song's chord progression has been used for such tunes as "Bird of Paradise" by Charlie Parker and "Prince Albert" by Kenny Dorham.
  • "Darn That Dream"[40][175] was composed by Jimmy Van Heusen for the Broadway musical Swingin' the Dream. Lyrics were written by Eddie DeLange. Although the musical was a disappointment, Benny Goodman's version of the song featuring vocalist Mildred Bailey was a number one hit.[176]
  • "Frenesi"[4][177][178] is a Latin jazz composition by Alberto Dominguez. Originally composed for the marimba, jazz arrangements were later made by Leonard Whitcup and others. A 1940 hit version recorded by Artie Shaw with an arrangement by William Grant Still was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2000.[9]
  • "I Didn't Know What Time It Was"[179] was sung by Richard Kollmar and Marcy Westcott in the Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart musical Too Many Girls. Benny Goodman recorded the first jazz version in 1939 with vocalist Louise Tobin.[180]
  • "I Thought About You"[4][40][181][182] was composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. Mildred Bailey recorded the first hit version with the Benny Goodman Orchestra. Guitarist Johnny Smith recorded it in the 1950s for the Roost label. Miles Davis included the song on his 1961 album Someday My Prince Will Come.[183]
  • "In the Mood"[184][185] is a jazz composition by Joe Garland based on Wingy Manone's "Tar Paper Stomp". Andy Razaf wrote the lyrics for the song. Garland recorded "In the Mood" with Edgar Hayes and offered it to Artie Shaw, who never recorded the piece. It was popularized by the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1939. The final arrangement was the result of work by Garland, Miller, Eddie Durham, and pianist Chummy MacGregor, although only Miller profited from its financial success.[186] The song remains popular and is almost always performed as an instrumental.[187]
  • "Moonlight Serenade"[10][188][189] was composed by Glenn Miller with lyrics by Mitchell Parish. Miller's orchestra used it as their signature tune,[190] and their recording charted at number three in 1939.[191] The song was recorded by rhythm and blues group The Rivieras in 1959.[191] Carly Simon sang it on her 2005 album Moonlight Serenade.[192]
  • "Over the Rainbow"[10][193] is a ballad introduced by Judy Garland in the film The Wizard of Oz, composed by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Yip Harburg. It was an immediate hit: four different versions, including Garland's, rose to top ten within a month after the film's release. An influential piano solo recording was made by Art Tatum in 1955, and a live solo piano recording was released by singer-songwriter Tori Amos in 1996. The song is also known as "Somewhere over the Rainbow".[194]
  • "Something to Live For"[195] is a jazz ballad written by Billy Strayhorn. Based on a poem the composer had written as a teenager,[196] the song was introduced by Duke Ellington's orchestra with composer Strayhorn on the piano. Ellington was co-credited with the composition.[197] The song has been recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, who has called it her favorite song.[198]
  • "What's New?"[4][10][40][199] started out as an instrumental titled "I'm Free", composed by Bob Haggart when he was playing in Bob Crosby's Orchestra, and was later retitled when Johnny Burke wrote lyrics for it. The song was introduced by Crosby, and other hit versions from 1939 include Bing Crosby's and Benny Goodman's renditions.[200] Australian singer Catherine O'Hara recorded the song in 1966 with her own lyrics, also titled "I'm Free".[200]
  • "Woodchopper's Ball"[201] is a jazz composition by Joe Bishop and Woody Herman. Introduced by the Woody Herman Orchestra, it was the band's first and biggest hit selling over a million records.[202][203] The original recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002.[9] The composition is also known as "At the Woodchopper's Ball".[203]

Notes[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "Body and Soul". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  3. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Jazz History: The Standards (1930s)". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 16 September 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Listed in The Real Vocal Book.
  5. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 57.
  6. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 29.
  7. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 55.
  8. ^ Kirchner 2005, p. 185
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "Grammy Hall of Fame". Grammy.com. Retrieved 2 April 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah Listed in The Real Jazz Book.
  11. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "But Not for Me". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  12. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 185.
  13. ^ a b c d Burlingame, Sandra. "I'm Confessin' That I Love You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  14. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Embraceable You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  15. ^ The Real Book, Volume III, p. 116.
  16. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 98.
  17. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Exactly Like You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 5 May 2009. 
  18. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 145.
  19. ^ a b Wilson, Jeremy. "Georgia on My Mind". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  20. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "I Got Rhythm". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  21. ^ Greenberg 1998, pp. 152–155
  22. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "Love for Sale". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  23. ^ Wilder & Maher 1972, p. 229
  24. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 260.
  25. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 202.
  26. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "Memories of You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  27. ^ Dryden, Ken. "Memories of You". Allmusic. Retrieved 31 August 2010. 
  28. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 279.
  29. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 214.
  30. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Mood Indigo". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  31. ^ Holden, Stephen (1 February 1987). "Theater; Mitchell Parish: A Way with Words". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 October 2011. 
  32. ^ Tucker & Ellington 1995, pp. 338–340
  33. ^ Bradbury 2005, p. 31
  34. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 298
  35. ^ The Real Book, Volume III, p. 312
  36. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 277.
  37. ^ a b c d Wilson, Jeremy. "On the Sunny Side of the Street". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  38. ^ Forte 1995, p. 251
  39. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 20.
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Listed in The New Real Book, Volume I.
  41. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "All of Me". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  42. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "I Surrender Dear". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  43. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 193.
  44. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Just Friends". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  45. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 242.
  46. ^ a b "Lazy River". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  47. ^ a b Studwell & Baldin 2000, p. 127
  48. ^ Matthew Greenwald. "Lazy River song review". Allmusic. Retrieved 3 May 2009. 
  49. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 318.
  50. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Out of Nowhere". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  51. ^ a b "When It's Sleepy Time Down South". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  52. ^ Clayton 1995, p. 61
  53. ^ Bogdanov, Woodstra & Erlewine 2002, p. 42
  54. ^ Hersch 2008, p. 199
  55. ^ Burlingame, Sandra. "When Your Lover Has Gone". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  56. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Alone Together". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  57. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 32
  58. ^ a b c Burlingame, Sandra. "April in Paris". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 13 December 2010. 
  59. ^ The Real Book, Volume III, p. 150.
  60. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "How Deep Is the Ocean? (How High Is the Sky?)". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  61. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 173.
  62. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 132.
  63. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "(I Don't Stand a) Ghost of a Chance (With You)". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  64. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 224.
  65. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 161.
  66. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "It Don't Mean A Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  67. ^ "New Orleans". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  68. ^ Sudhalter 2003, p. 151
  69. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Night and Day". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  70. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 426.
  71. ^ a b c d Wilson, Jeremy. "Willow Weep for Me". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  72. ^ "Willow Weep for Me". Allmusic. Retrieved 29 May 2009. 
  73. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 121.
  74. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 111.
  75. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Don't Blame Me". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  76. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "I Cover the Waterfront". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  77. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 209.
  78. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 162.
  79. ^ Tyle, Chris. "It's Only a Paper Moon". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  80. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 376.
  81. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 337.
  82. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Sophisticated Lady". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  83. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 454.
  84. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Yesterdays". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  85. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 38.
  86. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Autumn in New York". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 21 December 2010. 
  87. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 47.
  88. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Blue Moon". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  89. ^ "Influential Rock Musicians from 1951 to 1963". Aces and Eights. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  90. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 366.
  91. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 346
  92. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Solitude". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  93. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 354.
  94. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  95. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 354.
  96. ^ Burlingame, Sandra. "Stars Fell on Alabama". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  97. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 385.
  98. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 359.
  99. ^ a b Shaw 1989, p. 181
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Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Fake books[edit]

A fake book is a collection of musical lead sheets intended to help a performer quickly learn new songs.