List of Abell clusters

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Abell 383, the giant cluster of elliptical galaxies in the centre of this image contains so much dark matter mass that itsgravity bends the light from a background object into an arc, a phenomenon known as strong gravitational lensing.

The Abell catalogue is an almost complete catalogue of approximately 4,000 galaxy clusters with at least 30 members to a redshift of z = 0.2. It was originally compiled by George O. Abell in 1958 using the plates of POSS, and extended to the southern hemisphere by Abell, Corwin and Olowin in 1987. The name 'Abell' also commonly is used as a designation for objects he compiled in a catalog of 86 planetary nebulae in 1966. The proper designation for the galaxy clusters is 'ACO' e.g. 'ACO 13'; while the planetary nebulae designation is the single letter 'A' e.g. 'A 39'.


1–1999[edit]

ACO catalog number Other names Member of Constellation Right ascension (J2000)[2] Declination (J2000)[2] Abell richness class[2][3] Bautz-Morgan type[2][3] Notes
13 00h 13m 38.5s −19° 30′ 19″ 2 II
85 00h 41m 37.8s −09° 20′ 33″ 1 I
133 Cetus 01h 02m 39.0s −21° 57′ 15″ 0
222 01h 37m 29.2s −12° 59′ 10″ 3 II-III
223 01h 37m 56.4s −12° 48′ 01″ 3 III
226 01h 38m 58.7s −10° 14′ 47″ 1 II
262 Between Andromeda and Triangulum 01h 52m 50.4s +36° 08′ 46″ 0 III
263 01h 53m 21.7s +37° 33′ 45″ 1
370 Cetus 02h 39m 50.5s −01° 35′ 08″ 0 II-III Exhibits gravitational lensing. The most distant Abell object, at a redshift of 0.375.
383 Eridanus 02h 48m 07.0s −03° 29′ 32″ 2 II-III
400 Cetus 02h 57m 38.6s +06° 02′ 00″ 1 II-III
401 Aries 02h 58m 57.0s +13° 34′ 56″ 2 I
426 Perseus Cluster Perseus 03h 18m 36.4s +41° 30′ 54″ 2 II-III
478 Taurus 04h 13m 20.7s +10° 28′ 35″ 2
514 04h 47m 40.1s −20° 25′ 44″ 1 II-III
520 Train Wreck Cluster Orion 04h 54m 19.0s +02° 56′ 49″ 3 III
553 06h 12m 37.5s +48° 36′ 13″ 0 II
569 07h 09m 10.4s +48° 37′ 10″ 0 II
576 Lynx 07h 21m 24.2s +55° 44′ 20″ 1 III
653 Hydra 08h 21m 47.0s +01° 13′ 23″ 1
665 Ursa Major 08h 30m 45.2s +65° 52′ 55″ 5 III The only Abell cluster of richness class 5.[4]
689 Cancer 08h 37m 29.7s +14° 59′ 29″ 0
754 Hydra 09h 08m 50.1s −09° 38′ 12″ 2 I-II
901 09h 56m 09.7s −09° 56′ 17″ 1
907 Hydra 09h 58m 21.2s −11° 03′ 22″ 1
955 10h 12m 56.0s −24° 26′ 53″ 1
966 10h 16m 13.8s −25° 22′ 59″ 1 III
1060 Hydra Cluster Hydra 10h 36m 51.3s −27° 31′ 35″ 1 III
1185 11h 10m 31.4s +28° 43′ 39″ 1 II
1146 Crater 11h 01m 20.6s −22° 43′ 08″ 4 I
1367 Leo Cluster Leo 11h 44m 29.5s +19° 50′ 21″ 2 II-III
1413 Between Leo and Coma Berenices 11h 55m 18.9s +23° 24′ 31″ 3 I
1631 12h 52m 49.8s −15° 26′ 17″ 0 I
1656 Coma Cluster Coma Berenices 12h 59m 48.7s +27° 58′ 50″ 2 II
1689 Virgo 13h 11m 29.5s −01° 20′ 17″ 4 II-III One of the biggest and most massive galaxy clusters known; exhibits gravitational lensing.
1795 Boötes 13h 49m 00.5s +26° 35′ 07″ 2 I
1835 Virgo 14h 01m 02.0s +02° 51′ 32″ 0 Behind it lies a candidate for the furthest known galaxy, "Galaxy Abell 1835 IR1916", seen through gravitational lensing.
1914 Boötes 14h 26m 03.0s +37° 49′ 32″ 2 II
1991 Boötes 14h 54m 30.2s +18° 37′ 51″ 1 I

2000–4076[edit]

ACO catalog number Other names Member of Constellation Right ascension (J2000) Declination (J2000) Abell richness class Bautz-Morgan type Notes
2029 Virgo 15h 10m 56.0s +05° 44′ 41″ 2 I Near the SerpensVirgo border.
2052 15h 16m 45.5s +07° 00′ 01″ 0 I-II
2061 Corona Borealis Supercluster 15h 21m 15.3s +30° 39′ 17″ 1 III
2065 Corona Borealis Cluster Corona Borealis Supercluster 15h 22m 42.6s +27° 43′ 21″ 2 III
2142 Corona Borealis 15h 58m 16.1s +27° 13′ 29″ 2 II A merger of two huge galaxy clusters.
2147 Hercules Superclusters Serpens 16h 02m 17.2s +15° 53′ 43″ 1 III
2151 Hercules Cluster Hercules Superclusters Hercules 16h 05m 15.0s +17° 44′ 55″ 2 III Major component of the Hercules Superclusters.
2152 Hercules Superclusters 16h 05m 22.4s +16° 26′ 55″ 1 III The smaller part of the Hercules supercluster, Lx ≤ 3 x 1044 ergs/s.[5]
2163 Ophiuchus 16h 15m 34.1s −06° 07′ 26″ 2
2199 Hercules 16h 28m 38.5s +39° 33′ 06″ 2 I
2200 Hercules 16h 29m 24.7s +28° 10′ 30″ 0
2218 Draco 16h 35m 54.0s +66° 13′ 00″ 4 II Exhibits gravitational lensing.
2256 Ursa Minor 17h 03m 43.5s +78° 43′ 03″ 2 II-III
2261 Abell 2261-BCG Hercules 17h 22m 28.34s +32° 09′ 12.67″ I Part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) survey.
2319 Cygnus 19h 20m 45.3s +43° 57′ 43″ 1 II-III Very close to, and possibly extending into, Lyra.
2384 Capricornus 21h 52m 18.9s −19° 34′ 42″ 1 II-III
2390 Pegasus 21h 53m 34.6s +17° 40′ 11″ 1
2440 22h 23m 52.6s −01° 35′ 47″ 0 II
2589 Pegasus 23h 24m 00.5s +16° 49′ 29″ 0 I
2666 23h 50m 56.2s +27° 08′ 41″ 0 I
2667 Sculptor 23h 51m 47.1s −26° 00′ 18″ 3 I Exhibits strong gravitational lensing.
2744 Pandora’s Cluster Sculptor 00h 14m 19.5s −30° 23′ 19″ 3 III It seems to have formed from four different clusters involved in a series of collisions over a period of some 350 million years.[6]
3128 Shapley 20 Cluster 03h 30m 34.6s −52° 33′ 12″ 3 I-II
3158 Shapley 17 Cluster 03h 42m 39.6s −53° 37′ 50″ 2 I-II
3266 Horologium Supercluster Reticulum 04h 31m 11.9s −61° 24′ 23″ 2 I-II
3341 05h 25m 35.1s −31° 35′ 26″ 2 II
3363 05h 45m 07.8s −47° 56′ 52″ 3 I
3526 Centaurus Cluster Centaurus 12h 48m 51.8s −41° 18′ 21″ 0 I-II
3558 Shapley 8 Cluster 13h 27m 54.8s −31° 29′ 32″ 4 I
3562 Shapley Supercluster 13h 33m 31.8s −31° 40′ 23″ 2 I
3565 Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster 13h 36m 39.9s −33° 58′ 17″ 1 I
3574 Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster 13h 49m 09.4s −30° 17′ 54″ 0 I
3581 Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster 14h 07m 27.5s −27° 01′ 15″ 0 I
3627 Norma Cluster Norma 16h 15m 32.8s −60° 54′ 30″ 1 I
3854 22h 17m 42.9s −35° 42′ 58″ 3 II
4059 23h 56m 40.7s −34° 40′ 18″ 1 I

Southern catalogue S1–S1174[edit]

ACO catalog number Other names Member of Constellation Right ascension (J2000) Declination (J2000) Abell richness class Bautz-Morgan type Notes
S636 Antlia Cluster Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster Antlia 10h 30m 03.5s −35° 19′ 24″ 0 I-II
S740 Centaurus 13h 43m 32.3s −38° 11′ 05″ 0 I-II
S1077 Piscis Austrinus 22h 58m 52.3s −34° 46′ 55″ 2 II-III

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clavin, Whitney; Jenkins, Ann; Villard, Ray (7 January 2014). "NASA's Hubble and Spitzer Team up to Probe Faraway Galaxies". NASA. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). Retrieved March 15, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "The VizieR Catalogue Service". Strasbourg Astronomical Observatory, UdS/CNRS, Strasbourg, France. Retrieved March 15, 2012. 
  4. ^ Abell, George O.; Corwin, Harold G., Jr.; Olowin, Ronald P. (May 1989). "A catalog of rich clusters of galaxies" (PDF). Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 70 (May 1989): 1–138. Bibcode:1989ApJS...70....1A. doi:10.1086/191333. ISSN 0067-0049. Retrieved March 16, 2012. 
  5. ^ Reichert G, Mason KO, Charles PA, Bowyer S, Lea SM, Pravdo S (Aug 1981). "Low energy X-ray emission from five galaxy cluster sources". Ap J. 247: 803–12. Bibcode:1981ApJ...247..803R. doi:10.1086/159092. 
  6. ^ ESO-A Galactic Crash Investigation

External links[edit]