List of Allied vessels struck by Japanese special attack weapons

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There were more than 400 Allied vessels struck by Japanese special attack weapons in the last twelve months of World War II, including some vessels that were struck as many as six times in one attack.[1] The one special weapon that is most often associated with World War II is the Japanese kamikaze aircraft. Kamikaze was used to describe the way the Japanese believed they would be victorious by destroying the Allied fleet by crashing aircraft into their ships. The word kamikaze originated as the name of major typhoons in 1274 and 1281, which dispersed Mongolian invasion fleets under Kublai Khan. The Allies referred to these special weapons as "suicide" attacks, and found it difficult to understand why an individual would intentionally crash an airplane into a ship, as the two cultures clashed in battle. Both Imperial Japanese Navy and Imperial Japanese Army had Special Attack Units organized specifically for this mission. Aircraft were not the only special attack weapons. Attack boats, suicide divers, and several types of submarines were also used to destroy ships and landing craft as the Allied forces advanced toward Japan.[2]

Kamikaze Aircraft[edit]

Yokosuka D4Y3 Suisei (Allied code name "Judy") Japanese dive bomber dives on the Essex (November 25, 1944)

Kamikaze (神風?, literally: "God wind"; common translation: "Divine wind") [kamikaꜜze] ( ), official name: Tokubetsu Kōgekitai (特別攻撃隊?), Tokkō Tai (特攻隊?) or Tokkō (特攻?) were suicide attacks by military aviators from the Empire of Japan against Allied naval vessels in the closing stages of the Pacific campaign of World War II, designed to destroy warships more effectively than was possible with conventional attacks. Numbers quoted vary, but at least 47 Allied vessels, from PT boats to escort carriers, were sunk by kamikaze attacks, and about 300 damaged. During World War II, nearly 3,000 kamikaze pilots were sacrificed.[3] About 14% of kamikaze attacks managed to hit a ship. The Japanese high command exaggerated the effectiveness of the tokko attacks, claiming six aircraft carriers, one escort aircraft carrier and ten battleships had been sunk.[3]

Standard IJN and IJA aircraft[edit]

Almost every make and model of aircraft were used as kamikazes.[3] The most often seen were the Mitsubishi A6M (Allied code name "Zeke"), Aichi D3A (Allied code name "Val"), Mitsubishi G4M (Allied code name "Betty"), Nakajima B5N (Allied code name "Kate"), Yokosuka P1Y (Allied code name "Francis"), although in the final months of the war, every flyable aircraft was used. The Army used the Kawasaki Ki-61 (Allied code name "Tony"), Mitsubishi Ki-46 (Allied code name "Dinah"), although like the Navy, all available aircraft were to be used as the threat to Japan increased after Iwo Jima fell.[4]

Ohka at the Yasukuni Shrine

Ohka[edit]

The Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka (also spelled Oka) (櫻花; Shinjitai: 桜花; "cherry blossom"; Hebon-shiki transcription Ōka) was a purpose-built kamikaze aircraft employed by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service in the last months of World War II.[3] US forces gave the aircraft the Japanese name Baka which loosely translates as "idiot" or "fool" in English.

Ohka was a small flying bomb that was carried underneath a Mitsubishi G4M "Betty", Yokosuka P1Y Ginga "Frances" or the planned Heavy Nakajima G8N Renzan (Allied code name "Rita") transport type 43A/B and heavy bomber to within range of its target; on release, the pilot would first glide towards the target and, when close, enough he would fire the Ohka's engine(s) and dive into the ship to destroy it.[5] That final approach was almost unstoppable (especially for the rocket-powered Ohka Type 11) because the aircraft was capable of attaining tremendous speed. Later versions were designed to be launched from coastal air bases and caves, and even from submarines equipped with aircraft catapults, although the war ended before they were used this way.

Tsurugi[edit]

Ki-115 Tsurugi with propeller removed at the end of the war.

The Nakajima Ki-115 Tsurugi (剣 "Sabre") was a one-man purpose-built kamikaze aircraft developed by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force in the closing stages of World War II in late 1945.[6] More than 100 Ki-115s were completed.

Toka[edit]

The Toka (藤花, "Wisteria Blossom") was the IJN version of the Nakajima Ki-115 Ko. Showa was to build the Toka for the IJN.[7]

J8M Shusui "Sword Stroke"

Shusui[edit]

The Mitsubishi J8M Shūsui (Japanese: 三菱 J8M 秋水, literally "Autumn Water", used as a poetic term meaning "Sharp Sword" deriving from the swishing sound swords make) used by the Navy and Ki-200 for the Army. The Shusui ("Sword Stroke") was a rocket powered interceptor. It was the Japanese copy of the German Me 163 rocket powered interceptor fighter that was specially designed for use against high flying B-29 bombers. The prototype flew on 7 July 45. The War ended before production.

Hiryu To-Go[edit]

The Hiryu To-Go, also known as the Ki-167 "Sakura-dan", was a Mitsubishi Ki-67 Kai (Allied code name "Peggy") twin-engine bomber with guns removed and faired over, crew reduced to four men. This flying bomb was built with 3 ton thermite shaped-charge bomb behind the cockpit, pointed forward and angled slightly down, and a blast radius of 1 km. Two of these aircraft were known to have been built. One sorted 17 April 1945 and did not return.

Shinryu[edit]

The Mizuno Shinryu ("Divine Dragon") was a proposed rocket-powered kamikaze aircraft designed for the Imperial Japanese Navy towards the end of World War II. It never reached production.

Maru-Ten[edit]

The Maru-Ten was Nakajima's designation for the 'Kōkoku Nigō Heiki (皇国二号兵器 "Imperial Weapon No.2"?). This was a suicide weapon with no landing gear, was catapult launched using Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO), used Ne-12B engines, and carried a single bomb. It was never built, as it evolved into the Nakajima Kikka (中島 橘花 "Orange Blossom"?).

Baika[edit]

The Kawanishi Baika (梅花, "Ume Blossom") was a pulsejet-powered kamikaze aircraft under development for the Imperial Japanese Navy towards the end of World War II. The war ended before any were built. The design was greatly inspired by the manned version of the German V1 flying bomb, the Fieseler Fi 103R "Reichenberg".

Boats[edit]

A Shinyo suicide boat.

Shin'yō[edit]

The Shin'yō (Japanese: 震洋, "Sea Quake") were Japanese suicide boats developed during World War II.[8] They were part of the wider Special Attack Units program. These fast motorboats were driven by one man, to speeds of around 30 kn (56 km/h; 35 mph). They were typically equipped with 250 kg (551 lb) pounds of explosives packed in the bow with several impact fuses. The Shinyo units were known as Shimpu Tokubetsu-Kogekitai. About 6,200 Shinyo were produced for the Imperial Japanese Navy.

Maru-Ni[edit]

An additional 3,000 of the Shinyo were produced for the Imperial Japanese Army as Maru-Ni. The Maru-Ni units were known as Shimbu Tokubetsu-Kogekitai. About 400 of these boats were sent to Okinawa and Formosa, the rest were stored on the coast of Japan for the ultimate defense against the invasion of the Home islands. The Mary-Ni attacked by dropping one or two shallow-set depth charges as close to the target ship as possible, with the intention of turning away as the depth charges were released off the stern.

Midget Submarines[edit]

Ko-hyoteki[edit]

Type A Ko-hyoteki class submarine, No.19, grounded in the surf on Oahu after the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 1941

The Type A Ko-hyoteki (甲標的甲型 Kō-hyōteki kō-gata?, Target 'A', Type 'A') class was a class of Japanese midget submarines (Ko-hyoteki) was manufactured in three Types:

  • Type A Ko-hyoteki-class midget submarines were used in the 1942 Attack on Sydney Harbour, Attack on Diego Suarez Harbor and the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.[9]
  • Type B Midget Ha 45 prototype built 1942 to test Type A improvements.[10]
  • Type C Midget Ha 62–76 similar to Type A with crew of 3 and radius increased to 350 nautical miles (650 km) at 6 knots (11 km/h) surfaced or 120 nautical miles (220 km) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h) submerged.[10]
  • Type D Koryu (115 completed) improved Type C with crew of 5 and radius increased to 1000 miles at 8 knots surfaced and 320 miles at 16 knots submerged.[11][12]
Kaiten manned torpedoes, secured on the deck of a submarine.

Kaiten[edit]

The Kaiten (Japanese: 回天, literal translation: "Return to the sky", commonly rendered as: "The turn toward heaven", "The Heaven Shaker" or "Change the World"[13]) was a torpedo modified as a suicide weapon, and used by the Imperial Japanese Navy in the final stages of World War II.[8]

Early designs allowed for the pilot to escape after the final acceleration towards the target, although whether this could have been done successfully is doubtful. There is no record of any pilot attempting to escape or intending to do so, and this provision was dropped from later production kaitens. The inventor of the Kaiten, Lt. Hiroshi Kuroki was lost during one of the first training missions. When the sub was raised a note was found with a note written during his final minutes before death, sending his respects to his family and detailing the cause of the accident and how to repair the defect.

Kairyu[edit]

A Kairyu in the Aburatsubo inlet.

The Kairyu (海龍 Kairyū?, "Sea Dragon") was a Small, 2-man, midget submarine of the Imperial Japanese Navy of 20 ton that was based on the Type A midget submarine that was used in the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.[12] All five of the Type A midget submarines used were captured (1) or destroyed (4). Midgets also attacked in Sydney (all four lost) and Madagascar in June 1942. The Kairyu mini-submarines were meant to meet the invading American Naval forces upon their anticipated approach of Tokyo. Although not intended only as a suicide weapon, crew survival was possible, but the odds of survival were not high. These mini-submarines were built so that they could be equipped with either two torpedoes or a 1,000 pound warhead in the bow, for crashing into ships as the kaiten did. Over 760 of these submarines were planned, and by August 1945, 200 had been manufactured, most of them at the Yokosuka shipyard, but of the 200, only 115 were ready for use at the time of surrender.

Fukuryu[edit]

Fukuryu (Japanese:伏龍, Fukuryu "Crouching dragons") suicide divers were a part of the Special Attack Units prepared to resist the invasion of the Home islands by Allied forces.[14] They were equipped with a diving jacket and trousers, diving shoes, and a diving helmet fixed by four bolts. They were typically weighed down with 9 kg (20 lb) of lead, and had two bottles of compressed air at 150 bars. They were expected to be able to walk at a depth of 5 to 7 m (16 to 23 ft), for about six hours. The Fukuryu were armed with a 15 kg (33 lb) mine fired with a contact fuse, fitted onto the end of a 5 m (16 ft) bamboo pole. To attack, they would swim under a ship and slam the mine onto the ship's hull, destroying themselves in the process. This new weapon is only known to have been used a few times operationally:

  • January 8, 1945: Infantry landing craft (gunboat) LCI(G)-404 damaged by suicide divers in Yoo Passage, Palaus.
  • February 10, 1945: Attempted attack on surveying ship USS Hydrographer (AGS-2) by suicide divers in Schonian Harbor, Palaus.

Land-based Suicide Weapons[edit]

Nikaku[edit]

Although the Nikaku were not specifically designated as anti-ship weapons, the mental conditioning and training they received prepared them to pilot a Maru Ni, should the need arise. Nikaku were IJA soldiers with explosives strapped to their bodies, acting as human anti-tank mines. The method used in the attack was very simple: the soldier would crawl between the tank treads or allow the tank to drive over him, then explode the charge. The army pioneered this technique in the Philippines and on Okinawa. Other methods used were where the weapon was a shaped-charge on a spike or a simple hand grenade.

Giretsu Kūteitai[edit]

Giretsu (義烈空挺隊 Giretsu Kūteitai?) was an airlifted special forces unit of the Imperial Japanese Army formed from Army paratroopers, in November 1944 as a last-ditch attempt to reduce and delay Allied bombing raids on the Japanese home islands. These forces were airlifted and crash landed onto Allied Army or Marine air strips, with the intention of destroying as many aircraft as possible before being killed.

List of ships[edit]

This table list every known ship that was attacked and damaged by a Japanese special weapon. Not included are ships that were not damaged from a near miss, or were damaged when debris from another ship that was attacked and hit fell or flew on or into it.

Unless otherwise noted, these ships were hit by one kamikaze aircraft.

      Sunk by one or more kamikaze aircraft
      Hit or sunk by Ohka man-guided flying bomb
      Hit or sunk by Shinyo or Maru-Ni manned demolition boat
      Hit or sunk by Kaiten manned torpedo
      Hit or sunk by Fukuryu suicide swimmers

Ship Type Damaged or Sunk Date Location Source
USS Aaron Ward (DM-34)
ex DD-773
Destroyer minelayer Damaged[15] 3 May 1945 Okinawa radar picket station number 10 Cressman, p 672
DANFS
Rieley p 220-214
USS Abner Read (DD-526) Destroyer Sunk 1 November 1944 10°47'N 125°22'E Cressman, p 569
DANFS
USS Achernar (AKA-53)
ex SS Achernar
Attack cargo ship (Built as a type C2-S-B1 ship) Damaged 2 April 1945 26°07'N, 127°45'E, San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands Cressman, p 653
DANFS
USS Achilles (ARL-41)
ex USS LST-455
Repair ship, landing craft Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E Cressman, p 575
DANFS
Navsource.org
USS Adams (DM-27)
ex DD-739
Destroyer minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 27 March 1945 26°17'N, 127°40'E Cressman, p 649
DANFS
USS Adams (DM-27)
ex DD-739
Destroyer minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 31 March 1945 26°12'N, 127°08'E Cressman, p 652
DANFS
SS Alcoa Pioneer Type C1-B cargo ship Damaged 19 November 1944 San Pedro Bay, Leyte Cressman, p 581
Browning, p 456
SS Alexander Majors USAT "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 575
Browning, p 453
Bud's Liberty & Victory cargo ships
USS Allegan (AK-225)
ex SS Van Lear Vlack
Cargo ship (Built as a type EC2-S-C1 ship) Damaged 3 June 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 688
DANFS
USS Allen M. Sumner (DD-692) Destroyer Damaged 6 January 1945 16°40'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Alpine (APA-92)
ex SS Sea Arrow
Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°07'N, 125°02'E Cressman, p 579
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS Alpine (APA-92)
ex SS Sea Arrow
Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 17 November 1944 11°07'N, 125°02'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 579
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS Alpine (APA-92)
ex SS Sea Arrow
Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 1 April 1945 26°20'N, 127°41'E Cressman, p 652
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS Ammen (DD-527) Destroyer Damaged 1 November 1944 10°40'N, 125°20'E Cressman, p 569
DANFS
USS Anderson (DD-411) Destroyer Damaged 1 November 1944 10°11'N, 125°02'E Cressman, p 569
DANFS
USS Anthony (DD-515) Destroyer Damaged 27 May 1945 26°25'N, 128°30'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS Anthony (DD-515) Destroyer Damaged 7 June 1945 27°07'N, 127°38'E Cressman, p 691
DANFS
USS Apache (ATF-67) Fleet tug Damaged 5 January 1945 15°53'N, 120°00'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
HMAS Arunta Destroyer Damaged 5 January 1945 14°00'N, 120°00'E Cressman, p 604
Sea Power Centre - Australia
SS Augustus Thomas "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 24 October 1944 San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands Cressman, p 561
Browning, p 441
USS Aulick (DD-569) Destroyer Damaged 29 November 1944 10°35'N, 125°40'E Cressman, p 585
DANFS
HMAS Australia (D84) Heavy cruiser Damaged 5 January 1945 14°00'N, 120°00'E Cressman, p 604
Sea Power Centre - Australia
HMAS Australia (D84) Heavy cruiser Damaged 8 January 1945 16°22'N, 120°12'E Cressman, p 606
Sea Power Centre - Australia
HMAS Australia (D84) Heavy cruiser Damaged 9 January 1945 16°22'N, 120°12'E Cressman, p 607
Sea Power Centre - Australia
USS Bache (DD-470) Destroyer Damaged 3 May 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 672
DANFS
USS Bache (DD-470) Destroyer Damaged 13 May 1945 26°01'N, 126°53'E Cressman, p 678
DANFS
USS Barry (APD-29)
ex DD-248
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged[16] 25 May 1945 26°30'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Barry (APD-29)
ex DD-248
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged[17] 21 June 1945 off Okinawa DANFS
Naval Historical Center
Kimball (2007)
USS Barry (APD-29)
ex DD-248
Troop transport (high speed) Sunk[18] 22 June 1945 En route to Ie Shima Cressman, p 701-702
DANFS
USS Bates (APD-47)
ex DE-68
Troop transport (high speed) Sunk 25 May 1945 26°41'N, 127°47'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Belknap (APD-34)
ex DD-251 ex AVD-8
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 11 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E, off Luzon Cressman, p 608
DANFS
USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24) Aircraft carrier, light Damaged 30 October 1944 15°07'N, 124°01'E Cressman, p 568
DANFS
USS Benham (DD-796) Destroyer Damaged 17 April 1945 24°01'N, 132°32'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 664
DANFS
SS Benjamin Ide Wheeler "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 27 October 1944 Off Leyte Cressman, p 566
Browning, p 443
USS Bennion (DD-662) Destroyer Damaged 28 April 1945 27°26'N, 127°51'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Bennion (DD-662) Destroyer Damaged 30 April 1945 27°26'N, 127°51'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 671
DANFS
USS Bennett (DD-473) Destroyer Damaged 7 April 1945 27°16'N, 127°48'E Cressman, p 658
DANFS
USS Biloxi (CL-80) Light cruiser Damaged 26 March 1945 26°20'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
USS Birmingham (CL-62) Light cruiser Damaged[19] 4 May 1945 26°19'N, 127°43'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
USS Bismarck Sea (CVE-95) Aircraft carrier, escort Sunk 21 February 1945 24°36'N, 141°48'E, off Iwo Jima Cressman, p 627
DANFS
USS Borie (DD-704) Destroyer Damaged 9 August 1945 37°21'N, 143°45'E, off Honshu Cressman, p 730
DANFS
USS Bowers (DE-637) Destroyer escort Damaged 16 April 1945 26°52'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
SS Bozeman Victory "Victory" cargo ship Damaged[20][21] 28 April 1945 In Nago Bay Cressman, p 669
Browning, p 508
USS Braine (DD-630) Destroyer Damaged[22] 27 May 1945 26°25'N, 128°30'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS Bright (DE-747) Destroyer escort Damaged 13 May 1945 26°21'N, 127°17'E Cressman, p 678
DANFS
USS Brooks (APD-10)
ex DD-232
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 6 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Brown (DD-546) Destroyer Damaged 10 May 1945 26°26'N, 127°20'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
SS Brown Victory "Victory" cargo ship Damaged 28 May 1945 Off Ie Shima Cressman, p 685
Browning, p 514
USS Bryant (DD-665) Destroyer Damaged 22 December 1944 12°00'N, 121°00'E, off Mindoro Cressman, p 595
DANFS
USS Bryant (DD-665) Destroyer Damaged 16 April 1945 27°05'N, 128°13'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Bullard (DD-660) Destroyer Damaged 11 April 1945 26°00'N, 130°00'E Cressman, p 660
DANFS
USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) Aircraft carrier Damaged[23] 11 May 1945 25°44'N, 129°28'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
USS Bush (DD-529) Destroyer Sunk 6 April 1945 27°16'N, 127°48'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Butler (DMS-29)
ex DD-636
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 28 April 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Butler (DMS-29)
ex DD-636
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 25 May 1945 26°12'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Cabot (CVL-28) Aircraft carrier, light Damaged 25 November 1944 15°42'N, 123°09'E Cressman, p 584
DANFS
USS Caldwell (DD-605) Destroyer Damaged 12 December 1944 10°30'N, 124°42'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 592
DANFS
USS California (BB-44) Battleship Damaged 6 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Callaghan (DD-792) Destroyer Damaged 26 March 1945 26°20'N, 127°43'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
USS Callaghan (DD-792) Destroyer Sunk[24][25] 29 July 1945 25°43'N, 126°55'E Cressman, p 722
DANFS
USS Callaway (APA-35) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged[26] 7 January 1945 17°00'N, 120°00'E Cressman, p 607
DANFS
SS Canada Victory "Victory" cargo ship Sunk 27 April 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 669
Browning, pp 506–508
SS Cape Constance Type C1-B cargo ship Damaged[27] 3 November 1944 Tacloban, Leyte Cressman, p 571
Browning, p 544
SS Cape Romano Type C1-A cargo ship Damaged 19 November 1944 San Pedro Bay, Leyte Cressman, p 581
Browning, p 457
USS Carina (AK-74)
ex "Liberty" ship S.S. David Davis
"Liberty" cargo ship Damaged[20] 3 May 1945[28] 26°13'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 672
DANFS
Rielley (2010), pp 253, 323
USS Cassin Young (DD-793) Destroyer Damaged 12 April 1945 27°17'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Cassin Young (DD-793) Destroyer Damaged 29 July 1945 26°08'N, 127°58'E Cressman, p 723
DANFS
USS Champion (AM-134) Minesweeper Damaged 16 April 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
Rielly (2010,) p 233
USS Charles J. Badger (DD-657) Destroyer Damaged[20][29] 8 April 1945 26°18'N, 127°39'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 659
DANFS
USS Chase (APD-54)
ex DE-158
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 20 May 1945 26°18'N, 127°14'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
USS Chilton (APA-38) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged[30] 2 April 1945 25°59'N, 127°17'E Cressman, p 653
USS Claxton (DD-571) Destroyer Damaged 1 November 1944 10°40'N, 125°20'E Cressman, p 569
DANFS
USS Colhoun (DD-801) Destroyer Sunk[31] 6 April 1945 27°16'N, 127°48'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Colorado (BB-45) Battleship Damaged 27 November 1944 10°50'N, 125°25'E Cressman, p 585
DANFS
USS Columbia (CL-56) Light cruiser Damaged 6 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Columbia (CL-56) Light cruiser Damaged 9 January 1945 16°08'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 607
DANFS
USS Comfort (AH-6) Hospital ship Damaged 28 April 1945 25°30'N, 127°40'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Connolly (DE-306) Destroyer escort Damaged 13 April 1945 26°55'N, 126°46'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 662
Rielly (2010), p 235
USS Cowanesque (AO-79) Fleet oiler Damaged 3 January 1945 08°56'N, 122°49'E Cressman, p 603
DANFS
USS Cowell (DD-547) Destroyer Damaged 25 May 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
Rielly (2010), p 152
USS Curtiss (AV-4) Seaplane tender[32] Damaged 21 June 1945 26°10'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 701
USS Daly (DD-519) Destroyer Damaged 28 April 1945 27°12'N, 128°16'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Dashiell (DD-659) Destroyer Damaged 14 April 1945 27°15'N, 130°25'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 662
DANFS
SS David Dudley Field "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 24 October 1944 Tacloban, Leyte Cressman, p 561
Browning, p 442
SS David Dudley Field "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 January 1945 Subic Bay Cressman, p 609
Browning, p 481
USS Defense (AM-317) Minesweeper Damaged 6 April 1945 26°38'N, 127°31'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Denver (CL-58) Light cruiser Damaged 28 October 1944 10°57'N, 125°02'E Cressman, p 567
DANFS
USS Devastator (AM-318) Minesweeper Damaged 6 April 1945 26°26'N, 127°40'E Cressman, p 655
USS Devilfish (SS-292) Submarine Damaged[33] 20 March 1945 En route to patrol area DANFS
USS Dickerson (APD-21)
ex DD-157
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 2 April 1945 26°21'N, 127°45'E Cressman, p 653
DANFS
USS Dickerson (APD-21)
ex DD-157
Troop transport (high speed) Sunk[34] 4 April 1945 off Kerama Retto Cressman, p 654
DANFS
USS Dorsey (DMS-1)
ex DD-117
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 26 March 1945 26°20'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
USS Douglas H. Fox (DD-779) Destroyer Damaged 17 May 1945 25°59'N, 126°54'E Cressman, p 680
DANFS
USS Drayton (DD-366) Destroyer Damaged 5 December 1944 10°10'N, 125°20'E Cressman, p 588
DANFS
USS Drexler (DD-741) Destroyer Sunk 28 May 1945 27°06'N, 127°38'E Cressman, p 685
DANFS
USS DuPage (APA-41) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 10 January 1945 16°17'N, 120°15'E Cressman, p 608
DANFS
USS Dutton (AGS-8) Survey Ship Damaged 27 May 1945 26°15'N, 127°59'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS Earl V. Johnson (DE-702) Destroyer escort Damaged[35][36] 5 August 1945 20°17'N, 128°07 Cressman, p 727
DANFS
SS Edward N. Westcott "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 January 1945 Off the west coast of Luzon Cressman, p 609
Browning, p 480
USS Egeria (ARL-8) Repair Ship, Landing Craft Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E Cressman, p 575
Rielly (2010), p 131
USS Ellyson (DMS-19)
ex DD-545
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 22 June 1945 26°04'N, 127°55'E Cressman, p 702
Rielly (2010), p 294
SS Elmira Victory "Victory" cargo ship Damaged 12 January 1945 16°11'N, 120°20'E Cressman, p 609
Browning, p 489
USS Emmons (DMS-22)
ex DD-457
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged[37] 6 April 1945 26°48'N, 128°04'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Emmons (DMS-22)
ex DD-457
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Sunk[38] 7 April 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 658
DANFS
USS England (DE-635) Destroyer escort Damaged 27 April 1945 26°40'N, 127°40'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS England (DE-635) Destroyer escort Damaged 9 May 1945 26°18'N, 127°13'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
USS Enterprise (CV-6) Aircraft carrier Damaged[39] 11 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 660
DANFS
USS Enterprise (CV-6) Aircraft carrier Damaged 14 May 1945 30°23'N, 132°36'E, off Honshu Cressman, p 678
DANFS
USS Essex (CV-9) Aircraft carrier Damaged 25 November 1944 15°47'N, 124°14'E Cressman, p 584
DANFS
USS Evans (DD-552) Destroyer Damaged[40] 11 May 1945 26°58'N, 127°32'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
USS Facility (AM-233) Minesweeper Damaged 6 April 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Fieberling (DE-640) Destroyer escort Damaged 6 April 1945 26°48'N, 128°04'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Foote (DD-511) Destroyer Damaged 21 December 1944 11°05'N, 121°20'E, off Mindoro Cressman, p 595
Rielly (2010), pp 147, 151
USS Foreman (DE-633) Destroyer escort Damaged 26 March 1945 26°20'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
HMS Formidable (R67) Aircraft carrier Damaged 4 May 1945 26°01'N, 237°26'E' Cressman, p 673
naval-history.net
HMS Formidable (R67) Aircraft carrier Damaged 9 May 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 676
naval-history.net
USS Forrest (DMS-24)
ex DD-461
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 26 May 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 685
DANFS
SS Francisco Morazan "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged[41] 30 December 1944 Off Mindoro Cressman, p 598
Browning, p 472
USS Franklin (CV-13) Aircraft carrier Damaged[42] 13 October 1944 22°55'N, 123°12'E Cressman, p 554
DANFS
Rielly (2010), p 115
USS Gansevoort (DD-608) Destroyer Damaged 30 December 1944 12°21'N, 121°02'E Cressman, p 598
DANFS
USS Gayety (AM-239) Minesweeper Damaged[43][44] 4 May 1945 26°32'N, 126°58'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
MV General Fleischer Norwegian motor vessel Damaged 19 November 1944 San Pedro Bay, Leyte Cressman, p 581
Rielly, (2010) p 132
SS Gilbert Stuart USAT "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 18 November 1944 Off Tacloban Cressman, p 580
Browning, p 455
USS Gilligan (DE-508) Destroyer escort Damaged 12 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E, off the west coast of Luzon Cressman, p 609
DANFS
USS Gilligan (DE-508) Destroyer escort Damaged[35][45] 27 May 1945 26°47'N, 127°47'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS Gilmer (APD-11)
ex DD-233
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 25 March 1945 26°00'N, 127°20'E Cressman, p 647
DANFS
USS Gladiator (AM-319) Minesweeper Damaged[46] 12 April 1945 26°05'N, 127°35'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Gladiator (AM-319) Minesweeper Damaged[47] 22 April 1945 26°21'N, 127°45'E Cressman, p 667
DANFS
USS Goodhue (APA-107) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 2 April 1945 25°56'N, 127°17'E Cressman, p 653
DANFS
USS Gregory (DD-802) Destroyer Damaged 8 April 1945 27°07'N, 128°39'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 659
DANFS
USS Guest (DD-472) Destroyer Damaged[48] 25 May 1945 26°22'N, 127°44'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Gwin (DM-33)
ex DD-77
Destroyer minelayer Damaged 4 May 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 673
DANFS
USS Haggard (DD-555) Destroyer Damaged 29 April 1945 27°01'N, 129°40'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 670
DANFS
USS Halloran (DE-305) Destroyer escort Damaged 21 June 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 701
DANFS
USS Halsey Powell (DD-686) Destroyer Damaged 20 March 1945 30°27'N, 134°28'E Cressman, p 644
DANFS
USS Hambleton (DMS-20)
ex DD-455
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 3 April 1945 27°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 654
DANFS
USS Hancock (CV-19) Aircraft carrier Damaged 25 November 1944 15°47'N, 124°14'E Cressman, p 584
DANFS
USS Hancock (CV-19) Aircraft carrier Damaged 7 April 1945 27°00'N, 130°00'E Cressman, p 658
DANFS
USS Hank (DD-702) Destroyer Damaged[49] 11 April 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
USS Haraden (DD-585) Destroyer Damaged 13 December 1944 08°40'N, 122°33'E, Mindanao-Negros area Cressman, p 592
DANFS
USS Harding (DMS-28)
ex DD-625
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 16 April 1945 26°42'N, 127°25'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Harrison (DD-573) Destroyer Damaged 6 April 1945 27°05'N, 129°22'E Cressman, p 656
USS Harry F. Bauer (DM-26)
ex DD-738
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 29 April 1945 26°47'N, 128°42'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 670
DANFS
USS Harry F. Bauer (DM-26)
ex DD-738
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 10 May 1945 26°25'N, 128°31'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
USS Harry F. Bauer (DM-26)
ex DD-738
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 6 June 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 690
DANFS
USS Haynsworth (DD-700) Destroyer Damaged 6 April 1945 26°55'N, 129°29'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Hazelwood (DD-531) Destroyer Damaged 29 April 1945 27°02'N, 129°59'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 670
DANFS
USS Helm (DD-388) Destroyer Damaged[50] 5 January 1945 15°00'N, 119°00'E Cressman, p 604
Rielly (2010), p 158
USS Henrico (APA-45) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 2 April 1945 25°59'N, 127°17'E Cressman, p 653
DANFS
USS Hinsdale (APA-120) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 31 March 1945 25°54'N, 127°49'E Cressman, p 652
USS Hinsdale (APA-120) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 1 April 1945 26°20'N, 127°41'E Cressman, p 652
DANFS
Rielly (2010), p 206
SS Hobbs Victory "Victory" cargo ship Sunk[51] 6 April 1945 26°05'N, 125°14'E, northwest of Kerama Retto Cressman, p 657
Browning, p 500
USS Hobson (DMS-26)
ex DD-464
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 16 April 1945 27°26'N, 126°59'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Hodges (DE-231) Destroyer escort Damaged 9 January 1945 16°22'N, 120°12'E Cressman, p 607
DANFS
USS Hopkins (DD-249) Destroyer Damaged 4 May 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
Rielly (2010) p 260
USS Horace A. Bass (APD-124)
ex DE-691
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 29 July 1945 26°17'N, 127°34'E Cressman, p 723
DANFS
USS Howorth (DD-592) Destroyer Damaged 15 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°02'E Cressman, p 593
DANFS
USS Howorth (DD-592) Destroyer Damaged 6 April 1945 26°32'N, 127°40'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Hudson (DD-475) Destroyer Damaged[52] 22 April 1945 27°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Hugh W. Hadley (DD-774) Destroyer Damaged[43][53] 11 May 1945 26°59'N, 127°32'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
USS Hughes (DD-410) Destroyer Damaged 10 December 1944 10°15'N, 125°10'E Cressman, p 590
DANFS
USS Hunt (DD-674) Destroyer Damaged 14 April 1945 27°15'N, 130°25'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 663
DANFS
USS Hyman (DD-732) Destroyer Damaged[54] 6 April 1945 26°45'N, 27°42'E Cressman, p 656
DANFS
USS Idaho (BB-42) Battleship Damaged 12 April 1945 26°26'N, 127°32'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
HMS Indefatigable (R10) Aircraft carrier Damaged 1 April 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 653
[1]
USS Indianapolis (CA-35) Heavy cruiser Damaged 30 March 1945 26°25'N, 127°30'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 651
DANFS
HMS Indomitable (R92) Aircraft carrier Hit[55] 4 May 1945 26°01'N, 237°26'E Cressman, p 673
[2]
USS Ingraham (DD-694) Destroyer Damaged 5 May 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
DANFS
USS Intrepid (CV-11) Aircraft carrier Damaged 29 October 1944 15°07'N, 124°01'E Cressman, p 567
DANFS
USS Intrepid (CV-11) Aircraft carrier Damaged 25 November 1944 15°47'N, 124°14'E Cressman, p 584
DANFS
USS Intrepid (CV-11) Aircraft carrier Damaged 16 April 1945 27°37'N, 131°14'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Isherwood (DD-520) Destroyer Damaged 22 April 1945 26°14'N, 127°28'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS J. William Ditter (DM-31)
ex DD-751
Destroyer minelayer Damaged 6 June 1945 26°14'N,128°01'E Cressman, p 690
DANFS
USS James O'Hara (APA-90) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 23 November 1944 10°57'N, 125°02'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 583
Rielly (2010), p 132
USS Jeffers (DMS-27)
ex DD-621
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged[43][56] 12 April 1945 26°50'N, 126°35'E Cressman, p 661
Rielly (2010), p 232
SS Jeremiah M. Daily "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 575
Browning, p 451
SS John Burke "Liberty" cargo ship Sunk 28 December 1944 9°1'11"N 123°26'50"E, off Mindoro Cressman, p 598
Browning, p 470
USS John C. Butler (DE-339) Destroyer escort Damaged[57] 20 May 1945 26°47'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
SS John Evans "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 5 December 1944 09°34'N, 127°30'E, San Pedro Bay, Leyte Cressman, p 588
Browning, p 500
SS Josiah Snelling "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged[58] 28 May 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 685
Browning, p 515
SS Juan de Fuca "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 21 December 1944 Off Panay, ship continues on to Mindoro under own power (see 31 December) Cressman, p 595
Browning, p 467
USS Kadashan Bay (CVE-76) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 8 January 1945 15°10'N, 119°08'E Cressman, p 606
DANFS
USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) Aircraft Carrier, escort Damaged 25 October 1944 11°10'N, 126°20'E Cressman, p 563
DANFS
USS Kenneth Whiting (AV-14) Seaplane Tender Damaged 21 June 1945 26°10'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 701
DANFS
USS Keokuk (AKN-4)
ex SS Henry M. Flagler
Net cargo ship Damaged 21 February 1945 24°36'N, 141°48'E Cressman, p 627
DANFS
USS Kidd (DD-661) Destroyer Damaged 11 April 1945 26°00'N, 130°00'E Cressman, p 660
DANFS
USS Kimberley (DD-521) Destroyer Damaged 25 March 1945 26°02'N, 126°54'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 647
DANFS
USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) Aircraft Carrier, escort Damaged 25 October 1944 11°10'N, 126°20'E Cressman, p 563
DANFS
USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 8 January 1945 15°48'N, 119°09'E Cressman, p 606
DANFS
SS Kyle V. Johnson "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 January 1945 15°12'N, 119°30'E Cressman, p 609
Browning, p 481
USS Laffey (DD-724) Destroyer Damaged[59] 15 April 1945 27°16'N, 127°50'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 663
DANFS
USS La Grange (APA-124) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged[60] 13 August 1945 26°14'N, 127°52'E, Buckner Bay, Okinawa Cressman, p 733
DANFS
USS Lamson (DD-367) Destroyer Damaged 7 December 1944 10°28'N, 124°41'E Cressman, p 589
DANFS
USS LCI(G)-70 Landing craft, infantry (gunboat) Damaged 5 January 1945 15°36'N, 119°20'E Cressman, p 604
Turner, p 22
Rielly (2010) p 158
USS LCI-82 Landing craft infantry Sunk[20] 4 April 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 654
Naval Historical Center
USS LCI(L)-90 Landing craft, infantry, large Damaged 3 June 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 688
Naval Historical Center
USS LCI(G)-365 Landing craft, infantry (gun boat) Sunk[20] 10 January 1945 16°06'N, 120°14'E Cressman, p 607
Rielly (2010) p 164
USS LCI(G)-404 Landing craft Infantry (gunboat) Damaged[61] 8 January 1945 Yoo Passage, Palaus Cressman, p 606
Rielly (2010) p 161
USS LCI(G)-588 Landing craft, infantry (gun boat) Damaged[20] 28 March 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 648
Rielly (2010) p 203-204
USS LCI(M)-974 Landing craft, infantry (mortar) Sunk[20] 10 January 1945 16°06'N, 120°14'E Cressman, p 607
Naval Historical Center
USS LCS(L)(3)-7 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Sunk[20] 16 February 1945 At the entrance to Mariveles harbor Cressman, p 623
Ball, p 72
USS LCS(L)(3)-15 Landing craft, support (large) Sunk 22 April 1945 27°20'N, 127°10'E, off Okinawa Naval Historical Center
Rielly (2010) p 246
USS LCS(L)(3)-25 Landing craft, support Damaged 3 May 1945 26°24'N, 126°15'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 672
Rielly (2010) p 255
USS LCS(L)(3)-26 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Sunk[20] 16 February 1945 At the entrance to Mariveles harbor Ball, p 72
Rielly (2010) p 171
USS LCS(L)(3)-27 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Damaged[20] 16 February 1945 At the entrance to Mariveles harbor Ball, p 72
Rielly (2010) p 173
USS LCS(L)(3)-33 Landing craft, support (large) (Mk. III) Damaged 10 April 1945 Radar picket station #1, Okinawa Ball, p 170
USS LCS(L)(3)-33 Landing craft, support (large) (Mk. III) Sunk[62] 12 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 661
Rielly (2010) p 231
Naval Historical Center
USS LCS(L)(3)-36 Landing craft, support (large) Damaged 9 April 1945 Radar picket station #4, Okinawa Ball, p 170
Rielly (2010) p 226
USS LCS(L)(3)-37 Landing craft, support (large) Damaged 9 April 1945 Radar picket station #4, Okinawa Ball, p 190
Rielly (2010) p 246
USS LCS(L)(3)-37 Landing craft, support (large) Damaged 28 April 1945 Radar picket station #4, Okinawa Rielly (2010) p 249
USS LCS(L)(3)-49 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Sunk[20] 16 February 1945 At the entrance to Mariveles harbor Ball, p 72
Rielly (2010) p 171
USS LCS(L)(3)-51 Landing craft, support (large) Damaged 6 April 1945 Radar picket station #1, Okinawa Ball, p 180-181
Rielly (2010) p 231
USS LCS(L)(3)-52 Landing craft, support Damaged[63] 27 May 1945 Off Okinawa Ball, p 224
Rielly (2010) p 284
USS LCS(L)(3)-61 Landing craft, support (large) Damaged[64] 27 May 1945 Radar picket station #15A, Okinawa Ball, p 180-181
Rielly (2010) p 284
USS LCS(L)(3)-88 Landing craft, support Damaged 11 May 1945 26°58'N, 127°32'E Cressman, p 676
Ball, p 210-211
Rielly (2010) p 267
USS LCS(L)(3)-116 Landing craft, support Damaged 16 May 1945 Off Okinawa Ball, p 180
Rielly (2010) p 240
USS LCS(L)(3)-119 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Damaged 28 May 1945 26°15'N, 127°51'E Cressman, p 685
Ball, p 229-230
Rielly (2010) p 286
USS LCS(L)(3)-121 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Damaged 24 May 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 683
Ball p 222
USS LCS(L)(3)-122 Landing craft, support, large (Rocket) Damaged 11 June 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 694
Ball, p 234-235
Rielly (2010) pp 291–292
USS LCT-1075 Landing craft, tank Sunk[65] 10 December 1944 South of Dulag Cressman, p 590
Naval Historical Center
Rielly (2010) p 145
SS Leonidas Merritt "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 575
Browning, p 449
Rielly (2010) p 128
USS LeRay Wilson (DE-414) Destroyer escort Damaged 10 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 608
DANFS
Rielly (2010) p 163
USS Leutze (DD-481) Destroyer Damaged 6 April 1945 26°38'N, 127°28'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
Rielly (2010) p 212
SS Lewis L. Dyche "Liberty" cargo ship Sunk 4 January 1945 South of Mindoro Cressman, p 603
Browning, p 475
Rielly (2010) p 156
USS Lexington (CV-16) Aircraft carrier Damaged 5 November 1944 16°20'N, 123°59'E Cressman, p 571
DANFS
USS Liddle (APD-60)
ex DE-206
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 7 December 1944 10°57'N, 124°35'E Cressman, p 589
DANFS
USS Lindsey (DM-32)
ex DD-771
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 12 April 1945 26°28'N, 127°15'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Little (DD-803) Destroyer Sunk[66] 3 May 1945 26°24'N, 126°15'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 672
DANFS
SS Logan Victory "Victory" cargo ship Damaged[67] 6 April 1945 26°10'N, 127°16'E, off Kerama Retto Cressman, p 656
Browning, pp 499–500
USS Long (DMS-12)
ex DD-209
High-speed minesweeper Damaged 6 January 1945 16°12'N, 120°11'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Longshaw (DD-559) Destroyer Damaged 7 April 1945 26°29'N, 127°41'E Cressman, p 658
destroyersonline.com
USS Louisville (CA-28) Heavy cruiser Damaged 5 January 1945 15°53'N, 120°00'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Louisville (CA-28) Heavy cruiser Damaged 6 January 1945 16°37'N, 120°17'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Louisville (CA-28) Heavy cruiser Damaged 5 June 1945 26°07'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 690
DANFS
USS Loy (APD-56)
ex DE-160
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 27 May 1945 26°30'N, 127°30'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS LSM-18 Landing ship, medium Damaged 7 December 1944 10°57'N, 124°35'E Cressman, p 589
USS LSM-19 Landing ship, medium Damaged 7 December 1944 10°57'N, 124°35'E Cressman, p 589
USS LSM-20 Landing ship, medium Sunk 5 December 1944 10º12'N, 125º19'E Naval Historical Center
USS LSM-59 Landing ship, medium Sunk[68] 21 June 1945 En route to Ie Shima Cressman, p 701
Naval Historical Center
USS LSM-135 Landing ship, medium Sunk 25 May 1945 26°41'N, 127°47'E Cressman, p 683
Naval Historical Center
USS LSM-188 Landing ship medium Damaged 28 March 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 648
Naval Historical Center
USS LSM-189 Landing ship, medium (rocket) Damaged 12 April 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LSM-190 Landing ship, medium Sunk 4 May 1945 27°10'N, 127°58'E Cressman, p 673
Ball, 201-202
USS LSM-194 Landing ship, medium Sunk 4 May 1945 27°10'N, 127°58'E Cressman, p 673
Ball, p 203-204
USS LSM-194 Landing ship, medium Sunk 3 May 1945 26°24'N, 126°15'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 672
Ball, p 198
USS LSM-318 Landing ship, medium Sunk 7 December 1944 10°57'N, 124°35'E Cressman, p 589
Naval Historical Center
Rielly (2010) p 144
USS LST-447 Landing ship, tank Damaged 6 April 1945 26°09'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 656
DANFS
USS LST-447 Landing ship, tank Sunk[69] 7 April 1945 26°09'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 658
Warner p 328
DANFS
USS LST-460 Landing ship, tank Damaged 21 December 1944 11°13'N, 121°04'E Cressman, p 595
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-472 Landing ship, tank Damaged[70] 15 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°05'E, off southern tip of Mindoro Cressman, p 592-593
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-477 Landing ship, tank Damaged 21 February 1945 24°40'N, 141°44'E Cressman, p 627
USS LST-534 Landing ship, tank Damaged[71] 22 June 1945 26°18'N, 127°49'E Cressman, p 702
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-599 Landing ship, tank Damaged 3 April 1945 26°10'N, 127°16'E Cressman, p 654
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-610 Landing ship tank Damaged[20] 10 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 607
Rielly (2010) p 164
USS LST-700 Landing ship, tank Damaged[72] 12 January 1945 14°04'N, 119°25'E Cressman, p 609
Rielly (2010) p 164
USS LST-724 Landing ship, tank Damaged 31 March 1945 25°59'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 652
Rielly (2010) p 206
USS LST-737 Landing ship, tank Damaged 7 December 1944 10°57'N, 124°35'E Cressman, p 589
Rielly (2010) p 144
USS LST-738 Landing ship, tank Sunk[73] 15 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°05'E, off southern tip of Mindoro Cressman, p 592-593
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-749 Landing ship, tank Damaged 21 December 1944 11°13'N, 121°04'E Cressman, p 595
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-750 Landing ship, tank Sunk[74] 28 December 1944 09°01'N, 122°30'E Cressma p 598
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-808 Landing ship, tank Damaged 20 May 1945 26°42'N, 127°47'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
Naval Historical Center
USS LST-809 Landing ship, tank Damaged 21 February 1945 24°08'N, 142°06'E Cressman, p 627
Rielly (2010) pp 180–181
USS LST-884 Landing ship, tank Sunk[75] 31 March 1945 25°59'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 652
DANFS
Ball, p 157-158
USS LST-925 Landing ship tank Damaged[20] 9 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 607
Rielly (2010) pp 163–164
USS LST-1028 Landing ship tank Damaged[20] 9 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 607
USS Luce (DD-522) Destroyer Sunk 4 May 1945 26°35'N,127°10'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
USS Lunga Point (CVE-94) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 21 February 1945 24°40'N, 141°44'E Cressman, p 627
DANFS
Rielly (2010) p 179
USS Macomb (DMS-23)
ex DD-458
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 3 May 1945 26°01'N, 126°53'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 672
Rielly (2010) p 254
USS Maddox (DD-731) Destroyer Damaged 21 January 1945 23°06'N, 122°43'E Cressman, p 613
Rielly (2010) p 177
USS Mahan (DD-364) Destroyer Sunk[76] 7 December 1944 10°50'N, 124°30'E Cressman, p 589
Rielly (2010) p 140
USS Mahnomen County (LST-912) Landing ship, tank Damaged 8 January 1945 16°20'N 120°10'E, Surigao Straits Cressman, p 607
DANFS
Rielly (2010) p 162
USS Manila Bay (CVE-61) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 5 January 1945 14°50'N, 119°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Mannert L. Abele (DD-733) Destroyer Sunk[43][77] 12 April 1945 27°25'N, 126°59'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 661
DANFS
SS Marcus Daly "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 5 December 1944 09°34'N, 127°30'E, San Pedro Bay, Leyte Cressman, p 588
Browning, p 463
SS Marcus Daly "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 10 December 1944 South of Dulag Cressman, p 590
Browning, pp 465–466
USS Marcus Island (CVE-77) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 15 December 1944 off Mindoro Cressman, p 593
DANFS
SS Mary A. Livermore "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 28 May 1945 26°12'N, 127°46'E, Buckner Bay Cressman, p 685
Browning, p 514
USS Maryland (BB-46) Battleship Damaged 29 November 1944 10°41'N, 125°23'E, In Leyte Gulf Cressman, p 585
DANFS
USS Maryland (BB-46) Battleship Damaged 7 April 1945 26°40'N, 127°29'E Cressman, p 658
DANFS
SS Matthew P. Deady USAT "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 3 November 1944 Tacloban, Leyte Cressman, p 571
Browning, p 447
SS Minot Victory "Victory" cargo ship Damaged 12 April 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, pp 661–662
Browning, p 503
USS Mississinewa (AO-59) Fleet oiler Sunk[35][78] 20 November 1944 10°06'N, 139°43'E, Ulithi Cressman, p 581
DANFS
USS Mississippi (BB-41) Battleship Damaged 9 January 1945 16°08'N, 120°18'E Cressman, p 607
DANFS
USS Mississippi (BB-41) Battleship Damaged 5 June 1945 26°09'N, 127°35'E Cressman, p 690
DANFS
USS Missouri (BB-63) Battleship Damaged 11 April 1945 26°00'N, 130°00'E Cressman, p 660
DANFS
USS Missouri (BB-63) Battleship Damaged 16 April 1945 26°00'N, 130°00'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Montpelier (CL-57) Light cruiser Damaged 27 November 1944 10°50'N, 125°25'E Cressman, p 585
Rielly (2010) p 136
USS Morris (DD-417) Destroyer Damaged 6 April 1945 25°55'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Morrison (DD-560) Destroyer Sunk 4 May 1945 27°10'N, 127°58'E Cressman, p 673
DANFS
SS Morrison R. Waite "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 575
Browning, p 452
USS Mugford (DD-389) Destroyer Damaged 5 December 1944 10°15'N, 125°20'E Cressman, p 588
DANFS
USS Mullany (DD-528) Destroyer Damaged[79] 6 April 1945 26°24'N, 128°10'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Nashville (CL-43) Light cruiser Damaged 13 December 1944 08°57'N, 123°28'E Cressman, p 592
DANFS
USS Natoma Bay (CVE-62) Aircraft Carrier, escort Damaged 7 June 1945 24°46'N, 126°37'E Cressman, p 691
DANFS
USS Nevada (BB-36) Battleship Damaged 26 March 1945 26°20'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
USS New Mexico (BB-40) Battleship Damaged 6 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS New Mexico (BB-40) Battleship Damaged 12 May 1945 26°22'N, 127°43'E Cressman, p 677
DANFS
USS New York (BB-34) Battleship Damaged 14 April 1945 Off Okinawa, 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 662
DANFS
USS Newcomb (DD-586) Destroyer Damaged 6 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
SS Newcomb (DD-586) Destroyer Damaged[80] 6 April 1945 26°38'N, 127°28'E Cressman, p 655
DANSF
USS O'Brien (DD-725) Destroyer Damaged 6 January 1945 16°23'N, 120°14'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS O'Brien (DD-725) Destroyer Damaged 26 March 1945 26°16'N, 127°26'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
USS O'Neill (DE-188) Destroyer escort Damaged 25 May 1945 26°20'N, 127°43'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Oberrender (DE-344) Destroyer escort Damaged 9 May 1945 26°32'N, 127°30'E Cressman, p 676
DANFS
USS Ommaney Bay (CVE-79) Aircraft carrier, escort Sunk[81] 4 January 1945 11°25'N, 121°19'E Cressman, p 603
DANFS
USS Orca (AVP-49) Small Seaplane Tender) Damaged 5 January 1945 15°36'N, 119°20'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Orestes (AGP-10) Patrol Craft Tender Damaged 30 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°04'E Cressman, p 598
DANFS
SS Otis Skinner "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 January 1945 14°42'N, 119°35'E Cressman, p 609
Browning, pp 479–480
USS Pathfinder (AGS-1) Survey Ship Damaged 5 May 1945 26°38'N, 127°53'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 676
NOAA
USS Paul Hamilton (DD-590) Destroyer Damaged 15 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°02'E Cressman, p 593
USS PC-1129 Coastal Patrol Craft Damaged[20] 31 January 1945 14°05'N, 120°30'E Cressman, p 617
Navsource
USS PC-1603 Coastal Patrol Craft Damaged[82] 26 May 1945 26°25'N, 127°53'E Cressman, p 684
Navsource
USS PCS-1396 Coastal Patrol Craft Damaged 27 May 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 684
Navsource
USS Pinkney (APH-2) Evacuation transport Damaged 28 April 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Porcupine (IX-126)
ex SS Leif Ericson a Liberty Ship Tanker
Auxiliary tanker Sunk[83] 30 December 1944 12°21'N, 121°02'E Cressman, p 598
Deck log, USS Bush (DD-529)
USS Porterfield (DD-682) Destroyer Damaged 26 March 1945 26°20'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 648
USS Prichett (DD-561) Destroyer Damaged[84] 28 July 1945 25°43'N, 126°56'E Cressman, p 722
DANFS
USS Pringle (DD-477) Destroyer Damaged 30 December 1944 12°18'N, 121°01'E Cressman, p 598
DANFS
USS Pringle (DD-477) Destroyer Sunk 16 April 1945 27°26'N, 126°59'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS PT-84 Patrol torpedo boat Damaged 17 December 1944 off Mindoro, 12°19'N, 121°04'E Cressman, p 593
Hyperwar
USS PT-223 Patrol torpedo boat Damaged 15 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°05'E Cressman, p 593
Hyperwar
USS PT-300 Patrol torpedo boat Sunk 18 December 1944 12°19'N, 121°05'E, off Mindoro Cressman, p 593
DANFS
Hyperwar
USS PT-323 Patrol torpedo boat Sunk 10 December 1944 10°33'N, 125°14'E Cressman, p 590
DANFS
Hyperwar
USS Purdy (DD-734) Destroyer Damaged 12 April 1945 27°16'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Rall (DE-304) Destroyer escort Damaged 12 April 1945 26°36'N, 127°39'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) Destroyer Damaged 27 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Randolph (CV-15) Aircraft carrier Damaged 11 March 1945 Ulithi www.Combined fleet.com
DANFS
USS Ransom (AM-283) Minesweeper Damaged 6 April 1945 26°48'N, 128°04'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Ransom (AM-283) Minesweeper Damaged 22 April 1945 26°14'N, 127°28'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Rathburne (APD-25)
ex DD-113
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 27 April 1945 26°26'N, 127°36'E Cressman, p 669
http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/r3/rathburne-i.htm DANFS[]
USS Rednour (APD-102)
ex DE-592
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 27 May 1945 26°29'N, 127°21'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS Register (APD-92)
ex DE-233
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 20 May 1945 26°25'N, 127°21'E Cressman, p 681
DANFS
USS Reid (DD-369) Destroyer Sunk 11 December 1944 off Leyte, 09°50'N, 124°55'E Cressman, p 591
DANFS
USS Reno (CL-96) Light cruiser Damaged 14 October 1944 22°48'N, 123°01'E Cressman, p 554
DANFS
USS Richard P. Leary (DD-664) Destroyer Damaged[85] 6 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Richard W. Suesens (DE-342) Destroyer escort Damaged 12 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E, off the west coast of Luzon Cressman, p 609
DANFS
USS Riddle (DE-185) Destroyer escort Damaged 12 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Robert H. Smith (DM-23)
ex DD-735
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 25 March 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 647
DANFS
USS Robinson (DD-562) Destroyer Damaged[20] 10 January 1945 16°06'N, 120°14'E Cressman, p 607
[]
USS Rodman (DMS-21)
ex DD-453
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 6 April 1945 26°48'N, 128°04'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Roper APD-20 ex DD-147 Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 25 May 1945 26°34'N, 127°36'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
SS S. Hall Young USAT "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 29 April 1945 In Nago Bay Cressman, p 671
Browning, p 509
USS Salamaua (CVE-96) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 13 January 1945 17°09'N, 119°21'E Cressman, p 610
DANFS
USS Samuel S. Miles (DE-183) Destroyer escort Damaged 11 April 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) Aircraft carrier, light Damaged 6 April 1945 26°46'N, 129°43'E Cressman, p 656
DANFS
USS Sandoval (APA-194) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged 28 May 1945 26°15'N, 127°51'E Cressman, p 685
DANFS
USS Sangamon (CVE-26) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 4 May 1945 26°01'N, 237°26'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Santee (CVE-29) Aircraft Carrier, escort Damaged 25 October 1944 09°45'N, 126°20'E Cressman, p 563
DANFS
USS Saratoga (CV-3) Aircraft carrier Damaged[86] 21 February 1945 24°56'N, 142°01'E Cressman, p 627
DANFS
USS Saufley (DD-465) Destroyer Damaged 29 November 1944 10°50'N, 125°25'E Cressman, p 585
DANFS
USS Savo Island (CVE-78) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 5 January 1945 14°50'N, 119°00'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS SC-744 Submarine chaser Sunk 27 November 1944 10°44'N, 125°07'E, Leyte Gulf Cressman, p 585
[]
USS Sederstrom (DE-31) Destroyer escort Damaged 22 March 1945 Off Okinawa DANFS
DANFS
USS Shannon (DM-25)
ex DD-737
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 29 April 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 670
[]
USS Shea (DM-30)
ex DD-750
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged 22 April 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Shea (DM-30)
ex DD-750
Light minelayer (converted destroyer) Damaged[43] 4 May 1945 27°26'N, 126°59'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Shubrick (DD-639) Destroyer Damaged 29 May 1945 26°38'N, 127°05'E Cressman, p 686
DANFS
USS Sigsbee (DD-502) Destroyer Damaged 14 April 1945 Off Okinawa, 27°15'N, 130°25'E Cressman, p 662
DANFS
USS Sims (APD-50)
ex DE-154
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 18 May 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 680
DANFS
USS Sims (APD-50)
ex DE-154
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 24 May 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Skirmish (AM-303) Minesweeper Damaged[87] 26 March 1945 26°25'N, 127°05'E Cressman, p 648
DANFS
USS Smith (DD-378) Destroyer Damaged 26 October 1944 northwest of the New Hebrides Islands DANFS
USS Sonoma (AT-12)
ex ATO-12
Fleet tug, old Damaged 24 October 1944 San Pedro Bay, Leyte Cressman, p 561,
DANFS,
Navsource.org
USS Southard (DMS-10)
ex (DD-207)
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 6 January 1945 16°11'N, 126°16'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Southard (DMS-10)
ex DD-207
High speed minesweeper (converted destroyer) Damaged 27 May 1945 26°00'N, 127°00'E Cressman, p 684
DANFS
USS Spectacle (AM-305) Minesweeper Damaged 25 May 1945 26°40'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS St. George (AV-16) Seaplane Tender) Damaged 5 May 1945 26°10'N, 127°19'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 674
DANFS
USS St. Lo (CVE-63) Aircraft carrier, escort Sunk[88] 25 October 1944 11°13'N, 126°05'E Cressman, p 563
Naval Historical Center
Wikimapia
USS St. Louis (CL-49) Light cruiser Damaged 27 November 1944 10°50'N, 125°25'E Cressman, p 585
DANFS
USS Stanly (DD-478) Destroyer Damaged[43][89] 12 April 1945 27°12'N, 128°17'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Starr (AKA-67)
ex SS Star
Attack cargo ship (Built as a Type C2-S-AJ3 ship) Damaged[20][90] 9 April 1945 26°20'N, 127°44'E Cressman, p 659
DANFS
USS Stafford (DE-411) Destroyer escort Damaged 5 January 1945 14°00'N, 120°00'E Cressman, p 604
DANFS
USS Sterett (DD-407) Destroyer Damaged 9 April 1945 26°47'N, 128°42'E, picket station #4 off Okinawa Cressman, p 659
DANFS
USS Stormes (DD-780) Destroyer Damaged 25 May 1945 27°06'N, 127°38'E Cressman, p 683
DANFS
USS Suwannee (CVE-27) Aircraft Carrier, escort Damaged 25 October 1944 09°45'N, 126°42'E Cressman, p 563
DANFS
USS Swallow (AM-65) Minesweeper Sunk 22 April 1945 26°10'N, 127°12'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Taluga (AO-62) Fleet oiler Damaged 16 April 1945 26°03'N, 127°26'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Tatum (APD-81)
ex DE-789
Troop transport (high speed) Damaged 29 May 1945 26°40'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 686
DANFS
USS Telfair (APA-210) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged[91] 2 April 1945 25°56'N, 127°17'E Cressman, p 653
DANFS
USS Tennessee (BB-43) Battleship Damaged 12 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
USS Terror (CM-5) minelayer Damaged 29 April 1945 26°10'N, 127°18'E Cressman, p 671
DANFS
USS Thatcher (DD-514) Destroyer Damaged 20 May 1945 26°33'N, 127°29'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 681
DANFS
USS Thatcher (DD-514) Destroyer Damaged 19 July 1945 26°15'N, 127°50'E Cressman, p 717
DANFS
SS Thomas Nelson USAT "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 575
Browning, p 450
USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) Aircraft carrier Damaged[92] 21 January 1945 22°40'N, 122°57'E Cressman, p 613
DANFS
USS Twiggs (DD-591) Destroyer Damaged 25 March 1945 27°12'N, 128°16'E Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Twiggs (DD-591) Destroyer Sunk[93] 16 June 1945 off Senaga Shima Cressman, p 695
DANFS
USS Tyrrell (AKA-80)
ex SS Tyrrel
Attack cargo ship
Built as a type C2-S-AJ3 ship
Damaged[94] 2 April 1945 26°21'N, 127°45'E Cressman, p 653
DANFS
USS Underhill (DE-682) Destroyer escort Sunk[35][95] 24 July 1945 off Luzon, 19°20'N, 126°42'E Cressman, p 719
DANFS
USS Vammen (DE-644) Destroyer escort Damaged[20][96] 1 April 1945 26°18'N, 127°29'E Cressman, p 652
DANFS
HMS Victorious (R38) Aircraft carrier Damaged[97] 4 May 1945 Off Okinawa NAVAL-HISTORY.NET
HMS Victorious (R38) Aircraft carrier Damaged[98] 9 May 1945 Off Okinawa Cressman, p 676
NAVAL-HISTORY.NET
USS Wadsworth (DD-516) Destroyer Damaged 22 April 1945 26°10'N, 126°24'E Cressman, p 664
DANFS
USS Wadsworth (DD-516) Destroyer Damaged 28 April 1945 26°47'N, 126°38'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 669
DANFS
USS Wake Island (CVE-65) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 3 April 1945 26°05'N, 128°57'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 654
DANFS
USS Walke (DD-723) Destroyer Damaged[99] 6 January 1945 16°40'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 605
DANFS
USS Walter C. Wann (DE-412) Destroyer escort Damaged 12 April 1945 26°17'N, 127°20'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
SS Walter Colton "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged[100] 11 June 1945 off Okinawa Cressman, p 694
Browning, p 517
USS War Hawk (AP-168) Personnel Transport Ship Damaged[20] 9 January 1945 16°20'N, 120°10'E Cressman, p 607
DANFS
USS War Hawk (AP-168) Personnel Transport Ship Damaged[20] 10 January 1945 16°06'N, 120°14'E Cressman, p 607
DANFS
USS Ward (APD-16)
ex DD-139
Troop transport (high speed) Sunk[101][102] 7 December 1944 10°51'N, 124°33'E Cressman, p 589
DANFS
USS Wesson (DE-184) Destroyer escort Damaged 7 April 1945 26°48'N, 127°55'E Cressman, p 658
DANFS
USS West Virginia (BB-48) Battleship Damaged 1 April 1945 26°20'N, 127°40'E Cressman, p 652
DANFS
USS White Plains (CVE-66) Aircraft carrier, escort Damaged 25 October 1944 off Samar DANFS
DANFS
USS Whitehurst (DE-634) Destroyer escort Damaged 12 April 1945 26°04'N, 127°12'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS
SS William A. Coulter "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged 12 November 1944 11°11'N, 125°05'E, off Leyte Cressman, p 575
Browning, p 451
USS William C. Cole (DE-641) Destroyer escort Damaged 24 May 1945 26°45'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 682-683
DANFS
USS William D. Porter (DD-579) Destroyer Sunk 10 June 1945 27°06'N, 127°38'E Cressman, p 693
DANFS
SS William S. Ladd "Liberty" cargo ship Sunk 10 December 1944 South of Dulag Cressman, p 590
Browning, pp 465–466
SS William Sharon "Liberty" cargo ship Damaged[103] 28 December 1944 Off Mindoro Cressman, p 598
Browning, pp 469–70
USS Wilson (DD-408) Destroyer Damaged 4 April 1945 Off southern end of Kerama Retto Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS Wilson (DD-408) Destroyer Damaged 15 April 1945 26°03'N, 127°20'E, off Okinawa Cressman, p 663
DANFS
USS Witter (DE-636) Destroyer escort Damaged 6 April 1945 26°04'N, 127°52'E Cressman, p 655
DANFS
USS YDG-10 Degaussing vessel Damaged 27 May 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 684
[]
USS YMS-81 Motor Minesweeper Damaged 7 April 1945 26°35'N, 127°53'E Cressman, p 658
[]
USS YMS-311 Motor minesweeper Damaged 6 April 1945 26°38'N, 127°48'E Cressman, p 655
[]
USS YMS-321 Motor minesweeper Damaged 6 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 655
[]
USS YMS-327 Motor minesweeper Damaged[104] 4 May 1945 26°32'N, 126°58'E Cressman, p 673
[]
USS YMS-331 Motor minesweeper Damaged[20] 15 April 1945 26°15'N, 127°36'E Cressman, p 663
[]
USS Zeilin (APA-3) Attack personnel transport ship Damaged[105] 12 January 1945 15°23'N, 119°25'E Cressman, p 609
DANFS
USS Zellars (DD-777) Destroyer Damaged 12 April 1945 26°00'N, 128°00'E Cressman, p 661
DANFS

Bibliography[edit]

  • LCI: Landing Craft Infantry, Volume II. Turner Publishing. 1995. ISBN 1563112620. 
  • Ball, Donald L. (1997). Fighting Amphibs; The LCS(L) in World War II. Williamsburgh, VA: Mill Neck Publications. ISBN 0965905500. 
  • Browning Jr., Robert M. (1996). US Merchant Vessel War Casualties of World War II. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1557500878. 
  • Cressman, Robert J. (1999). The Official Chronology of the U.S. Navy in World War II. Naval Historical Center: Contemporary History Branch. 
  • Masterson, Dr. James R. (October 1949). U. S. Army Transportation, In The Southwest Pacific Area. US Army: Transportation Unit Historical Division Special Staff. 
  • Rielly, Robin L. (2008). Kamikazes, Corsairs, and Picket Ships. Havertown, PA: Casemare. ISBN 978-1935149415. 
  • Rielly, Robin L. (2010). Kamikaze Attacks of World War II. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland ∓ Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0786446544. 
  • Watts, Anthony J. (1967). Japanese Warships of World War II. Doubleday & Company. 
  • Zaloga, Steven J. (2010). Defense of Japan. Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 9781846036873. 
  • Ships' Data US Naval Vessels Vol I 250-010. Navships. April 15, 1945. 
  • Ships' Data US Naval Vessels Vol II 250-011. Navships. April 15, 1945. 
  • Ships' Data US Naval Vessels Vol III 250-012. Navships. April 15, 1945. 
  • Casualties: U.S. Navy and Coast Guard Vessels, Sunk or Damaged Beyond Repair during World War II 7 December 1941-1 October 1945. Department Of The Navy: Naval History And Heritage Command. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ USS Aaron Ward (DM-34) was struck by six kamikaze aircraft 3 May 1945
  2. ^ Zaloga
  3. ^ a b c d Zaloga, p 37
  4. ^ Zaloga p 38
  5. ^ Zaloga p 39
  6. ^ Zaloga p 40
  7. ^ Century of flight
  8. ^ a b Zaloga, p 40
  9. ^ Hearst Magazines (May 1942). "Jap Sub Had Guard to Cut Net in Harbor". Popular Mechanics. Hearst Magazines. pp. 71–. ISSN 00324558. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  10. ^ a b Watts, Anthony J. Japanese Warships of World War II Doubleday & Company (1967), p 213
  11. ^ Watts, Anthony J. Japanese Warships of World War II Doubleday & Company (1967), p 216
  12. ^ a b Zalogo, p 43
  13. ^ Hashimoto, Mochitsura (1954). Sunk: The Story of the Japanese Submarine Fleet, 1914–1945. Translated by Commander E.H.M. Colegrave. New York: Henry Holt and Company. 
  14. ^ Zalogo pp 42-45
  15. ^ USS Aaron Ward was hit by 6 kamikazes
  16. ^ USS Barry, see Barry 21 June and Barry 22 June
  17. ^ The Naval Historical Center listing states that USS Barry (APD-29) was "damaged by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 25 May 1945, and sunk as a decoy, 21 June 1945." This description does not make clear how Barry sank on June 21, 1945. The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships describes the sinking as follows:
    Barry was towed to the anchorage at Kerama Retto 28 May and found too extensively damaged to warrant repair or salvage. Stripped of useful gear, she was decommissioned 21 June 1945. Later in the day she was towed from the harbor of Kerama Retto to be used as a decoy for the kamikazes. While under tow she was attacked by Japanese suicide planes and sunk along with her escort, LSM-59.
    There is another account of the sinking: Kimball (2007), a crew member of fleet tug USS Lipan (ATF-85), tells the story of the sinking of Barry by a kamikaze plane:
    The USS Barry was an old four-stacker Destroyer commissioned around 1920 and modernized and converted into a high-speed troop transport and reclassified as an APD. It took some hits and was intentionally run up on the beach to avoid sinking in deep water and it spent sometime just sitting there. The High Command was experimenting with methods of defending against the relentless kamikaze attacks by the Japanese pilots and it was decided to use the Barry as a decoy to attract the suicide pilots. Since Barry was stripped of all usable equipment its hulk was expendable. Lipan's divers put a soft patch on the hull of the Barry and its interior was filled with empty sealed 5" ammo containers. It was hoped the sealed containers would act as flotation gear and make the Barry less vulnerable to sinking from direct hits. The Barry was fitted with remote controlled flashing lights that looked like anti-aircraft gun muzzle flashes from the air. It also had smudge pots placed at strategic locations and remotely controlled to simulate stack smoke and damage from attacks. From the air it looked like a fully operational Destroyer and it was intended to draw the kamikaze pilots to it and away from the nearby manned vessels. The LSM contained the remote controls for the Barry's pseudo weapons and Lipan was to tow the Barry to simulate an underway tin can. It didn't take long before two kamikaze planes appeared just ten feet off the water equipped with huge bombs strapped to their belly to create a gigantic explosion when they slammed into a vessel. To our dismay, the first attacking Japanese plane slammed into the small USS LSM-59 and hit it directly amidships. The resultant explosion blew the ship into the hereafter and there was not one recognizable part left floating and at least sixty sailors met their demise. We hadn't anytime to think as the second kamikaze climbed straight up to make a dive on us and the Barry. I was a gunner on the 40mm and we gave him all we had, shooting off his wings and setting him afire. Nevertheless, he was able to slam into the Barry and hit her right on the bridge. We could not save her so we tried to tow her to Ie Shima. In the middle of the night the Barry started to sink and was pulling our old "Green Dragon" down by the stern. We had a pelican hook rigged and a sailor hit the release and the Barry slipped from our grasp and headed for Davy Jones' Locker.
  18. ^ USS Barry sank as the result of damage received the previous day (see Barry 24 May 1945 and Barry 21 June 1945)
  19. ^ USS Birminham was damaged by a kamikaze's bomb, a torpedo, and a second kamikaze that struck her amidships
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Damaged or sunk by a Shinyo or Maru-Ni manned demolition boat
  21. ^ SS Bozeman Victory was the first ship damaged or sunk by a manned demolition boat
  22. ^ USS Braine was hit by two kamikazes
  23. ^ USS Bunker Hill was hit by two kamikazes
  24. ^ USS Callaghan was sunk by kamikaze while on radar picket station approximately 50 miles southwest of Okinawa. She was the last Allied vessel lost to that weapon.
  25. ^ The Naval Historical Center listing gives July 28, 1945, as the date USS Callaghan sunk, which was reported occurring at 0235. Cressman has 29 July 1945 as the date
  26. ^ USS Callaway is listed at The Naval Historical Center with 8 January 1945 as the date for the attack while Cressman has 7 January as the date
  27. ^ SS Cape Constance is listed as damaged 3 November in Cressman, 4 November at The Naval Historical Center
  28. ^ USS Carina is listed in Cressman with date of 3 May and on 4 May at The Naval Historical Center
  29. ^ USS Charles J. Badger was damaged by an IJA Maru-Ni attack
  30. ^ USS Chilton was damaged by a kamikaze near-miss
  31. ^ USS Colhoun was irreparably damaged by four kamikazes, and was scuttled by destroyer USS Cassin Young (DD-793)
  32. ^ USS Curtiss was fired on by a midget submarine at Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941. Curtiss rammed the submarine. Curtiss shot down 3 aircraft the same day
  33. ^ USS Devilfish was attacked by a kamikaze 20 March 1945 before she entered her patrol area. The plane struck her as she was submerging, destroying the mast structure, causing serious leaks.
  34. ^ USS Dickerson was irreparably damaged 2 April 1945. She was towed out to sea and scuttled off Kerama Retto by salvage crew
  35. ^ a b c d Damaged or sunk by a kaiten manned torpedo
  36. ^ USS Earl V. Johnson was damaged by the explosion from a near-miss of a kaiten manned-torpedo that was launched from submarine I 53, Philippine Sea
  37. ^ USS Emmons was struck by five kamikazes
  38. ^ USS Emmons was irreparably damaged by five kamikazes the previous day, is scuttled by high speed minesweeper USS Ellyson (DMS-19)
  39. ^ USS Enterprise was damaged from the 3 direct hits and 4 near misses kamikazes
  40. ^ USS Evans was struck by four kamikazes
  41. ^ SS Francisco Morozan was damaged when a kamikaze that was shot down by a US fighter exploded over the ship
  42. ^ USS Franklin was the first ship hit by a Japanese aircraft. It was reported that "The Betty, hit numerous times by anti-aircraft fire, went out of control. The bomber’s shallow dive caused it to strike a glancing blow on the flight deck abaft the carrier’s island, and it went over the side of the ship without causing any significant damage." The report continued "Damage to Franklin was minimal, but she suffered one dead and ten wounded."
  43. ^ a b c d e f Damaged or sunk by Ohka manned flying bomb
  44. ^ USS Gayety was damaged by two kamikaze near-misses and was the first ship hit by an Ohka
  45. ^ USS Gilligan was hit and damaged by a dud kaiten manned-torpedo launched from Japanese submarine I 367
  46. ^ USS Gladiator was damaged by a near-miss of kamikaze
  47. ^ USS Gladiator was damaged by strafing and the near-miss of a kamikaze
  48. ^ USS Guest was struck on the mast by a kamikaze that subsequently crashed just over the side, Guest suffered little or no damage
  49. ^ USS Hank, reported that, while under attack, a kamikaze came in low off the port bow, heading directly for the bridge, Hank's accurate antiaircraft fire deflected it slightly, but the "Zeke" came in close enough to kill three sailors before crashing into the sea and exploding close aboard.
  50. ^ USS Helm had a close call when a kamikaze took off her mast and searchlight, finally crashing alongside the ship.
  51. ^ SS Hobbs Victory's uncontrollable fires lead to her abandonment. SS Hobbs Victory exploded and sank the following morning
  52. ^ USS Hudson reported that a kamakaze crashed close aboard 22 April 1945, clipping a chief on the head with a wingtip but missing the ship.
  53. ^ USS Hugh W. Hadley was struck by one bomb, an Ohka, and two kamikazes
  54. ^ USS Hyman was hit by both a kamikaze and a torpedo
  55. ^ HMS Indomitable was hit by a kamikaze, but her armored deck deflected the attacker into the sea with no damage to Indomitable
  56. ^ USS Jeffers was hit by both a Ohka and a kamikaze
  57. ^ USS John C. Butler received minor damage when a kamikaze struck her mast and antennas
  58. ^ SS Josiah Snelling's Armed Guard gunfire deflected the Japanese plane from its deckhouse target to a less vulnerable part, saving the ship from worse damage.
  59. ^ USS Laffey was badly damaged by four bombs and five kamakaze hits
  60. ^ USS Lagrange was the last US Navy ship hit by a kamikaze
  61. ^ USS LCI(G)-404 was the first and only US Navy ship sunk or damaged by Fukuryu suicide swimmers
  62. ^ The Naval Historical Center listing states that LCS(L)(3)-33 was "sunk by shore batteries off Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945". However, the LCS(L)(3)-33 Action Report dated 4 April 1945 describes the ship's firing at attacking Japanese planes, so the ship obviously did not sink off Iwo Jima. Rielly (2010) p 231 describes the sinking of LCS(L)(3)-33 on April 12, 1945 "Under attack by three kamikazes, she downed the first one and a Val struck the starboard side, setting her on fire. The call to abandon ship was made and the crew went into the water. Purdy sank her flaming hulk with two five-inch rounds"
  63. ^ LCS-52 was damaged by the near-miss of kamikaze
  64. ^ LCS(L)-61 was damaged by the near-miss of kamikaze
  65. ^ USS LCT-1075 sunk from debris from a kamakize that hit SS Marcus Daly, which was nearby
  66. ^ USS Little was struck by four kamikazes
  67. ^ The burning Logan Victory was scuttled
  68. ^ USS LSM-59 sank while escorting fleet tug USS Lipan (ATF-85) with USS Barry (APD-29) in tow. Barry was damaged twice by kamikazes the previous day (see 24 May 1945 and 21 June)
  69. ^ Warner p 328 gives the date of the sinking as April 6, 1945. However, the Naval Historical Center listing and the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships indicate that USS LST-447 sank on April 7, 1945, following a kamikaze attack.
  70. ^ USS LST-472 was scuttled by destroyer USS Hall (DD-583)
  71. ^ USS LST-534 was deemed beyond economical repair and towed to sea and sunk off Okinawa, 9 December 1945
  72. ^ LST-700 is shown in Cressman damaged on 12 January, Rielly shows she was damaged 13 January.
  73. ^ USS LST-738 was scuttled by destroyer USS Hall (DD-583)
  74. ^ USS LST-750 was scuttled by destroyer USS Edwards (DD-619)
  75. ^ Decommissioned, and sunk 6 February 1946, due to damage from a kamikaze attack on 1 April 1945
  76. ^ USS Mahan was scuttled by destroyer Walke (DD-723)
  77. ^ USS Mannert L. Abele was sunk by an Ohka. USS Mannert L. Abele was the first U.S. Navy ship to be sunk or damaged by that type of weapon
  78. ^ USS Mississinewa was sunk by kaiten (launched by Japanese submarine I-47 or I-36. USS Mississinewa was the first U.S. Navy ship sunk or damaged by a kaiten)
  79. ^ USS Mullany was hit by two kamikazes
  80. ^ SS Newcomb was struck by five kamikazes within an hour and a half
  81. ^ USS Ommaney Bay was irreparably damaged. Destroyer USS Burns (DD-588) scuttled Ommaney Bay, 11°25'N, 121°19'E
  82. ^ USS PC-1603 was struck by two kamikaze, towed to Kerama Retto. The hulk was ordered destroyed on 24 October 1945 and was incorporated in the building of a breakwater/dock
  83. ^ USS Porcupine was ultimately scuttled by Gansevoort
  84. ^ USS Prichett was damaged by the near-miss of suicide plane, as she was assisting USS Callaghan. The depth of desperation reached by the Japanese kamikaze forces,as Callaghan is sunk by a bomb-carrying WILLOW (a Japanese biplane primary trainer)!
  85. ^ USS Richard P. Leary is listed in Cressman as damaged by a kamikaze, DANFS does not indicate damage that date.
  86. ^ USS Saratoga is shown as damaged by kamikaze and a bomb in Cressman, no indication of kamikaze strike in DANFS
  87. ^ USS Skirmish shot down a Mitsubishi G4M "Betty" which scattered its parts across her forecastle deck as it passed over her bow, crashing to starboard
  88. ^ The Naval Historical Center listing states that USS St. Lo was sunk by Japanese aircraft on October 25, 1944, but there is no mention of kamikaze. However, several sources (e.g., Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships;) describe the sinking of St. Lo when a Zero carrying a bomb hit the escort carrier.
  89. ^ |USS Stanly absorbed the baka's impact on the starboard side of her bow, five feet above the waterline. Fortunately, the warhead continued through Stanly, passed out her port side, and exploded in the water close aboard. Within minutes of the first attack, another baka whisked over the ship and snatched her ensign from its gaff in passing.
  90. ^ USS Starr was damaged by the explosion of assault demolition boat that exploded when it contacted one of a cluster of Starr's landing craft that were moored alongside.
  91. ^ USS Telfair was struck by two kamikazes
  92. ^ USS Ticonderoga was struck by two kamikazes
  93. ^ USS Twiggs was first struck by an aerial torpedo, then by the torpedo-dropping kamikaze aircraft
  94. ^ See USS Tyrrell on 3 April 1945
  95. ^ USS Underhill was damaged by kaiten launched from Japanese submarine I 53, cutting the ship in two. After rescuing the Underhill' survivors, she was scuttled by submarine chasers PC-803 and PC-804, and escort patrol vessel PCE-872.
  96. ^ USS Vammen struck a heavy floating object with her bow at 2100. A few seconds later, an explosion occurred beneath her stern, as though a depth charge had exploded under the ship, possibly depth charge dropped by Japanese assault demolition boat, or the boat itself
  97. ^ HMS Victorious reported that on 4 May 1945, Concentrated KAMIKAZE attacks and 7 destroyed but 3 hit selected targets. One exploded on island structure causing fires and damage to boiler steam piping. Speed reduced to 19 knots. Air operations resumed after 8 hours.
  98. ^ HMS Victorious reported that on 9 May, she was hit twice in unexpected KAMIKAZE attacks. The first damaged the Flight Deck and equipment but second failed to explode. 3 killed and 19 of ship's company injured. Capability reduced due to damaged forward lift but remained operational.
  99. ^ USS Walke was attacked by four kamikazes
  100. ^ USS Walter Colton had a kamikaze crash alongside; the ship received additional damage from friendly fire from nearby ships in the anchorage
  101. ^ USS Ward was scuttled by destroyer USS O'Brien (DD-725)
  102. ^ USS Ward (DD-139) fired the first shot at Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941 when she shot at, hit and sunk a Japanese mini submarine just outside the harbor entrance.
  103. ^ Although William Sharon was abandoned, salvage vessel USS Grapple (ARS-7) later tows Sharon to San Pedro Bay for repairs.
  104. ^ USS YMS-327 was damaged by kamikaze and by friendly fire
  105. ^ USS Zeilin was damaged by four near-miss kamikazes
Ship events in 1944
Ship launches: 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
Ship commissionings: 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
Ship decommissionings: 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
Shipwrecks: 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949