List of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community buildings and structures

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Mosques of the Ahmadiyya

This is a list of mosques, hospitals, schools and other structures throughout the world that are constructed/owned by the Ahmadiyya Community, arranged according to their respective countries. Additional information pertaining to the countries is also included.

As of 2009, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community has built over 15,055 mosques,[1] 510 schools, and over 30 hospitals.[2][3] The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is established in 195 countries of the world.[4]

Asia[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community originated in India in 1889, with the birth of the Community taking place in Qadian, India.[5] As of 2008 the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community has been established in all Asian countries except for Tajikistan, Turkmenistan (established 2010), Georgia and North Korea.[6]

Rabwah (Pakistan)[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself in Rabwah on September 30, 1948.[7][8] Rabwah was a town founded and created from scratch by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in the time of its Second Caliph, Mirza Basheer-ud-Din Mahmood Ahmad and was named ‘Rabwah’ by the Ahmadiyya Missionary Jalal-ud-Din Shams (the author of the famous book “Where Did Jesus Die?” and companion of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad) because ‘rabwah’ in Arabic means ‘elevated/exalted place’ and thus, Jalal-ud-Din Shams coined for the town Rabwah because of the narration in the Qur’an of Jesus being exalted/elevated towards God.[9] Rabwah acted as the International Headquarters of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community after the India-Pakistan partition and before the migration of the Fourth Khalifa (International Head) of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Mirza Tahir Ahmad to Europe in London, England, due to the government of Pakistan’s on-going Anti-Ahmadiyya laws. England is the present location of the International administrative Headquarters of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.[10]

Bangladesh[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1913.[20]
  • The Bangali Ahmadiyya Community currently has 103 local chapters across the country, in 425 cities and villages.[21]
  • There are 65 missionaries, an MTA (Muslim Television Ahmadiyya) studio in Dhaka and a Jamia Ahmadiyya (Missionary Training College).[21]
  • Maharajpur Mosque in the Natore District[22]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque in Khulna[22]
  • Galim Gazi Mosque in Betal, Kishoregonj[22]
  • Madaratek Mosque in Dhaka[22]
  • Masjid Baitul Baset, in Chittagong.

Bhutan[edit]

  • An Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque was constructed in Bhutan in 2008.[23]

Cambodia[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 2001.[24]
  • At-Taqwa Mosque[25]
  • Baitul Awwal Mosque[25]
  • In 2001, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced to a small village in Cambodia called Minchey, which is 70 km from Phnom Penh. All 252 residents of the village converted to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.[26]
  • Nooruddin Mosque inaugurated on March 14, 2004[26]

India[edit]




Qadian[edit]

The White Minaret of Qadian

Indonesia[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1925.[37]
  • Jamia Ahmadiyya established in March 1982.[7]
  • Nasir Mosque in Indonesia[38]
  • An-Noor Mosque in Indonesia[38]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Guest Quarters and Mission House in Indonesia[38]
  • Currently, there are over 200,000 Ahmadis in Indonesia with 200 missionaries, and more than 300 local branches.[39]
  • There are currently 385 mosques, 174 mission houses and 36 schools built by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Indonesia[39]
Ahmadiyya Mosque in Haifa

Israel[edit]

.[40]

Japan[edit]

Kazakhstan[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1991.[44]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission House and Mosque in Almaty[45]

Malaysia[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1935.[46]
  • Bait-us-Salam Mosque in Kuala Lumpur[46]

Myanmar[edit]

Nepal[edit]

  • An Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque was constructed in Nepal in 2008.[23]

Philippines[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1985.[49]
  • Ahmadiyya Mission House in Manila[49]
  • The Philippines Ahmadiyya Community currently has 6 mosques, 5 mission houses, 5 local missionaries, 1 national missionary and is organized in 9 local chapters throughout the country.[49]

Russia[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1924.[50]
  • Ahmadiyya Mission House in St. Petersburg[51]

Singapore[edit]

Sri Lanka[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1915.[54]
  • Fazal Mosque in Negombo[55]
  • Bait-ul-Hamd Mosque in Colombo which acts as the national headquarters of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Sri Lanka[55]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Centre in Slave Island[56]

Thailand[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1986.[57]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission House in Bangkok[51]

Turkmenistan[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 2010.

Africa[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community had been established in all African countries by the year 2000.[58] The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced to Africa when several individuals living in East Africa became Ahmadis in 1900, during the life of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad.[58]

Bénin[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1957.[59]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Agonlin.[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Togouihoue.[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Lalo.[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Papatia.[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Manigri.[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Oke-Owo[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Godogossoun[60]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Suya.[60]
  • Al-Mahdi mosque which is the largest mosque in Bénin, inaugurated April 27, 2008.[61]
  • Baitul Tauheed Mosque inaugurated in 2004.[62]
  • In 1993, 10,000 converts to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community from Bénin.[63]
  • In 2000, 801,000 converts.[63]
  • In 2001, over 1.2 million converts, 328 local branches established within all 328 cities within the country, 228 chiefs and kings converted and 237 Sunni converted Ahmadiyya mosques along with their Imams.[63]
  • Bénin currently has 251 Ahmadiyya mosques, 77 mission houses and over 2 million adherents of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. As of 2002, 57 kings of various Beninous communities joined the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.[64]

Burkina Faso[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1986.[65]
  • Al Mahdi Mosque in Ougadougou[65]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque in Koudougou[65]
  • Ahmadiyya Islamic Radio Satation established (Radio Islamique Ahmadiyya FM104.1)[66]

Côte d’Ivoire[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1961.[67]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Dagara located in the Dabakala district of the Vallée du Bandama region.[67]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Bouaké.[68]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Adjamé
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in San Pedro
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Abengourou
  • Ahmadiyya Hospital in Adjamé
  • Ahmadiyya Primary Schools in Ajamé and Yopougon
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Grand Bassam
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Oumé

The Gambia[edit]

Ghana[edit]

Kenya[edit]

Lesotho[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1999.[82]
  • Baitul Mahdi Mosque in Thaba-Bosiu[82]
  • Currently 350 Ahmadis in Lesotho in 7 local branches.[83]

Liberia[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1956.[84]
  • A college professor is the first convert to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in 1917.[85]
  • Baitul Mujeeb Mosque in Monrovia. It was originally built in 1986 but suffered fire damage in 1996 during the First Liberian Civil War. It was reconstructed on July 7, 2000.[84]
  • Foundation stone laid for Tubmanburg Mosque in 2007[86]
  • Ahmadiyya Mission House in Gohn Town, Grand Cape Mount County[87]
  • Ahmadiyya Central Library in Monrovia inaugurated in 2008[87]

Madagascar[edit]

Mauritius[edit]

Rodrigues Island

  • Mahmood Mosque, La ferme[93]
  • Noor mosque, Port Mathurin

Niger[edit]

Nigeria[edit]

Sierra Leone[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1937.[101]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Gbonkobana[101]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Gbendembu[102]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Kailahun[102]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Makeni[102]
  • Ahmadiyya Mosque in Bo[102]
  • Currently, there are 573 mosques, 19 central missionaries, 131 local missionaries, 184 Ahmadiyya primary schools and 50 secondary schools in Sierra Leone[102]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Radio Station established in 2007[102]

South Africa[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1946.[103]
  • Baitul Awwal Mosque in Cape Town[103]

Swaziland[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1997.[104]
  • Baitul Hadi Mosque in Hiatikulu, which is the first Ahmadiyya mosque in Swaziland and the only mosque in the region whereupon the mosque is located in.[104]
  • There are presently over 250 Ahmadis in Swaziland[83]

Tanzania[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1934.[105]
  • Qur’an translated into Swahili in 1936[106]
  • Ahmadiyya newspaper established in 1936 called ‘Mapenzi ya Munga’ (The Love of God).[106]
  • The first ever English language Muslim newspaper called ‘East African Times’ established by the late MM Ahmad (former vice-president of the World Bank, Pakistani civil servant, Amir of the USA Ahmadiyya Community and Amir of East African countries. He translated the Qur’an into Swahili)[106]
  • Ahmadiyya Primary School opened in 1940[106]
  • Tanzania was formerly named ‘Tangantika’. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was involved with the struggle of independence of the country and an Ahmadi, Mohammed Iqbal Dar, coined the name ‘Tanzania’ for the country.[106]
  • Kitonga Ahmadiyya Mosque in Dar-es-Salaam[106]
  • Salam Mosque in Dar-es-Salaam[107]
  • Baitul Hamid Mosque in Dodoma[107]
  • Fazal Mosque inaugurated in 1947 in Tabora, which is popularly known as the ‘Taj Mahal of East Africa’[106]

Uganda[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1935.[108]
  • Oil found in Uganda for the first time in history due to the help offered by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.[109]
  • Ahmadiyya Central Mosque in Kampala which has 6 minarets and can hold up to 9,000 worshippers.[110]
  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque in Iganga[110]
  • There are several mosques, high schools, elementary schools in Uganda and also a hospital in the town of Mbale which has a maternity ward and modern radiology technology, established by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Uganda[111]
  • Qur’an translated into the local Ugandan language.[111]

Europe[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced to Europe in 1907 when, in response to Mirza Ghulam Ahmad’s messages to Europe, a German woman converted to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.[112] The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is currently established in all European countries except for Latvia, Slovakia and Greece, though there are individual members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community within the latter which consist of mostly Arabs and a small number of indigenous Greeks.[113]

Albania[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in c. 1934.[114]

Austria[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in c. 1936.[116] Website: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Austria

Belgium[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in c. 1982.[118] Website: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Belgium

Baitus Salam in Sarajewo

Bosnia and Herzegovina[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1996.[120]
  • Baitul Salam in Sarajevo[121]
Nusrat Jehan Mosque in Copenhagen

Denmark[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1959.[122]

Faroe Islands[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 2010.

France[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1946.[124] Website: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community France

Germany[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1923 in Berlin. (52°39′15.2″N 13°18′41.5″E / 52.654222°N 13.311528°E / 52.654222; 13.311528)[7][126] Website: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Germany

Baden-Württemberg

Bavaria

Berlin

Bremen

Fazle Omar Mosque in Hamburg

Hamburg

Noor Mosque in Frankfurt

Hesse

Lower Saxony

North Rhine-Westphalia

Rhineland-Palitanate

Schleswig-Holstein

Ireland[edit]

Kosovo[edit]

Luxembourg-Grand-Duché de Luxembourg[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 2012.

Website: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Luxembourg

The Netherlands[edit]

Mosque in Oslo

Norway[edit]

More about the community in Norway http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya and http://www.alislam.no

Portugal[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1957.[158]
  • Ahmadiyya Mission House[159]

Spain[edit]

Sweden[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1956.[162]
  • Nasir Mosque in Gothenburg built in 1963[163] August 20, 1976[7]

Switzerland[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

The first mosque built in London in 1924
Baitul Futuh in London

Greater London

  • The first mosque built in London in 1924, Fazl Mosque is the only mosque to date with the distinction of being called ‘The London Mosque’ and serves as the National Headquarters of the UK Ahmadiyya Community.[171]
  • The largest mosque in Western Europe, built in 2003, Baitul Futuh “House of Victories” is located south of London in Morden, Surrey and serves as the International Headquarters of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community at large. It was mentioned as one of the top 50 buildings in the world in the periodical “The Informer”.[172]
  • Baitus Subhan Mosque in Croydon[169]
  • Earlsfield Mosque in Earlsfield[167]
  • Baitul Ahad Mosque in East London[169]
  • Baitus Salam Mosque in Southall[169]
  • Baitun Noor Mosque in Hounslow[169]
  • Ahmadiyya Center in Tooting[167]

Birmingham

Bradford

Gillingham

Leamington Spa

  • Baitul Ehsan Mosque[175]

Manchester

Oxford

  • Baitul Shukoor Mosque[174]

Sheffield

  • Baitul Aafiyat Mosque[176]

Huddersfield

  • Baitus Samad Mosque[176]

Hartlepool

North America[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced to North America in 1921, with the pioneering efforts of the missionary Mufti Muhammad Sadiq.[178] The first country to receive the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was the USA where it appealed mainly to the African-American population though with some Caucasian converts.[179] Many eminent jazz musicians converted to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community like Sahib Shihab, Art Blakey (Abdullah ibn Buhaina) and Yusef Lateef.[179]

Canada[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1963.[180] Website: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Canada. It has about 50 Local Chapters scattred across the country concentrating mainly in southern Ontario. The community has great relationship with the gouvernment and helps in humanitarian causes regularly across the country. Apart from this, the community is very active in faith outreach and has held hundreds of interfaith religious events across the country as far north as Yellowknife and White Horse.
Name Images Province City Year G Remarks
Baitun Nur
Ahmadiyya Mosque 05a.jpg
Alberta Calgary 2008 AMJ *“House of Light” Mosque opened in 2008 in Calgary, which is currently the largest mosque in Canada.[181][182][183]
Baitul Hadi Mosque Alberta Edmonton AMJ currently serves the local chapter of Ahmadiyya Muslim in Edmonton.[184]
Jamaat Ahmadiyya Mosque Alberta Lloydminster 2011/2012 AMJ Jamaat Ahmadiyya Loydminister is currently working on completing a mosque which has been newly planned and will be serving the local Ahmadiyya Muslim Chapter of Loydminister.
Baitur Rehman British Columbia Delta, 2013 AMJ The Mosque serves the Vancouver Ahmadiyya Muslim Local Chapters Masjid: Baitur Rehman.[184]
Ahmaddiya Centre Mosque Manitoba Winnipeg AMJ The Ahmaddiya Centre-Mosque in Winnipeg serves the local Ahmadiyya Chapter of Wnnipeg.[185]
Ahmadiyya Muslim Center Saskatchewan Regina 2011/2012 AMJ Located in the City Center, an official mosque is under construction in the city on a bought plot the contract for which was signed in July 2011[184]
Darur Rahmat Mosque Saskatchewan Saskatoon, SK AMJ *currently serves the local chapter of Saskatoon but a much larger mosque is under construction in the south eastern sub urban area on a 5 acre plot which has alreday been brought. The foundation stone was laid early during the time of the fourth Khalifa.[184]
Baitul Hafeez Mosque Nova Scotia Sydney, Nova Scotia 2004 AMJ *The Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat of Sydney Chapter's mosque currently serves as the center of the Jamaat for Eastern Canada.
Mission House Nova Scotia Sydney, Nova Scotia 2004 AMJ *The Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat of Sydney Chapter's Mission House (2009), which is adjacent to Baitul Hafeez Mosque, is furnished and surves as a guest house for visitors from outside Nova Scotia.
Ahmadiyya Abode of Peace Ontario North York AMJ *A 14 story building run by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and predominantly inhabbited by Ahmadis making up 98 percent of the nearly 150 families living in the building. A hall on the first floor of the building serves as the gathering center for the local chapter.[186]
Bait-ul Kareem Mosque Ontario Cambridge Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario 2006 AMJ local mosque for the Ahmadi Muslim Community's local chapter; It was bought as a church and converted to a mosque. .[184]
Baitul Mahdi Ontario Durham Oshawa 2005/6 AMJ * A converted Mosque from a Dutch style castle was brought by a member of the Jamaat in 2005 and later donated to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to serve as Mosque and center for the local chapters of Oshawa and Durham. The property includes a 25 acre plot and has also regularly used by the Jamaat for regional sports events. The opening of the Masjid Al Mahdi took place in July 2006 during the visit of Khalifatul Masih the fifth to Canada.[186]
Bait-ul Islam “House of Islam (Peace and Submission)” Ontario Maple, Toronto, 1992 AMJ
Baitul Hamd
Jamia Ahmadiyya North America, in Mississauga, Canada.jpg
Ontario Mississauga Toronto, 1999 AMJ * Also serves as Jamia Ahmadiyya for North America which is due to change in early 2012 as the Jamia will switch to the Headquarters in Maple Ontario. The complex has one large hall, a cafeteria, a library, several offices for local and regional chapters of the community and of Jamia Ahmadiyya North America as well. The second floors includes many class rooms as well.[188]
Bait-ul Hanif Mosque Mosque on Victoria Park Toronto.jpg Ontario Toronto AMJ * the oldest mosque of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in its eastern GTA and serves as the local mosque for the local chapter of Toronto East.[189]
Bait-ul Ehsaan Mosque Ontario Windsor AMJ a primary school building which includes a Gym, several class rooms and small school field in the back lot was bought by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. The Masjid serves as the local Ahmadiyya Muslim chapter.[189]
Baitul Afiyat Mosque Ontario Scarborough Markham 2008 AMJ *An old church was bought and turned to a masjid in November 2008. The property was first build in 1865 and is presently serving as a local Mosque and gathering place for The Ahmadiyya Muslim local chapter of Scarborough and Markham. The center also serves as the regional center for the community in GTA East.
Bait-ul Noor Mosque Hamilton Downtown Mosque.JPG Ontario Hamilton AMJ serves as the Mosque for the Local Ahmadiyya Muslim Chapters of Hamilton South and Hamilton North.
Brampton Mosque Ontario Brampton 2005 AMJ *Foundation stone laid for Brampton Mosque in 2005. When completed, it will have a larger interior than that of Bait-ul Islam Mosque in Maple.[182]
Hadeeqa-e-Ahmad Ontario Bradford, Ontario AMJ *Ahmadiyya Muslim Center consists of a large detached house on 250 acres of land which was bought by the community to serve as a Jalsa facility and a Moosian Graveyard. The land is used to grow corn and carrots. An orchard of 900 trees grows apples, pears and cherries.[184]
Jamaat Center Ontario Cornwall 2005 AMJ The center serves as a Prayer space and auxiliary function to the local Ahmadiyya Muslim Chapter of Cornwall.
Malton Prayer Centre Ontario Malton in Mississauga, Toronto.[184] 2007 AMJ Serves as the local prayer center for over 150 families in Malton, and is widely used each week, there are two halls which can allocate a maximum of 120 people in hall one, and 80 people in hall two.
Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque (Ahmadiyya Muslim Association)[190] Ontario East Ottawa AMJ
Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque Kanata (Ahmadiyya Muslim Association)[190] Ontario West Ottawa AMJ
St Catherine Jamaat Center Ontario St Catherine AMJ *Located just out in the eastern suburbs of the city in the Niagara region. The mosque is a converted detached house on a 4 acre plot which also has an apple and cherry orchard.
Al Nusrat Mosque Quebec Montreal AMJ *Located in the north center part of the Island of Montreal, the current Masjid was a former Banquet Hall facility and consists of three halls and a large commercial kitchen. The building currently has several shops on rent by the Jamaat which are due to change when their contracts are finished.[182]
Mission House Quebec Quebec City, Quebec 2008 AMJ *Several Families have moved in the area since 2008; Maulana Isaac Fonsica Sahib serves as the local Imam.

United States of America[edit]

Arizona

California

American Fazl Mosque in Washington, D.C.

Connecticut

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Illinois

Louisiana

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Missouri

  • Sadiq Mosque in St. Louis which is currently under construction.[199]

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Texas

Washington

Wisconsin

South America[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced to South America in the 1950s, beginning with its presence on the island nation of Trinidad & Tobago in 1952.[210] It is now on established in all of South America except for Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, and Panama.[211]

Brazil[edit]

French Antilles[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 2002.[213]
  • Guadeloupe Mission House in Guadeloupe[213]

Guatemala[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1989.[214]
  • Baitul Awal in Guatemala, inaugurated on July 3, 1989 in celebration of the centenary of the creation of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in 1889[214]

Guyana[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1956.[215]
  • Baitul Noor[215]

Suriname[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1956.[216]
  • Nasir Mosque which is one of the largest mosques in Suriname, established in 1971.[216]
  • Nasar Mosque established in 1984.[217]

Trinidad & Tobago[edit]

Oceania[edit]

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced to Oceania in the 1920s. Since then, it has expanded to several island nations such as Tuvalu, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Nauru, Micronesia, Guam, Palau, New Zealand, and the Fiji Islands.[220]

Australia[edit]

Baitul Huda in Sydney, Australia
  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was introduced here around the 1920s.[221]

Sydney

  • Baitul Huda Mosque, which acts as the National Headquarters of the Australian Ahmadiyya Community. It is one of the largest mosques in Australia and one of the first to ever be built there.[222] September 30, 1983[7]
  • Khilafat Centennial Hall, adjacent to the Baitul Huda Mosque.[223]
  • Hassan Musa Library, within Baitul Huda Mosque, named after the first Ahmadi convert from Australia, Sufi Hassan Musa Khan, who was also a companion of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad.[222]

Brisbane

  • Baitul Masroor Mosque[224]

Melbourne

  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Centre in Melbourne one of the largest Ahmadiyya community mosque in the world; it is a totally pillarless building, still under construction and scheduled to be complete in early 2011. The building was purchased in 2006.[224]

Fiji Islands[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community established itself here in 1960.[225]

Viti Levu

Vanua Levu

  • Aiwane Mustafa Lajna (Women’s) Hall in Samabula[227]
  • Fazl-e-Umar Mosque in Samabula which is the largest mosque in the South Pacific. It can hold thousands of worshippers and includes a library, community hall and other facilities.[227]

New Zealand[edit]

  • The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was formed in 1987 under the guidance of Hadrat Mirza Tahir Ahmad, Khalifatul Masih IV (rha).

Since then the community has purchased its own property in 1999 at 20 Dalgety Drive, Manukau Central 2104, Auckland, Zealand. Hadrat Mirza Tahir Ahmad, Khalifatul Masih IV named the new centre Bait ul Muqeet.

In 2010, the community opened a proper communal kitchen to serve the community and guests. This new communal kitchen (Langar Khana) of the Promised Messiah was completed in preparation for the community's Annual Convention to be held on 27–28 January 2012.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama'at NZ has constructed their first Historic mosque in Auckland. The mosque design was approved by Hadrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, Khalifatul Masih V (atba). He kindly named it Masjid Baitul Muqeet. On Friday, 1 November 2013, Hadrat Khailfatul Masih V (atba) officially inaugurated the mosque.

See also[edit]

100-Mosque-Plan in Germany

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques - A Set on Flickr
  2. ^ Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World: A Pictorial Presentation. Khilafat Centenary Edition; The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. 2008. p. 14. ISBN 978-1-882494-51-4. 
  3. ^ “Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 33
  4. ^ 118th Jalsa Salana Qadian
  5. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 116
  6. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 167
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l A Brief History of Ahmadiyya Movement
  8. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 44
  9. ^ a b c d Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 46
  10. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 47
  11. ^ panoramio.com: 1, 2
  12. ^ Rabwah Teachers Gallery
  13. ^ Tahir Heart Institute, Rabwah
  14. ^ Fazle Umar Hospital
  15. ^ Khilafat Library Entrance
  16. ^ panoramio.com: 1, 2, 3
  17. ^ Masjid Mehdi rebuilt after bomb attack (Gol Bazar Rabwah)
  18. ^ Yadgar Mosque, Rabwah
  19. ^ a b c d e f Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 48
  20. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 117
  21. ^ a b Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 118
  22. ^ a b c d Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 119
  23. ^ a b Khalifatul Masih V's speech in the Second Session of the Second Day of the International Jalsa Salana UK 2008
  24. ^ Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 121
  25. ^ a b Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 122
  26. ^ a b Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 123
  27. ^ a b Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around the World, pg. 124
  28. ^ [1]
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