List of 50/80cc Motorcycle World Champions

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A black and white picture stepping out of a bus with briefcases in his hands.
Ángel Nieto, who won six 50cc championships

Grand Prix motorcycle racing is the premier championship of motorcycle road racing, which has been divided into three classes since 1990: 125cc, 250cc and MotoGP. Classes that have been discontinued include 350cc, 50cc/80cc and sidecar.[1] The 50/80cc referred to the size of the engines of the motorcycles that raced in that class.[2] The Grand Prix Road Racing World Championship was established in 1949 by the sport's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM), and is the oldest motorsport World Championship.[2] The 50cc was introduced in 1962, 13 years after the start of the first world championships. The category was replaced by 80cc in 1984 and the class was subsequently discontinued in 1989.[3]

Each season consisted of five to ten Grands Prix contested on closed circuits, as opposed to public roads. Points earned in these events counted toward the drivers' and constructors' World Championships. The driver's and constructor's championship were separate championships, but were based on the same point system. The points systems used in the championship varied over the years. The first championship in 1962 awarded points from first to sixth place; a point was also awarded for the rider who completed the fastest lap. The last championship in 1989 awarded points from first to fifteenth place.[4] Results from all Grands Prix counted towards the championships; however, in some seasons only a certain number of results were counted.[5]

Ángel Nieto won the most championships during his career with six. Stefan Dörflinger won the second most championships with four, and Hans Georg Anscheidt and Jorge Martínez won the third most with three. Spanish riders won the most championships; four riders won a total of 12 championships. Swiss and German riders were second with four, while Ernst Degner won the inaugural championship in 1962. Manuel Herreros was the last champion before the class was discontinued in 1989.[6]

Champions[edit]

Key
double-dagger Champion also won the 125cc Championship in that season
Indicates that information is unavailable
  • The "Season" column refers to the season the competition was held, and wikilinks to the article about that season.
  • The "Margin" column refers to the margin of points by which the winner defeated the runner-up.

By season[edit]

50/80cc Motorcycle World Champions
Season Nationality Rider Constructor Grands Prix Poles Wins Podiums Fastest laps Points Margin
1962 West Germany West Germany Degner, ErnstErnst Degner Suzuki 10 &
4 5 4 41 5
1963 New Zealand New Zealand Anderson, HughHugh Andersondouble-dagger Suzuki 9 &
2 7 2 34 2
1964 New Zealand New Zealand Anderson, HughHugh Anderson Suzuki 9 &
4 6 4 38 8
1965 United Kingdom United Kingdom Bryans, RalphRalph Bryans Honda 8 &
3 5 1 36 4
1966 West Germany West Germany Anscheidt, Hans GeorgHans Georg Anscheidt Suzuki 6 &
2 4 3 28 2
1967 West Germany West Germany Anscheidt, Hans GeorgHans Georg Anscheidt Suzuki 7 &
3 6 1 30 2
1968 West Germany West Germany Anscheidt, Hans GeorgHans Georg Anscheidt Suzuki 5 &
3 4 2 30 13
1969 Spain Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nieto Derbi 10 &
2 6 4 76 1
1970 Spain Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nieto Derbi 10 &
5 7 5 87 12
1971 Netherlands Netherlands Vries, Jan deJan de Vries Kreidler 9 &
5 7 4 75 6
1972 Spain Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nietodouble-dagger[A] Derbi 8 &
3 6 5 69 0
1973 Netherlands Netherlands Vries, Jan deJan de Vries Kreidler 7 &
5 5 5 60 9
1974 Netherlands Netherlands Kessel, Henk vanHenk van Kessel Kreidler Van Veen 10 4 6 8 &
90 25
1975 Spain Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nieto Kreidler 8 1 6 8 &
75 14
1976 Spain Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nieto Bultaco 9 8 5 7 &
85 9
1977 Spain Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nieto Bultaco 7 4 3 7 &
87 15
1978 Spain Spain Tormo, RicardoRicardo Tormo Bultaco 7 4 5 7 &
99 35
1979 Italy Italy Lazzarini, EugenioEugenio Lazzarini Kreidler 7 4 5 5 &
75 13
1980 Italy Italy Lazzarini, EugenioEugenio Lazzarini Kreidler Van Veen 6 1 2 6 &
74 2
1981 Spain Spain Tormo, RicardoRicardo Tormo Bultaco 8 3 6 6 &
90 25
1982 Switzerland Switzerland Dörflinger, StefanStefan Dörflinger Kreidler 6 5 3 6 &
81 12
1983 Switzerland Switzerland Dörflinger, StefanStefan Dörflinger Krauser 7 4 3 6 &
81 12
1984 Switzerland Switzerland Dörflinger, StefanStefan Dörflinger Zündapp 8 5 4 5 &
82 7
1985 Switzerland Switzerland Dörflinger, StefanStefan Dörflinger Krauser 7 5 2 7 &
86 19
1986 Spain Spain Martínez, JorgeJorge Martínez Derbi 9 5 4 7 &
94 9
1987 Spain Spain Martínez, JorgeJorge Martínez Derbi 10 7 7 9 &
129 43
1988 Spain Spain Martínez, JorgeJorge Martínezdouble-dagger Derbi 7 7 6 7 &
137 40
1989 Spain Spain Herreros, ManuelManuel Herreros Derbi 6 0 0 4 &
92 12

Multiple champions[edit]

Multiple champions of the 50/80cc class
Rider Total Seasons
Spain Nieto, ÁngelÁngel Nieto 6 1969, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977
Switzerland Dörflinger, StefanStefan Dörflinger 4 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985
Germany Anscheidt, Hans GeorgHans Georg Anscheidt 3 1966, 1967, 1968
Spain Martínez, JorgeJorge Martínez 3 1986, 1987, 1988
New Zealand Anderson, HughHugh Anderson 2 1963, 1964
Netherlands de Vries, JanJan de Vries 2 1971, 1973
Spain Tormo, RicardoRicardo Tormo 2 1978, 1981
Italy Lazzarini, EugenioEugenio Lazzarini 2 1979, 1980

By constructor[edit]

50/80cc championships won by constructor
Constructor Total
Spain Derbi 7
Japan Suzuki 6
Germany Kreidler 5
Spain Bultaco 4
Germany Kreidler Van Veen 2
Germany Krauser 2
Japan Honda 1
Germany Zündapp 1

By nationality[edit]

50/80cc championships won by nationality
Nationality Riders Total
Spain Spanish 4 12
Switzerland Swiss 1 4
Germany German 2 4
Netherlands Dutch 2 3
Italy Italian 1 2
New Zealand New Zealander 1 2
United Kingdom British 1 1

Footnotes[edit]

A. ^ The points awarded in the 1962 championship were 8 points for a win, with 6, 4, 3, 2 and 1 point from second place to sixth place.[4]

B. ^ The points awarded to riders in the 1989 championship were 20 points for a win, with 17, 15, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1 point from second place to fifteenth place.[4]

C. ^ Ángel Nieto and Jan de Vries finished the 1972 championship tied on 69 points. Nieto and de Vries had both won three Grands Prix and finished second three times. As a result the championship was decided by adding up their times from the five races that the two had finished together. Nieto was declared the winner by 21.5 seconds.[7]

References[edit]

Bibliography

General

Specific

  1. ^ Marshall 1997, p. 289
  2. ^ a b "Basics". MotoGP. Retrieved 3 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "History". MotoGP. Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c Morrison 1991, p. 14
  5. ^ "Points". MotoGP. Retrieved 12 August 2011. 
  6. ^ Teitge, Stefan. "World 80cc championship overview". Motorsport–archive. Retrieved 7 May 2011. 
  7. ^ Walker 2000, p. 117