List of American Aero Squadrons

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Air Service recruiting poster, 1918
Roundel of the Air Service, United States Army used on planes in the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I

This is a partial list of original Air Service, United States Army "Aero Squadrons" before and during World War I. Units formed after 1 January 1919 are not listed.

Overview[edit]

In January 1918 a new numbering scheme for aero squadrons was set up. Numbers 1–399 would be for Aero Service Squadrons (AS). 400–599 Aero Construction Squadrons (ACS), 600–799 Aero Supply Squadrons and 800–1099 Aero Repair Squadrons. Non-notable support squadrons are not listed.

The numerical designation of school squadrons at the various flying fields in the United States was discontinued in July 1918, and replaced by letter designation. For example, the 2d Aero Squadron became Squadron A, Kelly Field. In November 1918, the personnel of the lettered squadrons of each flying field was merged into a single Flying School Detachment at such station.

  Formed prior to 2 April 1917
  American Expeditionary Force combat squadron
  Planned American Expeditionary Force combat squadron (never entered combat)
  Currently active as United States Air Force/Air National Guard squadron

In addition to the Aero Squadrons, whose mission supported airplanes in one way or another, Air Service Spruce Squadrons have been noted and listed. A part of the Signal Corps, they were located in Oregon and Washington states. When the U.S. entered World War I, it was quickly discovered that the nation had no capacity to build warplanes in quantity. Spruce timber, vital to wing construction was in critically short supply. In 1918, the United States Army stepped in and took over the production of airplane spruce in the pacific northwest, with the Spruce Production Division organizing loggers and constructing a plant to process the wood, construct roads and railroads into the forests to access and cut the timber.

Men in the Spruce Squadrons were part of the Signal Corps along with the Aero Squadrons, as the Signal Corps oversaw all Army aviation. About 50,000 soldiers were assigned to Spruce Squadrons, overseeing about 100,000 lumber workers, were assigned to small camps in the Pacific Northwest. Many of these men were itching to go "over there" and take part in combat, however, their labor and skills to produce spruce lumber were needed far more, in the forests of the Pacific Northwest to produce the materiel needed to build aircraft. The camps where the soldiers were located are listed on the individual squadron entry.

Squadrons[edit]

1st to 24th Aero Squadrons[edit]

At the time of the United States entry into World War I in April 1917, three Aero Squadrons had been formed. The 1st and 3d were in the United States, and the 2d was in the Philippines. The 6th, being destined for Hawaii and the 7th, destined for the Panama Canal Zone were organizing. The 4th and 5th, to be based in the continental United States had yet to receive personnel.

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
1st Aero Squadron 5 March 1913 Formed as: 1st Provisional Aero Squadron
Pre-WWI service in Mexico and Texas[1]

AEF: 6 April 1918 – 12 May 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with I Corps Observation Group
  • Most senior organization in the United States Air Force
  • Returned to the United States in August 1919, stationed at Park Field, Tennessee
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 1st Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 1st Observation Squadron on 15 November 1922; Reorganized and re-designated 1st Bombardment Squadron on 1 March 1935;[2]
  • Currently: 1st Reconnaissance Squadron, Beale AFB, California[3]
2d Aero Squadron 1 December 1915 Formed as: 1st Company, 2d Aero Squadron
Pre-WWI service in the Philippines[1]

Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: 18 November 1918
  • Constituted in the Air Service, United States Army on 3 June 1919 at Rockwell Field, California, as the 2d Aero Squadron; Transferred on 24 December 1919 to the Philippines assigned to the Philippine Department.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 2d Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 2d Aero Squadron; Re-designated as: 2d Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923[2]
  • Stationed at Nichols Field, Philippines on 7 December 1941, subsequently wiped out in the 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines; Inactivated 2 April 1946.; >Re-activated 1 January 1949.
  • Currently: 2d Air Refueling Squadron, McGuire AFB, New Jersey<[3]
3d Aero Squadron 1 November 1916 Pre-WWI service in Texas[1]

Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Post Field, Oklahoma, July 1918
Demobilized: 2 January 1919
  • Constituted in the Air Service, United States Army on 13 May 1919 at Mitchel Field, NY, as the 3d Aero Squadron; Transferred on 5 July 1919 to the Philippines assigned to the Philippine Department.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 3d Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 3rd Pursuit Squadron on 25 January 1923
    Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 3rd Aero Squadron[2]
  • Stationed at Clark Field, Philippines on 7 December 1941, subsequently wiped out in the 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines; Inactivated 2 April 1946.
  • Re-designated 3d Tactical Fighter Squadron on 12 March 1973; Activated on 15 March 1973' Currently: 3d Flying Training Squadron, Vance AFB, Oklahoma[3]
4th Aero Squadron 5 May 1917 Initially formed as an un-designated unit, December 1916 when the United States Army established seven air squadrons[1]

Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron B, Post Field, Oklahoma, July 1918
Demobilized: 2 January 1919
  • Constituted in the Air Service, United States Army on 23 June 1919 at Hazelhurst Field, NY, as the 4th Aero Squadron; Transferred on 24 January 1920 to Luke Field, Hawaii assigned to the Hawaiian Department.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 4th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 4th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923
    Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 4th Aero Squadron; Reorganized and re-designated 4th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium Range) on 25 January 1938[2]
  • Assigned to Hickam Field, Hawaii on 7 December 1941, largely destroyed during the Pearl Harbor Attack; Re-designated 394th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 April 1942
  • Currently: 394th Combat Training Squadron, Whiteman AFB, Missouri[3]
5th Aero Squadron 5 May 1917 Initially formed as an un-designated unit, December 1916 when the United States Army established seven air squadrons[1]

Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Souther Field, Georgia, July 1918
Demobilized: 11 November 1918
  • Constituted in the Air Service, United States Army on 23 June 1919 at Hazelhurst Field, NY, as the 5th Aero Squadron; Transferred in November 1919 to Mitchel Field, NY
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 5th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated 5th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated in April 1924 with the 5th Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 5th Reconnaissance Squadron, Beale AFB, California[3]
6th Aero Squadron 13 March 1917 Initially formed as an un-designated unit, December 1916 when the United States Army established seven air squadrons[1]

Garrisoned at: Luke Field, Ford Island, Hawaii
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 6th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 6th Pursuit Squadron on 25 January 1923
    Re-designated: 6th Pursuit Squadron on January 25, 1923[2] Re-designated: 6th Night Fighter Squadron on January 17, 1943; Inactivated on 20 February 1947 [3]
7th Aero Squadron 29 March 1917 Initially formed as an un-designated unit, December 1916 when the United States Army established seven air squadrons[1][3]

Garrisoned in Panama Canal Zone
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 7th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated: 7th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1925; Participated in the “Goodwill Flights” to El Salvador and Nicaragua 13–19 March 1935, to Columbia 14–18 December 1936, to Guatemala 8–11 February 1938 and El Salvador 19–22 April 1938. Flew mercy missions to support earthquake relief efforts in and near Santiago, Chile, 28 January-13 February 1939[2] Re-designated: 397th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 11 May 1942; Inactivated on 1 November 1946.[3]
8th Aero Squadron 21 June 1917 AEF: 8 December 1917 – 3 May 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with IV and VI Corps Observation Groups
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919 and assigned to Kelly Field, Texas; Re-designated 8th Surveillance Squadron; Transferred on 13 August 1919, less Flight B, to the U. S. Army Airdrome, McAllen, TX. Participated in the Mexican Border Patrol operations August 1919-June 1921 and flood relief operations in the Rio Grande Valley in June 1922. Flight B transferred 13 August 1920 to Pope Field, NC.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 8th Squadron (Attack) on 14 March 1921; Entire squadron transferred 2 July 1921 to Kelly Field, TX. Re-designated as the 8th Attack Squadron 25 March 1923; Reorganized and re-designated 8th Bombardment Squadron on 1 December 1939[2]
  • Currently: 8th Special Operations Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida[3]
9th Aero Squadron 14 June 1917 AEF: 28 October 1917 – 8 June 1919
Night Observation Squadron
Combat with First Army Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919 and assigned to March Field, California
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 9th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Inactivated on 29 June 1922 at March Field; Re-designated as the 9th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923. Re-designated as the 9th Bombardment Squadron 24 March 1923; Organized by June 1929 in the Regular Army Reserve at Kelly Field, TX. Conducted annual summer training at Kelly Field; Activated on 1 April 1931, less Reserve personnel, at March Field, CA. Transferred on 5 December 1934 to Hamilton Field, CA. Re-designated as the 9th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 December 1939; Transferred on 7 September 1940 to Fort Douglas, UT. Transferred on 13 January 1941 to Salt Lake City, UT.
  • Ground elements departed from the port of San Francisco on 6 November on an army transport en route to the Philippines. Aircraft and crews began departing Muroc Field, CA, on 6 December en route to Hawaii. Elements of the squadron flew their B-17s into Hickam Field at the height of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor[2]
  • Currently: 9th Bomb Squadron, Dyess AFB, Texas[3]
10th Aero Squadron 31 May 1917 AEF: 26 December 1917-May 1919
Service Support Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[4]
11th Aero Squadron 26 June 1917 AEF: 1 January 1918 – 1 May 1919
Day Bombardment Squadron
Combat with 1st Day Bombardment Group
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919, assigned to Fort Bliss, Texas; Participated in the Mexican Border Patrol August–November 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 11th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 11th Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923; Conducted bombing tests on obsolete warships off Chesapeake Bay 5 September 1923; Transferred on 5 December 1934 to Hamilton Field, CA. Transferred on 2 September 1940 to Fort Douglas, UT. Transferred on 18 January 1941 to Salt Lake City, UT.
  • Ground elements departed from Salt Lake City 13 November 1941 and sailed from the port of San Francisco on 21 November on an army transport en route to the Philippines. Aircraft and crews began departing Muroc Field, CA, on 6 December en route to Hawaii. Elements of the squadron flew their B-17s into Hickam Field at the height of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941;[2] fought in the Pacific Theater during World War II; Inactivated on 2 November 1945.
    Consolidated (11 January 1982) with 11th Pilotless Bomber Squadron, Light, which was constituted on 17 June 1954; Activated on 1 September 1954; Re-designated 11th Tactical Missile Squadron on 8 June 1955; Re-designated 11th Bomb Squadron on 24 June 1994
  • Currently: 11th Bomb Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana [3]
12th Aero Squadron 2 June 1917 AEF: 16 January 1918 – 17 June 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with I Corps Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919, assigned to Scott Field, Illinois; Transferred on 13 October 1919 to Kelly Field, TX, then on 9 January 1920 to Biggs Field, TX. Participated in the Mexican Border Patrol January 1920-May 1921 and Forest Fire Patrol May–August 1921
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 12th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated 12th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923; Flew reconnaissance missions in April 1929 for the 10th Cavalry in the vicinity of Nogales, NM, during the Escobar-Topete Revolution.[2]
  • Currently: 12th Reconnaissance Squadron, Beale AFB, California[3]
13th Aero Squadron 14 June 1917 AEF: 26 December 1917 – 13 March 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 2d Pursuit Group
Demobilized on 29 March 1919
  • Constituted in the Regular Army on 3 June 1919 at Rockwell Field, California, as the 104th Aero Squadron; Transferred on 6 July 1919 to Scott Field, IL. Transferred on 6 November 1919, less one flight, to Biggs Field, TX. One flight operated from Camp Marfa, TX, until 3 September 1920. Another flight operated from Post Field, OK.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 13th Squadron (Attack) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 13th Attack Squadron on 25 January 1923. Inactivated on 27 June 1924 at Kelly Field; Organized in June 1924 in the Regular Army Reserve at Kelly Field, TX. Conducted summer training at Fort Crockett, TX; Activated on 1 November 1929, less Reserve personnel, at Barksdale Field, LA;[2] Consolidated with 13th Aero Squadron, 16 October 1936
  • Currently: 13th Bomb Squadron, Whiteman AFB, Missouri [3]
14th Aero Squadron 9 May 1917 Formed as: 1st Aviation School Squadron
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: 23 November 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps on 1 April 1928 at Bolling Field, District of Columbia, as Air Corps Detachment, Bolling Field, and assigned to the Office of Chief of the Air Corps; re-designated 1 March 1935 as the 14th Bombardment Squadron; Consolidated on 8 June 1935 with the 14th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 1 September 1936 at Bolling Field
    Organized by December 1937 in the Regular Army Reserve; Conducted summer training at Kelly Field, TX
  • Activated on 1 February 1940, less Reserve personnel, at Hickam Field, TH; Re-designated as the 14th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 November 1940. Transferred by flying to Clark Field, Philippines on 16 September 1941; Transferred on 6 December 1941 to Del Monte Field, Philippines;[2] Squadron was mostly wiped out in the 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines, surviving personnel and aircraft transferred to Australia in December 1941, later re-assigned to other units
  • Inactivated on April 2, 1946; Disbanded on August 19, 1949; Never again activated.[3]
15th Aero Squadron 9 May 1917 Formed as 2d Aviation School Squadron
Training Squadron: Hazelhurst Field, New York
Demobilized: 18 September 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 15th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 15th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated in 1924 with the 15th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 1 August 1927; Activated on 15 May 1928; Re-designated: 15th Observation Squadron (Medium) on 13 Jan 1942;[2]
  • Currently: 15th Reconnaissance Squadron, Creech AFB, Nevada[3]
16th Aero Squadron 9 May 1917 Formed as: 3d Aviation School Squadron
AEF: 8 January 1918 – 7 May 1919
Construction Squadron
Demobilized: 22 May 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 16th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 16th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 16th Aero Squadron;[2] Re-designated 16th Reconnaissance Squadron (Bomber) on 31 May 1943; Reconstituted on 19 September 1985 and consolidated with 16th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron as 16th Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron
  • Currently: 16th Electronic Warfare Squadron, Eglin AFB, Florida[3]
17th Aero Squadron 16 June 1917 AEF: 4 August 1917 – 20 March 1919
Pursuit Squadron (Primarily assigned to Royal Air Force)
Demobilized: 1 April 1919
  • The 147th Aero Squadron returned from AEF to Selfridge Field, MI in June 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 17th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 17th Pursuit Squadron on 25 January 1923; Reconstituted, and consolidated (17 October 1936) with 17th Aero Squadron
  • Departed from the port of San Francisco, CA, about mid-November 1940 on the U.S.A.T. Etolin and arrived in the Philippines; Transferred on 5 December 1940 to Nichols Field, Philippines;[2] Squadron was wiped out in the 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines, survivors reached Australia in March 1942 and were reassigned to other units, Inactivated on 2 April 1946
  • Activated and organized on 1 December 1971 as 17th Wild Weasel Squadron; Currently: 17th Weapons Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada[3]
18th Aero Squadron August 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron B, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 18th Observation Squadron on 10 June 1922; Consolidated on 17 March 1925 with the 18th Aero Squadron; Reorganized and re-designated 40th Attack Squadron on 1 March 1935; consolidated unit re-designated as the 18th Headquarters Squadron, Bolling Field, District of Columbia.;[2] Reconstituted and consolidated (1964) with 18th Observation Squadron (Long Range, Light Bombardment) which was constituted on March 1, 1935; Re-designated: 408th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on April 22, 1942; Inactivated on April 29, 1946; Re-designated 408th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on October 6, 1958; Discontinued, and inactivated, on January 1, 1962.[3]
19th Aero Squadron 14 June 1917 Formed as 14th Aero Squadron
AEF: 1 January 1918 – 5 April 1919
Day Bombardment Training Squadron
Demobilized: 14 April 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 19th Squadron (Pursuit) on 30 August 1921; Inactivated on 29 June 1922; Re-designated 19th Pursuit Squadron on 25 January 1923 and activated 1 May 1923;[2] Re-designated: 19th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942
  • Currently 19th Fighter Squadron, Hickam Field, Hawaii[3]
20th Aero Squadron 26 June 1917 AEF: 31 December 1917- 2 May 1919
Day Bombardment Squadron
Combat with 1st Day Bombardment Group
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919, assigned to Ellington Field, Texas; Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 20th Squadron (Bombardment) on 30 August 1921; Re-designated as the 20th Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923. Conducted bombing tests on obsolete warships off Chesapeake Bay 5 September 1923[2]
  • Currently: 20th Bomb Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana [3]
21st Aero Squadron 13 June 1917 AEF: 23 January 1918 – 6 April 1919
Instructional flying squadron
Demobilized: 14 April 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 21st Observation Squadron on 24 March 1923, consolidated with 21st Aero Squadron, same date; Demobilized on 1 October 1933. Reconstituted and consolidated with the 21st Observation Squadron on 2 December 1936; The 21st Observation Squadron was constituted in the Army Air Forces on 1 March 1935;[2] Re-designated: 411th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1942;Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946; Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with 911th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, which was constituted on 28 May 1958
  • Currently: 911th Air Refueling Squadron, MacDill AFB, Florida[3]
22d Aero Squadron 20 June 1917 AEF: 16 February 1918 – 15 June 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 2d Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 17 June 1919
The 135th Aero Squadron returned from AEF to Post Field, OK in June 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 22d Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 22nd Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 17 April 1937 with the 22d Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 22d Intelligence Squadron, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland [3]
23d Aero Squadron 23 June 1917 Formed as 18th Aero Squadron
AEF: 25 July 1918 – 8 March 1919
Served as Repair Squadron
Demobilized: 22 March 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 22d Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; re-designated 23d Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923 Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 23d Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently 23d Bomb Squadron, Minot AFB, North Dakota[3]
24th Aero Squadron 1 May 1917 AEF: 24 January 1918 – 2 August 1919
Army Observation Squadron
Combat with First Army Observation Group
Demobilized: 1 October 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 24th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 24th Pursuit Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 24th Aero Squadron;[2] Served in Panama Canal Zone. Inactivated on 15 October 1946[3]

25th to 49th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
25th Aero Squadron 13 June 1917 AEF: 24 January 1918 – 6 June 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 4th Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 17 June 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 25th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921; Assigned to the Panama Canal Department; Re-designated as the 25th Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated (1924) with 25th Aero Squadron.[2]
  • Currently: 25th Space Range Squadron, Schriever AFB, Colorado[3]
26th Aero Squadron 26 May 1917 Formed as: 1st Reserve Aero Squadron
AEF 17 September 1917 – 27 May 1919
Instructional Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 7 June 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 26th Squadron (Attack) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 26th Attack Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 26th Aero Squadron; Re-designated: 26th Bombardment Squadron on 6 December 1939;[2] Inactivated on 20 October 1948
    Re-designated 26th Tactical Fighter Squadron on 24 September 1973; Activated on 30 September 1973
  • Currently: 26th Space Aggressor Squadron (USAFR), Schriever AFB, Colorado[3]
27th Aero Squadron 8 May 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-19 Mar 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 1st Pursuit Group
Medal of Honor recipient: Lt Frank Luke
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919, assigned to Selfridge Field, Michigan
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 27th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 27th Pursuit Squadron on 25 January 1923;[2] Re-designated: 27th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942
  • Currently: 27th Fighter Squadron, Langley AFB, Virginia [3]
28th Aero Squadron 22 June 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918 – 31 May 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 3d Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 16 June 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 28th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921; Consolidated on 9 January 1922 with the 28th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 28 June 1922 at Mather Field.
  • Activated on 1 September 1922 at Clark Field, PI, and assigned to the Philippine Department;[2] Squadron suffered severe losses in the 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines, withdrawn to Australia, December 1941. Fought in Pacific Theater, Inactivated on 1 October 19834
    Re-activated 1 July 1987
  • Currently: 28th Bomb Squadron, Dyess AFB, Texas [3]
29th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Brooks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 29th Pursuit Squadron on 23 March 1924; Consolidated in 1935 with the 29th Aero Squadron;[2] Re-designated 29th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 23 March 1953
  • Currently 29th Training Systems Squadron, Eglin AFB, Florida [3]
30th Aero Squadron 13 June 1917 AEF 19 September 1917 – 5 April 1919
Instructional Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 7 June 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 30th Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923; Transferred on 25 October 1935 to March Field, CA. Re-designated as the 30th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 December 1939. Transferred on 1 June 1941 to Albuquerque, NM.
  • Departed from the port of San Francisco on 4 October 1941 on the U.S.A.T. Willard A. Holbrook and arrived at Manila, PI, on 23 October 1941. Transferred to Clark Field, PI, the same day.[2] Squadron suffered severe losses in the 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines, was withdrawn to Australia in December 1941. Returned to combat in Pacific Theater in 1944, remained in Far East Air Force after World War II ended, engaged in strategic bombardment of North Korea, 1950-1953; inactivated 1 February 1963.
  • Consolidated 19 September 1985 with United States Air Force Thunderbirds, Nellis AFB, Nevada[3]
31st Aero Squadron 26 June 1917 AEF: 16 September 1917 – 5 April 1919
Instructional Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 14 April 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 31st Bombardment Squadron on 24 March 1923; Transferred on 5 December 1934 to Hamilton Field, CA.
  • Departed from the port of San Francisco on the U.S.A.T. Republic on 1 February 1938 to reinforce the Hawaiian Department. Arrived at Honolulu, TH, on 8 February 1938 and transferred to Hickam Field, TH, the same day;[2] Squadron suffered severe losses in the Pearl Harbor Attack, was re-equipped and returned to combat in the Pacific Theater in 1942, remained in Far East Air Force after World War II ended, engaged in strategic bombardment of North Korea, 1950-1953; inactivated 1 February 1963
  • Reactivated 1 July 1986; Currently: 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron, Edwards AFB, California[3]
32d Aero Squadron 13 June 1917 AEF: 20 September 1917 – 5 April 1919
Aircraft Repair Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 5 April 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 31st Bombardment Squadron on 24 March 1923;[2] Deployed to European Theater of Operations (ETO) in August 1942; Discontinued, and inactivated, on 8 June 1964; Re-activated as 32d Air Refueling Squadron on 23 December 1964
  • Currently: 32d Air Refueling Squadron, McGuire AFB, New Jersey[3]
33d Aero Squadron 12 June 1917 AEF: 16 September 1917 – 5 April 1919
Aircraft Repair Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 5 April 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 33d Pursuit Squadron on 24 March 1923;[2] World War II service as part of the Iceland Base Command (IBC), Inactivated on 22 June 1945; Re-designated as 33d Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 3 March 1953 and re-activated
  • Currently: 33d Special Operations Squadron, Cannon AFB, New Mexico[3]
34th Aero Squadron 10 May 1917 Formed as: 2d Company "H", Camp Kelly, Texas
AEF: 19 September 1917 – 27 May 1919
Instructional Squadron, 2d Air Instructional Center, Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized, 10 April 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 34th Pursuit Squadron on 24 March 1923; Reorganized and re-designated as the 34th Attack Squadron on 1 March 1935; Reorganized and re-designated as the 34th Bombardment Squadron on 17 October 1939;[2] World War II service in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO)
  • Currently: 34th Bomb Squadron, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota[3]
35th Aero Squadron 12 June 1917 AEF: 20 September 1917 – 9 March 1919
Aircraft Repair Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 19 March 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 35th Pursuit Squadron on 24 March 1923;[2] Re-designated: 35th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; fought in Pacific Theater during World War II; Korean War 1950-1953
  • Currently 35th Fighter Squadron, Kunsan AB, South Korea[3]
36th Aero Squadron 12 June 1917 AEF: 19 September 1917 – 25 March 1919
Aircraft Repair Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 7 April 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 36th Pursuit Squadron on 24 March 1923;[2] Re-designated: 36th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; fought in Pacific Theater during World War II; Korean War 1950-1953
  • Currently 36th Fighter Squadron, Osan AB, South Korea.[3]
37th Aero Squadron 13 June 1917 AEF: 18 September 1917 – 5 April 1919
Aircraft Repair Squadron, 3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized, 7 April 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 37th Pursuit Squadron on 24 March 1923; Re-designated as the 37th Bombardment Squadron on 1 December 1939;[2] Deployed to European Theater of Operations (ETO) during World War II
  • Currently 37th Bomb Squadron, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota[3]
38th Aero Squadron August 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Chanute Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 37th Pursuit Squadron on 24 March 1923; Activated on 1 August 1933 at Selfridge Field, MI; Consolidated in 1933 with the 38th Aero Squadron, Reorganized and re-designated 38th Observation Squadron
  • Aircraft and crews began departing Hamilton Field, CA, on 6 December en route to Hawaii. Elements of the squadron flew their B-17s into Hickam Field at the height of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor,[2] suffered severe damage and was returned to the United States. Re-designated: 427th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 April 1942; Deployed to European Theater of Operations (ETO), 12 September 1942; Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 January 1962.
  • Re-activated as 427th Reconnaissance Squadron, 1 May 2012, assigned to Beale AFB, California[3]
39th Aero Squadron December 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Rich Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 39th School Squadron on 24 March 1923; Activated on 1 August 1927 at Kelly Field, TX and attached to the Air Corps Advanced Flying School. Consolidated in 1933 with the 39th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 1 September 1936; Reactivated on 1 February 1940 at France Field, CZ, and assigned to the Panama Canal Department; Returned to the United States 15 March 1944, re-designated: 101st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron; inactivated 25 December 1945.[3]
40th Aero Squadron July 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Selfridge Field, Michigan, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 40th Squadron (School) on 10 June 1922; Re-designated as the 40th School Squadron on 25 January 1923. Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 40th Aero Squadron; Reorganized and re-designated 40th Attack Squadron on 1 March 1935 and attached to the Air Corps Advanced Flying School. Relieved from the Air Corps Advanced Flying School 1 September 1936, assigned to the General Headquarters Air Force, and inactivated at Kelly Field, TX; Disbanded on 1 July 1940.[2]
41st Aero Squadron 9 July 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918 – 28 June 1919
Pursuit Squadron
5th Pursuit Group (Did not see combat)
Demobilized: 2 July 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 41st Squadron (School) on 10 June 1922; Organized on 7 July 1922 at Kelly Field, TX. Re-designated as the 41st School Squadron on 25 January 1923. Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 41st Aero Squadron; Reorganized and re-designated 1 March 1935 as the 41st Observation Squadron (Long Range, Amphibian), assigned to the 2nd Wing, and attached to the Air Corps Advanced Flying School. Re-designated as the 41st Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 September 1936; Inactivated at Kelly Field, TX and re-organized on 20 January 1937 as a Regular Army Reserve unit at Love Field, Dallas, TX; Activated on 1 February 1940 at Langley Field, VA;[2] deploying in early 1943 to Twelfth Air Force in North Africa. Engaged in long-range strategic bombing missions in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO) 1943-1945; Inactivated on 28 February 1946. Reactivated as SAC B-47 Squadron on 11 August 1958;
  • Inactivated as SAC 429th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 1 January 1962 [3]
42d Aero Squadron July 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron I, Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 42d School Squadron on 10 June 1922
    Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 42d Aero Squadron
    Reorganized and re-designated 42d Bombardment Squadron on 1 March 1935
    Inactivated on 1 February 1963 as the 42d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio[3]
  • Re-designated and activated as 42d Attack Squadron, 9 November 2006, Creech AFB, Nevada.[6]
43d Aero Squadron 13 June 1917 AEF: 25 October 1918 – 17 April 1919
Instructional Squadron
Demobilized: 17 April 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 43d Squadron (School) on 10 June 1922; Organized on 7 July 1922 at Kelly Field, TX. Re-designated as the 43rd School Squadron on 25 January 1923. Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 43rd Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 1 September 1936 at Kelly Field, TX.;[3] Consolidated (1939) with the 43d Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) which was constituted on 22 December 1939; Re-designated: 43d Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942
  • Currently: 43d Fighter Squadron, Tyndall AFB, Florida[3]
44th Aero Squadron July 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron K (later P), Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio. July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 44th Squadron (Observation) on 10 June 1922; Organized on 26 June 1922 at Post Field, OK; Re-designated as the 44th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923. Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 44th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 31 July 1927
    Activated on 1 April 1931 at France Field, CZ; Re-designated: 430th Bombardment Squadron, 22 April 1942; Returned to the United States 31 October 1942; Re-designated: 430th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 March 1944, saw combat in Pacific Theater; Inactivated on 14 April 1946[3]
45th Aero Squadron July 1917 Transferred from Chandler Field, Pennsylvania
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron A, Gerstner Field, Louisiana, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
46th Aero Squadron April 1918 Stationed at Ellington Field, Texas
Hazelhurst Field, New York
Roosevelt Field, New York
Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 46th School Squadron on 10 June 1922
    Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 46th Aero Squadron; Assigned to the Air Corps Primary Flying School, Randolph Field, Texas, 31 December 1931.[2]
  • Subsequent history and lineage undetermined.
47th Aero Squadron 20 July 1917 AEF: 19 March 1918-July 1919
Service Squadron
Demobilized: July 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 47th School Squadron on 10 June 1922; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 47th Aero Squadron; Disbanded on 20 Apr 1944.[2]
48th Aero Squadron 4 August 1917 AEF: 4 November 1917 – 29 July 1919
Airfield Construction Squadron, various stations in France
Demobilized, 7 April 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 48th School Squadron on 10 June 1922
    Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 48th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 1 September 1931.
    Re-designated 48th Pursuit Squadron on 1 Mar 1935;[2] Re-designated 48th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; Re-designated 48th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 11 Sep 1952
  • Currently: 48th Flying Training Squadron, Columbus AFB, Mississippi[3]
49th Aero Squadron 6 August 1917 AEF: 24 January 1918-March 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 2d Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 22 March 1919
  • The 166th Aero Squadron returned from AEF to Ellington Field, Texas in June 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 49th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 49th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921. Attached to the 1st Provisional Air Brigade 6 May-3 October 1921 while supporting the battleship bombing tests off the Virginia coast. Transferred on 30 June 1922 to Langley Field, VA. Transferred on 10 August 1922 to Phillips Field, MD. Attached to the Ordnance Department at Aberdeen Proving Ground to conduct tests with newly developed aerial bombs August 1922-January 1928. Re-designated as the 49th Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 16 October 1936 with the 49th Aero Squadron; Unit B-17s located the Italian luxury liner S.S. Rex about 725 miles out to sea on the famous long range interception mission conducted on 12 May 1938; During World War II, deployed to the Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO); Inactivated on 1 April 1963
  • Reactivated as 49th Test Squadron on 1 July 1986; Currently: 49th Test and Evaluation Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana[3]

50th to 74th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
50th Aero Squadron 6 August 1917 AEF: 24 January 1918 – 1 May 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with I Corps Observation Group
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 50th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Attached to the 1st Provisional Air Brigade 6 May-3 October 1921 while supporting the battleship bombing tests off the Virginia coast; Inactivated on 1 August 1927; Activated on 1 November 1930, less Reserve personnel, at Luke Field, Hawaii; Re-designated as the 50th Reconnaissance Squadron;[2] Re-designated 431st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 April 1942; Inactivated on 20 October 1947
  • Re-designated 50th Airmanship Training Squadron and activated on 1 October 1983; Currently: 50th Education Squadron, United States Air Force Academy, Colorado[3]
52d Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as a Construction Squadron at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 464th Aero Squadron (Construction and repair), February 1918
AEF: February 1918-January 1919
Demobilized: February 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 53d School Squadron, and assigned to the 14th School Group, Brooks Field, Texas on 6 February 1923; Consolidated on 14 October 1936 with the 52d Aero Squadron.[2]
  • Subsequent history and lineage undetermined.
53d Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as a Construction Squadron at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 465th Aero Squadron (Construction and repair), February 1918
AEF: February 1918-January 1919
Demobilized: February 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 53d School Squadron, and assigned to the 15th School Group, March Field, California on 6 February 1923; Consolidated on 14 October 1936 with the 53d Aero Squadron; Disbanded on 20 Apr 1944.[2]
54th Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as a Construction Squadron at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 466th Aero Squadron (Construction), February 1918
AEF: February 1918-January 1919
Demobilized: February 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 54th School Squadron, and assigned to the 15th School Group, March Field, California on 6 February 1923; Re-designated as the 58th Service Squadron on 16 January 1923; Reorganized and re-designated 54th Bombardment Squadron on 1 March 1935, assigned to the 2d Bombardment Group, and attached to the Air Corps Tactical School, Maxwell Field, Alabama. Consolidated on 14 October 1936 with the 54th Aero Squadron; Disbanded on 1 May 1942.[2]
55th Aero Squadron 25 Aug 1917 Re-designated: 467th Aero Squadron (Construction), February 1918
AEF: 4 November 1917 – 4 March 1918
Demobilized: 16 March 1919
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service on 24 March 1923 as the 55th Pursuit Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 55th Fighter Squadron, Shaw AFB, South Carolina[3]
63d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Gerstner Field, Louisiana, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
64th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Gerstner Field, Louisiana, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
65th Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated:Instructional flying squadron
Squadron A, Park Field, Tennessee, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service on 6 June 1921 as Air Park No. 10, Luke Field, Hawaii. Re-designated as the 65th Service Squadron on 22 December 1922; The 65th Aero Squadron was consolidated with the 65th Service Squadron on 16 October 1936; Reorganized and re-designated 25 January 1938 as Base Headquarters and 17th Air Base Squadron
  • Disbanded 1 April 1943 as HHS, 17th Service Group.[2]
66th Aero Squadron May 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Eberts Field, Arkansas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service on2 June 1921 as Air Park Ho 11, Nichols Field, Philippines; Re-designated as the 66th Service Squadron on 25 January 1923.; The 66th Aero Squadron was consolidated with the 66th Service Squadron in October 1936; Consolidated unit reorganized and re-designated as Base Headquarters and 20th Air Base Squadron.; Reorganized and re-designated 1 September 1940 as HHS, 20th Air Base Group (Reinforced)[2]
67th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Brooks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
68th Aero Squadron June 1918 Transferred from Rockwell Field, California
Re-designated:Instructional flying squadron
Squadron A, March Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
69th Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
70th Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 70th Service Squadron, and assigned to the 14th School Group, Kelly Field, Texas on 6 February 1923; Consolidated on 27 July 1932 with the 70th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 1 September 1936 at Hamilton Field, California. Personnel and equipment concurrently transferred to the Base Headquarters and 5th Air Base Squadron.[2]
71st Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Love Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
72d Aero Squadron 18 February 1918 AEF: 4 September 1918 – 29 June 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: 11 July 1919[7]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service on 6 February 1923 as the 72d Bombardment Squadron. Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 72d Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 72d Test and Evaluation Squadron, Eglin AFB, Florida[3]
73d Aero Squadron 26 February 1918 AEF: 5 September 1918 – 19 June 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: 4 July 1919 [7]
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 18 October 1927 as the 73d Headquarters Squadron; Re-designated as the 73d Pursuit Squadron on 8 May 1929; Designated mobilization training station was Dodd Field, Texas, 1927-31.
  • Activated on 15 July 1931, less Reserve personnel, at March Field, California; Reorganized and re-designated 73d Attack Squadron on 1 March 1935; Consolidated on 5 June 1936 with the 73d Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 73d Special Operations Squadron, Cannon AFB, New Mexico[3]
74th Aero Squadron 22 February 1918 Construction Squadron, did not deploy to AEF
Demobilized: 28 January 1919
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 18 October 1927 as the 74th Attack Squadron; Re-designated as the 74th Pursuit Squadron on 8 May 1929; Organized Reserve officers assigned to the unit participated in summer training at Fort Crockett, Texas, 1927–33
  • Activated on 1 October 1933, less Reserve personnel, at Albrook Field, Canal Zone. Consolidated in October 1936 with the 74th Aero Squadron;[2] Served in Panama Canal Zone during World War II as the 74th Bombardment Squadron, equipped with B-24 Liberators. Inactivated 1 November 1946.[3]
  • Re-designated: 135th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 27 March 1951; Activated on 1 May 1951; Inactivated on 1 December 1952.[3]

75th to 99th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
75th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Gerstner Field, Louisiana, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 18 October 1927 as the 75th Attack Squadron; Organized Reserve officers assigned to the unit participated in summer training at Fort Crockett, Texas, 1928–30
  • Activated on 15 September 1930, less Reserve personnel, at Wheeler Field, Hawaii; Consolidated on 16 October 1936 with the 75th Aero Squadron; Reorganized and re-designated Base Headquarters and 18th Air Base Squadron (Single) on 1 March 1938; Disbanded 1 April 1943.[2]
76th Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Carlstrom Field
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Dorr Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
77th Aero Squadron 20 Feb 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Barron Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 18 October 1927 as the 77th Observation Squadron; Re-designated as the 77th Pursuit Squadron on 8 May 1929; Conducted annual summer training at Love Field or Hensley Field, Texas.
  • Activated on 15 November 1930, less Reserve personnel, at Mather Field, California; Consolidated in October 1936 with the 77th Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 77th Fighter Squadron, Shaw AFB, South Carolina[3]
78th Aero Squadron 28 February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Hicks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 18 October 1927 as the 78th Observation Squadron; Re-designated as the 78th Pursuit Squadron on 8 May 1929; Organized Reserve officers assigned to the unit participated in summer training at Kelly Field 1927-30. Designated mobilization training station was Dodd Field, Texas, 1927-30.
  • Activated on 1 April 1931, less Reserve personnel, at France Field, Canal Zone; Consolidated in 1933 with the 78th Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 78th Attack Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada [3]
79th Aero Squadron 22 February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron B, Hicks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 18 October 1927 as the 79th Observation Squadron; Re-designated as the 79th Pursuit Squadron on 8 May 1929
  • Activated on 1 April 1933 at Barksdale Field, Louisiana; Consolidated on 25 May 1933 with the 79th Aero Squadron[2]
  • Currently: 79th Fighter Squadron, Shaw AFB, South Carolina.[3]
80th Aero Squadron March 1918 Transferred from Rich Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron C, Post Field, Oklahoma, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted on 18 October 1927 as the 80th Observation Squadron. Re-designated as the 80th Service Squadron on 8 May 1929. Activated on 15 November 1930 at Mather Field, California. The 80th Aero Squadron was consolidated with the 80th Service Squadron 24 August 1932. Transferred to Albrook Field, Canal Zone, same day.; Reorganized and re-designated Base Headquarters and 15th Air Base Squadron on 1 September 1937; Disbanded on 1 November 1943[2]
81st Aero Squadron March 1918 Transferred from Rich Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Post Field, Oklahoma, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted on 1 March 1935 as the Station Complement, Kelly Field and concurrently activated at Kelly Field, Texas. Reorganized and re-designated 1 September 1936 as the 12th Air Base Squadron and assigned to the Air Corps Advanced Flying School. Concurrently consolidated with the 81st Service Squadron.
    The 81st Aero Squadron was consolidated with the 81st Service Squadron 1 December 1936.; Reorganized and re-designated 1 September 1940 as HHS, 12th Air Base Group (Special).[2]
82d Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron C, Hicks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
84th Aero Squadron August 1917 Flying School classification squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
85th Aero Squadron 17 August 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918 – 20 July 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with Second Army Observation Group and VI Corps Observation Group
Demobilized 31 July 1919 [5]
86th Aero Squadron 17 August 1917 AEF: 25 March 1918 – 23 May 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
Advanced Branch, 1st Air Depot
Behonne Aerodrome
Demobilized: 26 May 1919[7]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps on 1 March 1935, attached to the Air Corps Tactical School, and organized at Maxwell Field, Alabama; Inactivated on 1 September 1936 at Maxwell Field; Consolidated on 1 December 1936 with the 86th Aero Squadron
  • Activated on 1 February 1940 at Wheeler Field, Hawaii as 86th Observation Squadron; Suffered devastating losses during Pearl Harbor Attack.[2]
  • Currently 43d Electronic Combat Squadron, Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona[3]
87th Aero Squadron December 1917 Transferred from Selfridge Field, Michigan
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron B, Park Field, Tennessee, Julyl 1918
Demobilized: November 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps on 1 March 1935, assigned to the 20th Pursuit Group, and organized at Maxwell Field, AL, with personnel from the 51st and 54th School Squadrons; Attached to the Air Corps Tactical School. Inactivated on 1 September 1936 at Maxwell Field, AL.; Consolidated on 1 December 1936 with the 87th Aero Squadron; Organized on 1 Mar 1935; Inactivated 1 Sep 1936;[2] Reconstituted, and consolidated (21 Mar 1979) with unit constituted as 87th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942
  • Currently: 87th Flying Training Squadron, Laughlin AFB, Texas.[3]
88th Aero Squadron 18 August 1917 AEF: 16 November 1917 – 27 June 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with III Corps Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States on 27 June 1919; Transferred on 5 September 1919 to Langley Field, VA.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 88th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Attached to the 1st Provisional Air Brigade 6 May-3 October 1921 while supporting the battleship bombing tests off the Virginia coast; Re-designated as the 88th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923; Re-designated as the 88th Reconnaissance Squadron (Long Range) on 6 December 1939.
  • Ground elements departed from Fort Douglas 13 November 1941 and sailed from the port of San Francisco on 21 November on an army transport en route to the Philippines. Aircraft and crews began departing Muroc Field, CA, on 6 December en route to Hawaii. Elements of the squadron flew their B-17s into Hickam Field at the height of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor[2]
  • Re-designated: 436th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) 22 April 1942
    Currently: 436th Training Squadron, Dyess AFB, Texas[3]
89th Aero Squadron 19 August 1917 AEF: 16 November 1917 – 25 March 1919
Construction and maintenance squadron
Demobilized: 19 May 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps on 1 March 1935 as the 89th Observation Squadron; Consolidated in October 1936 with the 89th Aero Squadron;[2] Re-designated: 432d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 April 1942; inactivated 26 November 1945.[3]
90th Aero Squadron 20 August 1917 AEF: 20 November 1917 – 5 May 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with III Corps Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States, June 1919 and was assigned to Kelly Field, Texas; Transferred on 29 November 1919 to Sanderson, TX. Participated in the Mexican Border Patrol operations September 1919-June 1921
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 90th Squadron (Attack) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated as the 90th Attack Squadron on 25 June 1923; Transferred on 1 July 1926 to Fort Crockett, TX. Flew border reconnaissance missions from Fort Huachuca, AZ, during the Escobar-Topete Revolution 7 April-2 May 1929; Transferred on 27 February 1935 to Barksdale Field, LA. Reorganized and re-designated 90th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 15 September 1939[2]
  • Currently: 90th Fighter Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska[3]
91st Aero Squadron 21 August 1917 AEF: 15 November 1917 – 17 June 1919
Army Observation Squadron
Combat with First Army Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States June 1919 at Mitchel Field, New York; Transferred to Rockwell Field, CA, on 29 September 1919; Transferred on 3 November 1919 to Mather Field, CA. Transferred on 24 January 1920 to Ream Field, CA. Participated in Mexican Border Patrol operations January 1920-January 1921
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 91st Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921; Re-designated 91st Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923[2]
  • Currently: 91st Network Warfare Squadron, Lackland AFB, Texas[3]
92d Aero Squadron 21 August 1917 AEF: 29 October 1917 – 4 December 1918
Trained for night bombardment, never saw combat
Demobilized 21 December 1918
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps as the 17th Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) on 20 November 1940; Consolidated with the 92d Aero Squadron in 194; Re-designated 433d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 April 1942; Re-designated 867th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy on 21 October 1943
  • Currently 867th Reconnaissance Squadron, Creech AFB, Nevada[3]
93d Aero Squadron 21 August 1917 AEF: 20 October 1917 – 13 March 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 3d Pursuit Group
Demobilized:31 March 1919
  • Constituted in the Regular Army Reserve on 8 May 1929 as the 93rd Attack Squadron; Inactivated on 31 October 1936 at Fort Crockett, Texas by relief of Reserve personnel. Chicago, IL, designated as headquarters location on reorganization, but the unit was never reorganized at that location
  • Consolidated in October 1936 with the 93rd Aero Squadron; Re-designated as the 93rd Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 October 1939 and organized at March Field, CA; Transferred in June 1941 to Albuquerque, NM. Departed from the port of San Francisco on 4 October 1941 on the U.S.A.T. Willard A. Holbrook and arrived at Manila, Philippines, on 23 October 1941. Transferred to Clark Field, Philippines, the same day. Transferred on 6 December 1941 to Del Monte Field, Philippines.;[2] Engaged in 1941-1942 Battle of the Philippines before being withdrawn in late December 1941 to Australia.
  • Currently: 93d Bomb Squadron (AFRES), Barksdale AFB, Louisiana[3]
94th Aero Squadron 20 August 1917 AEF: 10 November 1917-1 Jun 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 1st Pursuit Group
Medal of Honor recipient: Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker
  • Returned to the United States June 1919 at Mitchel Field, New York
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 94th Squadron (Pursuit), 14 March 1921[2]
  • Currently: 94th Fighter Squadron, Langley AFB, Virginia[3]
95th Aero Squadron 20 August 1917 AEF: 10 November 1917-1 Mar 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 1st Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 18 March 1919
  • Re-constituted and organized on 12 August 1919 in the Air Service, United States Army as the 95th Aero Squadron
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 95th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921[2]
  • Currently: 95th Reconnaissance Squadron, Offut AFB, Nebraska[3]
96th Aero Squadron 20 August 1917 AEF: 10 November 1917 – 2 May 1919
Day Bombardment Squadron
Combat with 1st Day Bombardment Group
  • Returned to the United States, June 1919 and stationed at Ellington Field, TX; Participated in Mexican Border Patrols August 1919-10 January 1920
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 96th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921; Attached to the 1st Provisional Air Brigade 20 May-26 October 1921 while supporting the battleship bombing tests off the Virginia coast[2]
  • Currently: 96th Bomb Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana[3]
97th Aero Squadron 20 August 1917 AEF: 15 November 1917 – 20 January 1919
Served as engine maintenance squadron
Demobilized 3 February 1919[9]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps on 1 March 1935; Consolidated on 5 June 1936 with the 97th Aero Squadron;[2] Served during World War II as 97th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, a training unit for desert warfare in the Mojave Desert, Southern California. Disbanded on 15 April 1944.[3][9]
  • Re-activated as: 6949th Security Squadron, 1 Mar 1979; Reconstituted and consolidated (1 Oct 1993) with the 6949th Security Squadron and re-designated the 97th Intelligence Squadron on 1 Oct 1993
  • Currently: 97th Intelligence Squadron
98th Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as the 98th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
AEF: October 1917-January 1919
Demobilized: February 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the United States Army Air Corps as the 98th School Squadron, and assigned to the Air Corps Technical School, Chanute Field, Illinois on 1 August 1933; Consolidated in 1934 with the 98th Aero Squadron; Reorganized and re-designated 98th Service Squadron on 1 March 1935. Reorganized and re-designated 10th Air Base Squadron on 1 July 1936.[2] Subsequent lineage undetermined.
99th Aero Squadron 21 August 1917 AEF: 12 December 1917- 25 May 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with V Corps Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States, June 1919 and stationed at Hazelhurst Field, New York; Transferred on 17 August 1919 to Bolling Field, District of Columbia.
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 99th Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921[2]
  • Currently: 99th Reconnaissance Squadron, Beale AFB, California[3][9]

100th to 149th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
100th Aero Squadron 20 August 1917 AEF: February 1919-June 1919
Day Bombardment Squadron
Assigned to 2d Day Bombardment Group (Did not see combat)
Demobilized: 30 June 1919 [5][9]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps as the 100th Service Squadron on 1 March 1935
    Consolidated in 1935 with the 100th Aero Squadron; Consolidated with the Station Complement, Bolling Field, District of Columbia and consolidated unit re-designated Base Headquarters and 14th Air Base Squadron on 1 September 1936.[2] Subsequent history/lineage undetermined.
101st Aero Squadron 22 August 1917 AEF: 1 January 1918 – 5 April 1919
Service Squadron
Demobilized: 14 April 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 101st Squadron (Observation), and allotted to the state of Massachusetts; Federally recognized on 18 November 1921 at Boston. Stationed at Boston Airport; Consolidated on 20 October 1936 with the 101st Aero Squadron
  • Currently MA ANG 101st Intelligence Squadron [2][5][10]
102d Aero Squadron 23 August 1917 AEF: 9 December 1917 – 19 April 1919
Service Squadron
Demobilized: 1 May 1919 [9]
  • Constituted in the National Guard on 30 December 1920 as the 102nd Squadron (Observation), and allotted to the state of New York; Organized on 17 November 1921 from the Observation Squadron, New York National Guard (organized on 22 March 1921 at Hempstead, Long Island, NY, with personnel from K Company, 14th Infantry, New York National Guard). Concurrently Federally recognized at Hempstead; Consolidated on 20 October 1936 with the 102d Aero Squadron
  • Currently NY ANG 102d Rescue Squadron [2][5][10]
103d Aero Squadron 31 August 1917 Former French Lafayette Escadrille and Lafayette Flying Corps (Escadrille N.124)
AEF: 23 December 1917 – 4 March 1918
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 3d Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 18 August 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 94th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921; Re-constituted and consolidated with the 103d Aero Squadron, 8 April 1924; consolidated unit designated 94th Pursuit Squadron
  • Currently: 94th Fighter Squadron, Langley AFB, Virginia[2][11][12]
104th Aero Squadron 25 August 1917 AEF: 7 December 1917 – 28 April 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with V Corps Observation Group
  • Re-constituted in the Army Air Service as the 13th Squadron (Attack) on 14 March 1921; Consolidated with 13th Aero Squadron, 16 October 1936
  • Currently: 13th Bomb Squadron, Whiteman AFB, Missouri[2][13][14]
105th Aero Squadron 27 August 1917 AEF: 8 December 1917 – 27 April 1919
Service Squadron
Demobilized: 8 May 1919[14]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 136th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Tennessee; Originally organized in the fall of 1920, the squadron was Federally recognized on 4 December 1921 at Blackwood Field, Nashville, TN.
  • Currently TN ANG 105th Airlift Squadron [5][10]
106th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Barron Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
107th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Carlstrom Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
108th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Carlstrom Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
109th Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Carlstrom Field
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Dorr Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
110th Aero Squadron May 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Dorr Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 110th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Missouri; Organized and Federally recognized on 23 June 1923 at Anglum Field, St. Louis, MO. 1st Lt. Charles Lindburgh was a member of the squadron 1925-27.
  • Currently MO ANG 110th Bomb Squadron [5][10]
111th Aero Squadron May 1918 Transferred from Dorr Field, Florida
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated: Squadron C, Carlstrom Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 111th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Texas; Organized in April 1923 and Federally recognized on 29 June 1923 at Ellington Field, Houston, TX.
  • Currently TX ANG 111th Reconnaissance Squadron [5][10]
112th Aero Squadron May 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Chanute Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 112th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Ohio; Organized and Federally recognized on 20 June 1927 at Cleveland Airport, Cleveland, OH
  • Currently OH ANG 112th Fighter Squadron [5][10]
112th Aero Squadron (II) December 1918 Service Squadron, Aviation General Supply Depot Americus, Georgia
Demobilized: December 1919[5]
  • Depot was established in March, 1918 as a general supply depot. The depot was located adjacent to Souther Field. It supplied materiel to aviation fields and in particular to the Air Service training fields: Park Field, TN, Taylor Field, AL, Payne Field, MS, Carlstrom Field, and Dorr Field, FL.[15] The 112th and 287th Aero Squadrons were consolidated into "Aviation Supply Depot Detachment" 1 January 1919.[5]
113th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 113th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Indiana; Organized and Federally recognized on 20 June 1927 at Cleveland Airport, Cleveland, OH
  • Currently IN ANG 113th Air Support Operations Squadron [5][10]
114th Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Scott Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
115th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
116th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Souther Field, Georgia, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
117th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
118th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Brooks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
119th Aero Squadron 5 June 1917 Formed as 5th Aviation School Squadron
Detachment No, 11, Air Service, Aircraft Production
Langley Field, Virginia
Demobilized: 29 May 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 119th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of New Jersey; Organized and Federally recognized on 30 January 1930 at Newark Airport, Newark, NJ,
  • Currently NJ ANG 119th Fighter Squadron [5][10]
120th Aero Squadron 28 August 1917 AEF: 9 March 1918 – 7 May 1919 1919
Service Squadron
Demobilized: 17 May 1919[14]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 120th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Colorado; Organized and Federally recognized on 27 January 1923 at Denver Municipal Airport, Denver, CO, with Flight A located at Denver and Flight B at Pueblo
  • Currently CO ANG 120th Fighter Squadron [5][10]
121st Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Love Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
123d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Eberts Field, Arkansas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
124th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Eberts Field, Arkansas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
125th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Eberts Field, Arkansas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
128th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Taylor Field, Alabama, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
129th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Taylor Field, Alabama, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
131st Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Taylor Field, Alabama, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
132d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
133d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
134th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Brooks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
135th Aero Squadron 1 August 1917 AEF: 31 December 1917 – 7 May 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with IV Corps Observation Group
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919 and Stationed at Post Field, OK; Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 22d Squadron (Observation) on 14 March 1921
  • Currently: 22d Intelligence Squadron, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland [3][14]
136th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Love Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
137th Aero Squadron 9 September 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918-March 1919
Service support squadron
Trained in England entire period
Demobilized: March 1919[5][14]
138th Aero Squadron 28 September 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918-August 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Assigned to 5th Pursuit Group (Did not see combat)Demobilized 30 August 1919 [5][14]
139th Aero Squadron 21 September 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918 – 15 June 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 2d Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 17 June 1919[5][14]
141st Aero Squadron 8 October 1917 AEF: 9 January 1918-July 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 4th Pursuit Group
Demobilized 19 July 1919
  • Constituted in the Army Air Corps as the 341st Fighter Squadron on 24 Sep 1942; Inactivated on 10 May 1946
  • Constituted in the National Guard on 24 May 1946 as the 141st Fighter Squadron, and allotted to the state of New Jersey; 141st Aero Squadron (Pursuit), was reconstituted and allotted to the State of New Jersey and consolidated with the 141st Tactical Fighter Squadron, 8 September 1973
  • Currently: NJ ANG 141st Air Refueling Squadron[5][5][10][10]
142d Aero Squadron 4 October 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-March 1919
Trained as Observation Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: April 1919[5][14]
144th Aero Squadron October 1917 Post Exchange service squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: September 1919 [5][8]
145th Aero Squadron October 1917 Aircraft repair squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: September 1919 [5][8]
147th Aero Squadron 10 November 1917 AEF: 14 March 1918 – 19 March 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 1st Pursuit Group
  • Returned to the United States in June 1919 and Stationed at Selfridge Field, MI
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 17th Squadron (Pursuit) on 14 March 1921
  • Currently: 17th Weapons Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada[5][16]
148th Aero Squadron 11 November 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918 – 22 March 1919
Pursuit Squadron (Primarily assigned to Royal Air Force)
Demobilized: 24 March 1919 [5][17]
149th Aero Squadron 7 December 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-March 1919
Instructional flying squadron (Pursuit)
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]

150th to 199th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
150th Aero Squadron November 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Rich Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
151st Aero Squadron 8 December 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-March 1919
Service support squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]
152d Aero Squadron 8 December 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-March 1919
Trained as Pursuit Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]
153d Aero Squadron 8 December 1917 AEF: 16 February 1918-July1919
Trained as Pursuit Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: July 1919[5][18]
154th Aero Squadron 8 December 1917 AEF: 9 March 1918 – 23 January 1919
Service Squadron
Demobilized: 1 February 1919 [18]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 154th Squadron (Observation), assigned to the 320th Observation Group, and allotted to the Seventh Corps Area. Allotted to the Organized Reserve as a Deferred National Guard unit, and re-designated as the 564th Observation Squadron. Withdrawn from the Organized Reserve on 10 September 1925 and allotted to the Arkansas National Guard as the 154th Observation Squadron; Organized and Federally recognized on 24 October 1925 at Little Rock Airport, Little Rock, AR.; Consolidated on 20 October 1936 with the 154th Aero Squadron
  • Currently AR ANG 154th Training Squadron[3][10]
155th Aero Squadron 1 December 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-March 1919
Night Bombardment squadron, did not reach front lines by the time of the armistice.
Demobilized: March 1919
  • Was the first night bombardment squadron in the AEF. Flew Dayton-Wright DH-4s from 1st Air Depot after the armistice looking for crashed aircraft for recovery.[5][18]
156th Aero Squadron 10 December 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918 - 25 November 1918
Arrived New York City, NY on December 2, 1918 and was mustered out at Air Service Depot, Garden City, Long Island, N.Y.
  • Quarantined in U.S. for measles, mumps, and scarlet fever which delayed departure for AEF. It also probably prevented the squadron from seeing service in France before armistice as their departure was scheduled four days later. Squadron was proud of helping RAF run the Airdrome at TADCASTER (Bramham Moor), Yorkshire during Spanish Influenza epidemics.[19]
157th Aero Squadron 10 December 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-December 1918
Service support squadron
II Corps Aeronautical School
Chatillion-sur-Seine Aerodrome
Demobilized: December 1918[5][18]
158th Aero Squadron 18 December 1917 AEF: 9 September 1918-May 1919
Trained as Pursuit Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: June 1919
  • Squadron was torpedoed on SS Tuscania, 5 February 1918 during overseas transport. Reformed in England but never reached combat.[5][18]
159th Aero Squadron 10 December 1917 AEF: 2 November 1918-March 1919
Trained as Day Bombardment Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: March 1919
  • Squadron was torpedoed on SS Tuscania, 5 February 1918 during overseas transport. Reformed in England but never reached combat.[5][18]
160th Aero Squadron December 1917 Transferred from Kelly Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Park Field, Tennessee, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
161st Aero Squadron 12 December 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-May 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
5th Air Depot
Vinets Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][7][18]
162d Aero Squadron 17 December 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-February 1919
Trained as Pursuit Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: February 1919[5][18]
163d Aero Squadron 18 December 1917 AEF: 6 March 1918-June 1919
Day Bombardment Squadron
Combat with 2d Day Bombardment Group
Demobilized: 13 June 1919[5][18]
164th Aero Squadron November 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Call Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
165th Aero Squadron 26 November 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-June 1919
Service support squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1918[5][18]
166th Aero Squadron 18 December 1917 AEF: 19 March 1919 – 17 June 1919
Day Bombardment Squadron
Combat with 1st Day Bombardment Group
  • Returned to the United States on 17 June 1919 and stationed at Mitchel Field, NY.; Transferred on 26 September 1919 to Kelly Field, TX
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as the 49th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921
    Currently: 49th Test and Evaluation Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana[18][20]
168th Aero Squadron 12 December 1917 AEF: 16 February 1918 – 15 July 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Combat with IV Corps Bombardment Group
Demobilized 22 July 1919[5][18]
169th Aero Squadron 15 December 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-May 1919
Trained as Observation Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: May 1919[5][18]
170th Aero Squadron 18 December 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918-May 1919
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: May 1919[5][18]
171st Aero Squadron 29 November 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-June 1919
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: July 1919[5][18]
172d Aero Squadron 10 December 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-May 1919
Trained as Observation Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: May 1919[5][18]
173d Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 AEF: 9 July 1917-March 1919
Service support squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]
174th Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 AEF: 6 March 1918-April 1919
Trained as Observation Squadron in England, never entered combat
Demobilized: April 1919[5][18]
175th Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Ellington Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Payne Field, Mississippi, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
176th Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-March 1919
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]
178th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Kelly Field, Texas, July, 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
179th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Brooks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
180th Aero Squadron December 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
181st Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Eberts Field, Arkansas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
182d Aero Squadron 22 November 1917 AEF: 31 May 1918-March 1919
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]
183d Aero Squadron December 1917 AEF: May 1918-September 1919
Re-designated: 1st Air Park
V Corps Observation Group
Aircraft/Vehicle maintenance and supply unit
Demobilized: September 1919[5][21]
184th Aero Squadron 2 December 1917 AEF: 7 July 1918-March 1919
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: March 1919[5][18]
185th Aero Squadron 11 November 1917 AEF: 16 February 1918 – 15 May 1919
Night Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 1st Pursuit Group
Demobilized: 30 June 1919 [5][18]
186th Aero Squadron 16 November 1917 AEF: 16 February 1918-June 1919
Army Observation Squadron
Combat with First Army Observation Group
Demobilized: 30 June 1919 [5][18]
188th Aero Squadron 9 November 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918-December 1918
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: December 1918[5][18]
192d Aero Squadron December 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Call Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
193d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Taylor Field, Alabama, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
195th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron F, Gerstner Field, Louisiana, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
196th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron G, Gerstner Field, Louisiana, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
197th Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Love Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
198th Aero Squadron December 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Call Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
199th Aero Squadron 27 November 1917 AEF: 4 March 1918-May 1919
Trained as Service support squadron in England
Demobilized: June 1919[18]

200th to 249th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
200th Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Mather Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
201st Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Mather Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
202d Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Post Field, Oklahoma, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
203d Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Chanute Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
204th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
205th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Carlstrom Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
206th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Hicks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
207th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Barron Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
208th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron A, Benbrook Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
209th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Benbrook Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
212th Aero Squadron June 1918 Flying School service support squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5]
213th Aero Squadron 1 December 1917 AEF: February 1918-11 June 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Combat with 3d Pursuit Group
Demobilized 30 June 1919[5][22]
214th Aero Squadron December 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Park Field, Tennessee, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
215th Aero Squadron June 1918 Transferred from Rockwell Field, California
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, March Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
218th Aero Squadron January 1918 AEF: June 1918-June 1919
Re-designated: 4d Air Park
1st Pursuit Group
Aircraft/Vehicle maintenance and supply unit
Demobilized: July 1919[5]
221st Aero Squadron 16 December 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Scott Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
222d Aero Squadron 16 December 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918-June 1919
In training in England entire period
Demobilized: July 1919[5][23]
223d Aero Squadron 10 January 1918 AEF: 29 August 1918-June 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][7][23]
227th Aero Squadron 12 January 1918 AEF: 13 July 1918-June 1919
Service support squadron
7th Aviation Instruction Center
Clermont-Ferrand Aerodrome
Demobilzed: July 1919[5][23]
229th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Benbrook Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
232d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
233d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
234th Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron F, Brooks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
235th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron F, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
236th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Souther Field, Georgia, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
237th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Souther Field, Georgia, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
238th Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Kelly Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Payne Field, Mississippi, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
239th Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Kelly Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Payne Field, Mississippi, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
240th Aero Squadron May 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Dorr Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
241st Aero Squadron May 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Dorr Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
242d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Scott Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
243d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron G, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
244th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron H, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
245th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron I, Kelly Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
246th Aero Squadron July 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron L, Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
247th Aero Squadron 1 February 1918 AEF: 18 March 1918-March 1919
In training in England entire period
Demobilized: March 1919.[5][23]
248th Aero Squadron 1 February 1918 AEF: 18 March 1918-March 1919
In training in England entire period
Demobilized: April 1919 [5][23]
249th Aero Squadron November 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Rich Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]

250th to 299th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
250th Aero Squadron November 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron F, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
251st Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron F, Post Field, Oklahoma, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
252d Aero Squadron April 1918 Transferred from Ellington Field, Texas
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Payne Field, Mississippi, July 1918i
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
255th Aero Squadron February 1918 AEF: July 1918-June 1919
Re-designated: 3d Air Park
V Corps Balloon Group
Aircraft/Vehicle maintenance and supply unit
Demobilized: June 1919[5][21]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as Air Park No. 3, and assigned to the 2d Wing (Provisional), Langley Field, Virginia on 30 August 1921; Re-designated as the 58th Service Squadron on 16 January 1923; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with Air Park No. 3; Consolidated on 1 September 1936 with HHS, 8th Pursuit Group.[2]
  • Subsequent lineage and history undetermined.
257th Aero Squadron 14 February 1918 AEF: 12 June 1918-April 1919
Instructional flying squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: April 1919[5]
258th Aero Squadron 1 January 1918 AEF: 12 June 1918 – 1 August 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Demobilized 1 August 1919 [5]
259th Aero Squadron 14 February 1918 AEF: 31 July 1918-December 1918
In training in England entire period.
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
260th Aero Squadron 14 February 1918 AEF: 31 July 1918-December 1918
In training in England entire period.
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
261st Aero Squadron 7 February 1918 AEF: 31 July 1918-December 1918
In training in England entire period.
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
264th Aero Squadron 13 January 1918 AEF: 6 March 1918-December 1918
In training in England entire period.
Demobilized: December 1918 [5]
266th Aero Squadron 6 January 1918 AEF: 27 August 1918-December 1918
Service support squadron
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
267th Aero Squadron 26 January 1918 AEF: 5 August 1918- December 1918
In training in England entire period.
Demobilized: December 1918 [5]
269th Aero Squadron 26 January 1918 AEF: 5 August 1918-July 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][7]
270th Aero Squadron 8 February 1918 AEF: 26 August 1918-July 1918
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][7]
272d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
273d Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Barron Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
274th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Benbrook Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
275th Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Hicks Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
278th Aero Squadron 14 February 1918 AEF: 27 August 1918 – 13 June 1919
Corps Observation Squadron
Demobilized 13 June 1919 [5]
279th Aero Squadron February 1918 AEF: September 1918-March 1919
Re-designated: 5th Air Park
2d Pursuit Group
Aircraft/Vehicle maintenance and supply unit
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
281st Aero Squadron 8 February 1918 AEF: 26 August 1918-July 1918
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Air Park Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][7]
283d Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, Mather Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
284th Aero Squadron February 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Carlstrom Field, Florida, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
285th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron H, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
286th Aero Squadron March 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron T, Ellington Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
287th Aero Squadron April 1918 Service Squadron at Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, May, 1918. Transferred to Chanute Field, Illinois, June 1918 and re-designated "Squadron D", July 1918. Re-designated 287th Aero Squadron and transferred to Aviation General Supply Depot Americus, Georgia, December 1918[5]
  • Depot was established in March, 1918 as a general supply depot.[15] The 112th and 287th Aero Squadrons were consolidated into "Aviation Supply Depot Detachment" 1 January 1919.[5]
288th Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Chanute Field, Illinois, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
289th Aero Squadron June 1918 Transferred from Rockwell Field, California
Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron C, March Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
290th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron F, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
291st Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron G, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
292d Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron H, Rockwell Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
293d Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, March Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
294th Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron D, Mather Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]

300th to 324th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
302d Aero Squadron June 1918 Organized as the 302d Aero Squadron (Service) at Carlstrom Field, Florida
Re-designated, Squadron "F", Carlstrom Field
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 302d Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 302d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
303d Aero Squadron May 1918 Organized as the 303d Aero Squadron (Provisional) at Ellington Field, Texas
Re-designated 303d Aero Squadron (Service), June 1918; Squadron "K", Ellington Field, July 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New Jersey) as the 303th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Col. Charles A. Lindbergh, Air Corps Reserve, was attached to the squadron in June 1932 for summer training at Mitchel Field, New York; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 303d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated in August 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
306th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 306th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Greene, North Carolina
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Tennessee) as the 306th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 306th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 23 July 1939; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
307th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 307th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Greene, North Carolina
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Georgia) as the 307th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 307th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 27 August 1939; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
308th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 308th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Greene, North Carolina
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 308th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 308th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
309th Aero Squadron 7 July 1919 AEF: 11 August 1918- December 1918
Service support squadron
In training in England entire time
Demobilized: December 1918[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 309th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft. Squadron commander in the late 1920s was World War I ace Major H. Weir Cook; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 309th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
310th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 310th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Greene, North Carolina
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Michigan) as the 310th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 310th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
311th Aero Squadron June 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, March Field, California, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 311th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 311th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
312th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 312th Aero Squadron (Service) at Bolling Field, District of Columbia
Demobilized: September 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Alabama) as the 312th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 312th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
313th Aero Squadron June 1918 Organized as the 313th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
Demobilized: August 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Iowa) as the 313th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; 1st Lt. Charles Lindburgh was a member of the squadron from June to November 1925; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 313th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 2 October 1939; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
314th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 314th Aero Squadron (Service) at Aviation Concentration Center, Garden City, New York
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Nebraska) as the 314th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft. The squadron’s equipment was stationed at Offut Field, Nebraska; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 314th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 2 October 1939; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
315th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 315th Aero Squadron (Service) at Aviation Concentration Center, Garden City, New York
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Texas) as the 315th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 315th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
316th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 316th Aero Squadron (Service) at Aviation Concentration Center, Garden City, New York
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as the 316th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft. In January 1922 the squadron received the use of a hangar at Crissy Field and was issued five aircraft for training purposes making it the first aircraft equipped reserve squadron in the United States; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 316th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 1 September 1940; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
319th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 319th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Massachusetts) as the 319th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft. Stationed initially at the Framingham Airdrome. The squadron’s aircraft were transferred to the Boston Airport after its opening in 1923; Consolidated on 18 November 1936 with the 319th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
320th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 320th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Oklahoma) as the 320th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 320th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
321st Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 321st Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Oregon) as the 321st Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft. The squadron’s equipment was stationed just across the Columbia River at Pearson Field, Vancouver Barracks, WA. 1st Lt. Oakley Kelly, Air Service Reserve, a pilot who made the first non-stop transcontinental flight in 1923, was the unit instructor 1924-28; Consolidated on 12 August 1933 with the 321st Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 30 January 1942; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
322d Aero Squadron February 1918 Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: February 1919 [5][8]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New Hampshire) as the 322d Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with the 322d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
323d Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 323d Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
Demobilized: August 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 323d Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 323d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
324th Aero Squadron February 1918 Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919[5][8]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 324th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with the 324th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 23 October 1939 by relief of personnel; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]

325th to 349th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
325th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 325th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 869th Aero Squadron (Repair), April 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 325th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 19 November 1931 with the 325th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
327th Aero Squadron November 1917 Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Arkansas) as the 327th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with the 327th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 2 October 1939 by relief of personnel; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
328th Aero Squadron November 1917 Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Colorado) as the 328th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 21 November 1936 with the 328th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
329th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 329th Aero Squadron (Service) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Utah) as the 329th Observation Squadron on 24 June 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 329th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
332d Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 332d Aero Squadron (Supply) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated: 670th Aero Squadron (Supply), February 1918; assigned to Camp Morrison, Virginia
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as Air Park No. 332 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 332d Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 21 November 1936 with the 332d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
333d Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 333d Aero Squadron (Supply) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated: 671st Aero Squadron (Supply), February 1918; assigned to Camp Morrison, Virginia
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as Air Park No. 333 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 333d Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 21 November 1936 with the 333d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
335th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 335th Aero Squadron (Supply) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated: 673d Aero Squadron (Supply), February 1918; assigned to Camp Morrison, Virginia
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as Air Park No. 335 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 335th Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 21 November 1936 with the 335th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated about September 1939; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
336th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 336th Aero Squadron (Supply) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated: 674th Aero Squadron (Supply), February 1918; assigned to Camp Morrison, Virginia
Demobilized: December 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as Air Park No. 336 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 336th Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 21 November 1936 with the 336th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by March 1930; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
337th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 337th Aero Squadron (Supply) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated: 675th Aero Squadron (Supply), February 1918; assigned to Aviation General Supply Depot, San Antonio, Texas
Demobilized: April 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as Air Park No. 337 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 337th Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 21 November 1936 with the 339th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
338th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as the 338th Aero Squadron (Supply) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
AEF: July 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as Air Park No. 339 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 338th Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 339th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
341st Aero Squadron 7 July 1918 AEF: 30 July 1918-March 1919
Service support squadron
Aireal Gunnery School, St. Jean-de-monts Aerodrome
Demobilized: April 1919[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Texas) as Air Park No. 341 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 341st Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 341st Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 16 January 1941; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
342d Aero Squadron July 1917 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron M (later Q), Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
344th Aero Squadron September 1918 Organized as the 344th Aero Squadron (Service) at Aviation Concentration Center, Garden City, New York
Assigned to the Handley Page bomber project
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as Air Park No. 344 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 344th Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 344th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
346th Aero Squadron September 1918 Organized as the 346th Aero Squadron (Service) at Aviation Concentration Center, Garden City, New York
Assigned to the Handley Page bomber project
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as Air Park No. 346 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 346th Service Squadron, 2 July 1923; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 346th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
349th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 367th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
AEF:May 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as Air Park No. 349 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 349th Service Squadron, Transport Group, 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 349th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]

350th to 399th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
350th Aero Squadron 12 January 1918 AEF: 30 July 1918-December 1918
Service support squadron
In training in England entire time
Demobilized: December 1918[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Oklahoma) as the 350th Service Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 350th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
351st Aero Squadron 24 January 1918 AEF: 26 August 1918-April 1919
Service support squadron
4th Aerial Artillery Observation School, Camp de Coetquidan
Demobilized: April 1919[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Massachusetts) as the 351st Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 351st Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
353d Aero Squadron 14 January 1918 AEF: 26 August 1918- May 1919
Service support squadron
2d Aerial Artillery Observation School, Bordeaux
Demobilized: May 1919[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 353d Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 353d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
354th Aero Squadron 28 January 1918 AEF: 25 August 1918-July 1919
Corps Observation
Demobilized: 30 July 1919 [5][23]
357th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 357th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
Assigned to Hazelhurst Field, New York, March 1918-January 1919 Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Alabama) as the 357th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 357th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
358th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 358th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
Assigned to Roosevelt Field, New York, March 1918-January 1919 Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (South Carolina) as the 358th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 358th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
359th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 359th Aero Squadron (Service) at Kelly Field, Texas
Assigned to several stations in the United States, March 1918-January 1919 Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 359th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 November 1936 with the 359th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
360th Aero Squadron January 1918 AEF: June 1918-December 1918
Re-designated: 2d Air Park
3d Pursuit Group
Aircraft/Vehicle maintenance and supply unit
Demobilized: December 1918[5][21]
365th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 365th Aero Squadron (Depot) at Central Depot Headquarters, Chicago, Illinois; Re-designated 816th Aero Squadron (Depot), February 1918.
Demobilized: August 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Oklahoma) as the 365th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 365th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
366th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 366th Aero Squadron (Depot) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma; Re-designated 817th Aero Squadron (Depot), February 1918.
Demobilized: August 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Texas) as the 366th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 366th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
367th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 367th Aero Squadron (Depot) at Western Depot Headquarters, San Francisco, California; Re-designated 818th Aero Squadron (Depot), February 1918.
Demobilized: August 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as the 367th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 367th Aero Squadron; The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft.
  • Inactivated on 2 September 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
369th Aero Squadron 31 December 1917 AEF: 5 March 1918-June 1918
Service support squadron
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 369th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 374th Service Squadron, 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 27 November 1936
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
370th Aero Squadron 15 January 1918 AEF: 6 March 1918-June 1919
Aireal Observation Squadron (Training)
Second Corps Observation Aeronautical School, Chatillion-sur-Seine Aerodrome
Demobilized June 1919 [5][23]
372d Aero Squadron 17 January 1918 AEF: 18 March 1918-May 1919
Service support squadron
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][23]
373d Aero Squadron 19 January 1918 AEF: 18 March 1918- May 1919
Service support squadron
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as Air Park No. 373 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 373d Service Squadron, 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 373d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 2 March 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
374th Aero Squadron 28 December 1917 AEF: 18 March 1918- May 1919
Service support squadron
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919 [5][23]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as Air Park No. 374 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 374th Service Squadron, 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 374th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 1 September 1928; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
375th Aero Squadron 20 January 1918 AEF: 18 March 1918- May 1919
Service support squadron
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919 [5][23]
376th Aero Squadron 1 January 1918 AEF: 18 March 1918- May 1919
Service support squadron
3d Air Instructional Center, Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919 [5][23]
377th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 377th Aero Squadron (Service) at Rich Field, Waco, Texas
AEF: March 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Indiana) as Air Park No. 305 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated as the 377th Service Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 377th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 1 December 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
378th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 378th Aero Squadron (Service) at Rich Field, Waco, Texas
AEF: March 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as Air Park No. 306 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated as the 378th Service Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 378th Aero Squadron
    Inactivated by 7 December 1941; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
379th Aero Squadron April 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron E, Benbrook Field, Texas, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918 [5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Nebraska) as Air Park No. 307 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 379th Service Squadron, Attack Group, 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 379th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
380th Aero Squadron January 1918 Instructional flying squadron
Re-designated:Squadron B, Selfridge Field, Michigan, July 1918
Demobilized: November 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Texas) as Air Park No. 308 on 15 October 1921; Re-designated 380th Service Squadron, Observation Group, 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 380th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]

400th to 449th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
400th Aero Squadron 23 May 1917 Formed as 29th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 28 July 1917-July 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919
  • Notable as the first American Air Service Squadron to arrive in France[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 400th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 400th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
401st Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 401st Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 15th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 401st Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 401st Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 18 September 1930; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
402d Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 402d Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 16th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 402d Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 402d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 5 December 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
403d Aero Squadron November 1917 Re-designated 17th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 403d Airdrome Company
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
404th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 405th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 18th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 404th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 404th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by June 1940; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
405th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 405th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 19th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 405th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 405th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
406th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 406th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 20th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 406th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated 406th Attack Squadron on 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 406th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by June 1940; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
407th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 407th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 1st Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 407th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 407th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 25 July 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
408th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 408th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 2d Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 408th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 408th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
409th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 409th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 3d Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 409th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 409th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
410th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 412th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 4th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 410th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 410th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 23 July 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
411th Aero Squadron November 1917 Re-designated 5th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 411th Airdrome Company 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 411th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
412th Aero Squadron November 1917 Organized as the 412th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 6th Spruce Squadron, Aberdeen, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Mississippi) as the 412th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 412th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 19 September 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
413th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 413th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 42d Spruce Squadron and transferred to Aberdeen, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) 15 October 1921 as the 413th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 413th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
414th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 414th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 102d Spruce Squadron, Powers, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 414th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 28 November 1936 with the 414th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated about June 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
415th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 415th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 32d Spruce Squadron and transferred to Twin, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) 15 October 1921 as the 415th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 415th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
416th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 416th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 33d Spruce Squadron and transferred to Stillwater, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) 15 October 1921 as the 416th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 416th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
417th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 417th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 34th Spruce Squadron and transferred to Pysht, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Wisconsin) 15 October 1921 as the 417th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 417th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
418th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 418th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 35th Spruce Squadron and transferred to Arlington, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Arkansas) 15 October 1921 as the 418th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 418th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
419th Aero Squadron March 1918 Organized as 419th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 43d Spruce Squadron and transferred to Lindburg, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) 15 October 1921 as the 419th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 419th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
420th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 420th Aero Squadron (Construction), Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 44th Spruce Squadron and transferred to Hoquiam, Washington, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Kentucky) 15 October 1921 as the 420th Airdrome Company; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 420th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
421st Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 421st Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 45th Spruce Squadron, Carlisle, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 421st Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 2 December 1936 with the 421st Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
422d Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 422d Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 36th Spruce Squadron, Blyn, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Wisconsin) as the 422d Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 2 December 1936 with the 422d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
423d Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 423d Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 46th Spruce Squadron, Bay City, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 423d Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated 423d Attack Squadron on 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 2 December 1936 with the 423d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
424th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 424th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 66th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Blind Slough, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
425th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 425th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 29th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 425th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 425th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
426th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as the 426th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 30th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 426th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 426th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
427th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 427th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 47th Spruce Squadron, Raymond, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 426th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 27 November 1936 with the 426th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 28 July 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
428th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as the 428th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 67th Spruce Squadron, Seaside, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Michigan) as the 428th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 16 November 1936 with the 428th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
429th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 429th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 31st Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
430th Aero Squadron January1918 Organized as the 430th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 37th Spruce Squadron, Snoqualmie Falla, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Missouri) as the 430th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; This squadron was one of the few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft. Squadron personnel were largely pilots and ground support personnel employed by Trans-World Airways (TWA) at the Kansas City Municipal Airport. Participated in a “Fly By” in June 1932 for the Honorable Patrick J. Hurley, Secretary of War, at the grand opening of the Kansas City-St. Louis Waterway; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 430th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
433d Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 433d Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 68th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Olney, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
434th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 434th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 69th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Clatsop, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
435th Aero Squadron January1918 Organized as the 435th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 50th Spruce Squadron, Hoquiam, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Texas) as the 435th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 435th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
436th Aero Squadron January1918 Organized as the 436th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 51st Spruce Squadron, Coomopo1ils, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Colorado) as the 436th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 436th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
437th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 437th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 79th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Waldport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
439th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 439th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 7th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]<
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
440th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 440th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 8th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]<
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
441st Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 441st Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 9th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]<
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
442d Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 442d Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 10th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]<
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
443d Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 447th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 11th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Massachusetts) as the 443d Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 443d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 5 June 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
444th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 444th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 12th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]<
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
445th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 445th Aero Squadron at Camp Darrington, Washington
Re-designated 38th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
446th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 446th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 53d Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Enumclaw, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
447th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 447th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 70th Spruce Squadron, Miami, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 447th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 447th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated in June 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
448th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 448th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 54th Spruce Squadron, Raymond, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 448th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 448th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
449th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 449th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 55th Spruce Squadron, South Bend, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 449th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 449th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]

450th to 499th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
451st Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 451st Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 56th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Nemah, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
452d Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 452d Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 71st Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Seaside, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
453d Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 453d Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 80th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Toledo, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
454th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 454th Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 57th Spruce Squadron, July 1918 transferred to Raymond, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
455th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 455th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 81st Spruce Squadron, Waldport, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (North Carolina) as the 455th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated as the 455th Bombardment Squadron on 18 August 1933; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 455th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 19 September 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
456th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 456th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 72d Spruce Squadron, Clatsop, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Tennessee) as the 456th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 456th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
457th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 457th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 73d Spruce Squadron, Clatsop, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Georgia) as the 457th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 25 November 1936 with the 457th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
458th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as the 458th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 74th Spruce Squadron, Clatsop, Oregon, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Georgia) as the 458th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated as the 458th Bombardment Squadron on 18 August 1933; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 458th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
459th Aero Squadron March 1918 Organized as the 459th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Vancouver Barracks, Washington; Re-designated 58th Spruce Squadron, Aberdeen, Washington, July 1918
Transferred to Vancouver Barracks, November 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Tennessee) as the 459th Observation Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 459th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 19 September 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
460th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 460th Aero Squadron at Portland, Oregon
Re-designated 105th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
462d Aero Squadron 4 August 1917 Formed as 48th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-July 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: August 1919[5][24]
463d Aero Squadron 3 August 1917 Formed as 51st Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 30 October 1917-July 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][24]
464th Aero Squadron 7 August 1917 Formed as 52d Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-July 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the United States Army Air Corps as Air Park No. 4, and assigned to the 2d Bombardment Group, Kelly Field, Texas on 26 June 1922; Concurrently organized with personnel and equipment from the 464th Aero Squadron; Re-designated as the 59th Service Squadron on 25 January 1923
  • Demobilized on 1 September 1936.[2]
465th Aero Squadron 26 August 1917 Formed as 53d Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-March 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][24]
466th Aero Squadron 28 July 1917 Formed as 54th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-January 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: February 1919[5][24]
467th Aero Squadron 6 August 1917 Formed as 55th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-March 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][24]
468th Aero Squadron 8 August 1917 Formed as 56th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-June 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Air Service Acceptance Park No. 1
Orly Field, Paris
Demobilized: July 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 468th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 469th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
469th Aero Squadron 8 August 1917 Formed as 57th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 29 October 1917-March 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 469th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 469th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
470th Aero Squadron 9 August 1917 Formed as 58th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 5 February 1918-December 1918
Construction Squadron
Served at RAF Stations in England
Demobilized: December 1918[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 470th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 47th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
474th Aero Squadron 11 August 1917 Formed as 62d Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 24 March 1918-January 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: January 1919[5][24]
475th Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as 63d Aero Squadron (Construction), Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 475th Aero Squadron, February 1918
AEF: February 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as the 475th Attack Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 16 November 1936 with the 475th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
476th Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as 64th Aero Squadron (Construction), Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 476th Aero Squadron, February 1918
AEF: February 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as the 476th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Consolidated on 24 January 1931 with the 476th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
477th Aero Squadron 11 August 1917 Formed as 65th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 21 March 1918-January 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: January 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as the 477th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; >Consolidated on 24 January 1931 with the 477th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
479th Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as 67th Aero Squadron (Construction), Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 479th Aero Squadron, February 1918
AEF: February 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (California) as the 479th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Relocated on 28 January 1930 to the Los Angeles Municipal Airport, Los Angeles, CA. There the squadron became one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft.; Consolidated on 24 January 1931 with the 479th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 2 September 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
480th Aero Squadron 12 August 1917 Formed as 68th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 21 March 1918-February 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: February 1919[5][24]
481st Aero Squadron 12 August 1917 Formed as 69th Aero Squadron (Prov)
AEF: 21 March 1918-February 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: February 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 481st Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with the 483d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by June 1940; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
482d Aero Squadron 15 August 1917 Formed as 70th Aero Squadron
AEF: 26 March 1918 – 8 February 1919
Construction Squadron
Demobilized: 8 February 1919[3][5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Maryland) as the 482d Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 2 December 1936 with the 482d Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 23 July 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942
  • Reconstituted and consolidated (21 Apr 1944) with 482d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) which was constituted on 28 Feb 1944; Inactivated on 30 Jun 1946[2][3]
483d Aero Squadron 15 August 1917 Formed as 71st Aero Squadron
AEF: 21 March 1918-February 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: February 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 483d Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 2 December 1936 with the 483d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 23 July 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
484th Aero Squadron 15 August 1917 Formed as 72d Aero Squadron
AEF: 21 March 1918-January 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: February 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 484th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 2 December 1936 with the 484th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 12 May 1937 by relief of personnel; Disbanded on 31 May 1942
  • Reconstituted and consolidated (21 Apr 1944) with 484th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) which was constituted on 28 Feb 1944; Inactivated on 30 Jun 1946[2][3]
485th Aero Squadron 15 August 1917 Formed as 73d Aero Squadron
AEF: 21 March 1918-May 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: May 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 485th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 485th Aero Squadron; Inactivated by June 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942
  • Reconstituted and consolidated 28 February 1944 with the 485th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy); inactivated on 10 June 1946[2]
486th Aero Squadron 13 August 1917 Formed as 74th Aero Squadron
AEF: 21 March 1918-June 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: June 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Indiana) as the 486th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 486th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by March 1930; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
487th Aero Squadron 14 August 1917 Formed as 75th Aero Squadron
AEF: 25 December 1917-May 1919
Construction Squadron
2d Air Depot
Latrecey Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Kentucky) as the 487th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 487th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by March 1930; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
488th Aero Squadron 14 August 1917 Formed as 76th Aero Squadron
AEF: 25 December 1917-May 1919
Construction Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][24]
489th Aero Squadron 13 August 1917 Formed as 77th Aero Squadron
AEF: 1 January 1918 – 8 February 1919
Construction squadron in France
Demobilized: 6 March 1919
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Washington) as the 489th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924. The squadron was one of a few in the Organized Reserve that possessed facilities, equipment, and aircraft; Consolidated in June 1932 with the 489th Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 30 January 1942 by relief of personnel
  • Consolidated (1958) with 489th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) which was constituted on 10 August 1942; Discontinued, and inactivated on 1 January 1962[2][3]
  • Reactivated as the 489th Reconnaissance Squadron on August 26, 2011 at Beale Air Force Base, California
490th Aero Squadron 14 August 1917 Formed as 78th Aero Squadron
AEF: 7 December 1917- February 1919
Construction Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: February 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Washington) as the 490th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 490th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 2 March 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
491st Aero Squadron 14 August 1917 Formed as 79th Aero Squadron
AEF: 8 December 1917-January 1919
Construction Squadron
7th Aviation Instruction Center
Clermont-Ferrand Aerodrome
Demobilized: January 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Washington) as the 491st Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 491st Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 2 March 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942
  • Consolidated (1958) with 491st Bombardment Squadron (Medium) which was constituted on 14 August 1942; Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 June 1961[2][3]
492d Aero Squadron 15 August 1917 Formed as 80th Aero Squadron
AEF: 8 December 1917-
Construction Squadron
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: January 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Washington) as the 492d Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 5 December 1936 with the 492d Aero Squadron; Inactivated on 2 March 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942
  • Consolidated (1960) with 492d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) which was constituted on 19 September 1942; Discontinued, and inactivated on 1 February 1963[2][3]
493d Aero Squadron 10 July 1917 Formed as 45th Aero Squadron
AEF: 8 December 1917-January 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: January 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Wisconsin) as the 493d Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 493d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
494th Aero Squadron 17 August 1917 Formed as 82d Aero Squadron
AEF: 8 December 1917-May 1919
Construction Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][24]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Wisconsin) as the 494th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 494th Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
495th Aero Squadron August 1917 Organized as 83d Aero Squadron (Construction) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated February 1918 at Camp Morrison, Virginia
AEF: March 1918-January 1919
Demobilized in January 1919.[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Wisconsin) as the 495th Bombardment Squadron on 31 March 1924; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 495th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 1 December 1929; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
496th Aero Squadron 11 October 1917 Formed as 200th Aero Squadron
AEF: 20 November 1917-April 1919
Construction Squadron
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: April 1919[5][24]
497th Aero Squadron 11 October 1917 Formed as 201st Aero Squadron
AEF: 20 November 1917-April 199
Construction Squadron
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: April 1919[5][24]
498th Aero Squadron 15 December 1917 Formed as 202d Aero Squadron
AEF: 25 September 1918- January 1919
Construction Squadron
Constructed airfields for First Army
Demobilized: January 1919[5][24]
499th Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 Formed as 203d Aero Squadron
AEF: 4 November 1918-March 1919
Construction Squadron
Air Service Replacement Concentration Center
St. Maixent Replacement Barracks
Demobilized: March 1919[5][24]

500th to 799th Aero Squadrons[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
500th Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 Formed as 204th Aero Squadron
AEF: 9 November 1918-March 1919
Construction Squadron
Air Service Replacement Concentration Center
St. Maixent Replacement Barracks
Demobilized: March 1919[5][24]
501st Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 205th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
Re-designated February 1918; Transferred to several locations within Continental United States, March 1918-January 1919.
Demobilized in January 1919.[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 501st Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated as the 501st Transport Squadron on 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 501st Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by 7 December 1941; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
502d Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 206th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
Re-designated February 1918; Transferred to several locations within Continental United States, February 1918-January 1919.
Demobilized in January 1919.[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 502d Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated as the 502d Transport Squadron on 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 502d Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 23 July 1939; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
503d Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 207th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
Re-designated February 1918 at Dorr Field, Florida. Transferred to Aviation General Supply Depot, Middleton, Pennsylvania, September 1918
Demobilized in March 1919.[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Pennsylvania) as the 503d Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921; Reorganized and re-designated as the 503d Transport Squadron on 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 7 December 1936 with the 503d Aero Squadron
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
504th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 208th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Camp Morrison, Virginia
Re-designated February 1918. Transferred to several locations within Continental United States, February 1918-January 1919.
Demobilized in January 1919.[5]
505th Aero Squadron December 1917 Organized as 209th Aero Squadron (Construction) at Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated February 1918 at Rich Field, Texas. Transferred to several locations within Continental United States, May 1918-January 1919.
Demobilized in January 1919.[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Texas) as the 505th Pursuit Squadron on 15 October 1921;Reorganized and re-designated as the 505th Transport Squadron on 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 505th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 31 October 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
506th Aero Squadron July 1918 Organized as a construction squadron, Brooks Field, Texas
Demobilized, November 1918[5]
507th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as a construction squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred to Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, July 1918.
Demobilized, November 1918[5]
508th Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as a construction squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred to Gerstner Field, Louisiana, August 1918.
Demobilized, November 1918[5]
509th-600th Aero Squadrons Never organized[5]
601st Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as 601st Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 13th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
603d Aero Squadron February 1918 Organized as 603d Aero Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 14th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
607th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred January 1918 to Fort Wayne, Michigan
Demobilized: February 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Indiana) 1 October 1933 as the as the 607th Supply Squadron; Consolidated on 23 November 1936 with 607th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
608th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred August 1918 to Mitchell Field, New York
Demobilized: September 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) as the 608th Supply Squadron 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 8 December 1936 with 608th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
609th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred August 1918 to Mitchell Field, New York
Demobilized: September 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 609th Supply Squadron 1 October 1933; Consolidated on 8 December 1936 with 609th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
610th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred June 1918 to Aviation General Supply Depot, Middletown, Pennsylvania
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Georgia) 1 October 1933 as the 610th Supply Squadron; Consolidated on 8 December 1936 with 610th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
611th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred June 1918 to Langley Field, Virginia
Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Alabama) 1 October 1933 as the 611th Supply Squadron; Consolidated on 8 December 1936 with 611th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
612th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred July 1918 to Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) 1 October 1933 as the 612th Supply Squadron; Consolidated on 30 November 1937 with 612th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
613th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred August 1918 to Garden City, New York
Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) 1 October 1933 as the 613th Supply Squadron; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with 613th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
614th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred August 1918 to Garden City, New York
Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve 1 October 1933 as the 614th Supply Squadron; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with 614th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
615th Aero Squadron January 1918 Organized as a Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Transferred July 1918 to Souther Field, Georgia
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve 1 October 1933 as the 615th Supply Squadron.
    Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with 615th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
632d Aero Squadron 14 August 1917 Formed as 111th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron
Kelly Field, Texas
Demobilized: 19 August 1919
633d Aero Squadron 18 August 1917 Formed as 112th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron
Kelly Field, Texas
Demobilized: 19 August 1919
634th Aero Squadron 26 August 1917 Supply Squadron, Formed as 113th Aero Squadron, Re-designated February 1918.
Assigned to Aviation General Supply Depot, Middletown, Pennsylvania, September 1917.
Demobilized March 1919[5]
  • Depot was established in early 1917 as a general supply and ordnance depot. Also known as "Middletown Ordnance Depot"[15]
635th Aero Squadron August 1917 Supply Squadron, Formed as 114th Aero Squadron, Re-designated February 1918.
Assigned to Aviation General Supply Depot, Richmond, Virginia, September 1917.
Demobilized July 1919[5]
  • Depot was established in early 1917 as a general supply depot. Located on the site of the Virginia-Caroline Chemical Company[15]
636th Aero Squadron 28 August 1917 Formed as 115th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 636th Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 27 December 1917 – 11 May 1919
Supply Squadron
Demobilized: 8 April 1919[25]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 115th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of California; Organized in April 1924 at Hollywood, CA. Relocated on 16 June 1924 to Clover Field, Santa Monica, CA. Concurrently Federally recognized at Clover Field
  • Currently CA ANG 115th Airlift Squadron [5][10]
637th Aero Squadron 29 August 1917 Formed as 116th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 6379th Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 27 December 1917 – 25 March 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Supply Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: 20 May 1919 [7]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 116th Squadron (Observation), and allotted to the state of Washington; Organized on 24 July 1924 and Federally recognized on 6 August 1924 at Felts Field, Parkwater, WA; Consolidated on 20 October 1936 with the 116th Aero Squadron
  • Currently WA ANG 116th Air Refueling Squadron[3][5][10]
638th Aero Squadron 30 August 1917 Formed at 117th Aero Squadron
AEF: 31 December 1917-July 1919
Pursuit Squadron
Assigned to 5th Pursuit Group (Did not see combat)
Demobilized 31 July 1919 [5][25]
.
639th Aero Squadron 31 August 1917 Formed as 118th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 639th Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 3 January 1918 – 25 May 1919
Supply Squadron
Demobilized: 6 June 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 118th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Connecticut; Organized on 27 July 1923 and Federally recognized on 1 November 1923 at Brainard Field, Hartford, CT.
  • Currently CT ANG 118th Airlift Squadron [5][10]
640th Aero Squadron 1 September 1917 Formed as 121st Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 Jan 1918-April 1919
Supply Squadron
3d Air Instructional Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: April 1919[5][25]
641st Aero Squadron 2 September 1917 Formed as 122d Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 January 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
3d Air Instructional Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][25]
642d Aero Squadron 2 September 1917 Formed as 123d Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 January 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
3d Air Instructional Center<BRIssoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][25]
643d Aero Squadron 3 September 1917 Formed as 124th Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 January 1918-May 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Supply Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][7][25]
644th Aero Squadron 2 September 1917 Formed as 125th Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 January 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
3d Air Instructional Center<BRIssoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][25]
645th Aero Squadron 3 September 1917 Formed as 126th Aero Squadron
AEF: 28 January 1918-June 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Supply Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][7][25]
646th Aero Squadron 3 September 1917 Formed as 127th Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 January 1918-April 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Replacement Concentration Center
St. Maixent Replacement Barracks
Demobilized: April 1919[5][25]
648th Aero Squadron 5 September 1917 Formed as 129th Aero Squadron
AEF: 13 April 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
Split into three flights:
(A) 1st Day Bombardment Group
Amanty Airdrome
(B)First Army Observation Group
Vavincourt Aerodrome
(C) 1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919 [5][25]
649th Aero Squadron 5 September 1917 Formed as 130th Aero Squadron
AEF: 12 April 1918-June 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][25]
650th Aero Squadron 5 September 1917 Formed as 131st Aero Squadron
AEF: 13 April 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Acceptance Park No. 1
Orly Airport, Paris
Demobilized: May 1919[5][25]
652d Aero Squadron September 1917 Formed as the 133d Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 652d Aero Squadron (Supply) January 1918
Transferred to Garden City, New York January 1918
Transferred to AEF: Training in England entire time
Demobilized: December 1918[5][25]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) 1 October 1933 as the 652d Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with 652d Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
653d Aero Squadron September 1917 Formed as the 134th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 653d Aero Squadron (Supply) January 1918
Transferred to Camp Morrison, Virginia, January 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) 1 October 1933 as the 653d Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 3 December 1936 with 653d Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
654th Aero Squadron December 1917 Formed as the 146th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Garden City, New York
Re-designated 654th Aero Squadron (Supply) January 1918
Demobilized: January 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve 1 October 1933 as the 654th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 654th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
655th Aero Squadron 26 October 1917 Formed as 220th Aero Squadron
AEF: 30 January 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][25]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve 1 October 1933 as the 655th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 655th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
656th Aero Squadron 22 December 1917 Formed as 230th Aero Squadron
AEF: 28 January 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: May 1919[5][25]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Nebraska) 1 October 1933 as the 656th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 656th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
657th Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 Formed as 231st Aero Squadron
AEF: 24 February 1918-March 1919
Supply Squadron
Stationed at various RAF stations in England
Demobilized: March 1919[5][25]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Indiana) 1 October 1933 as the 657th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 657th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
658th Aero Squadron 23 December 1917 Formed as 232d Aero Squadron
AEF: 25 February 1918- May 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Acceptance Park No. 1
Orly Airport, Paris
Demobilized: May 1919[5][25]
659th Aero Squadron 22 December 1917 Formed as 233d Aero Squadron
AEF: 13 April 1918-July 1919
Advance Section, Services of Supply (SOS) Supply Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][7][25]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) 1 October 1933 as the 659th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 659th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
660th Aero Squadron 19 December 1917 Formed as 234th Aero Squadron
AEF: 17 May 1918-May 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Acceptance Park No. 1
Orly Airport, Paris
Demobilized: June 1919[5][25]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Alabama) 1 October 1933 as the 660th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 660th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
661st Aero Squadron December 1917 Formed as the 235th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Aviation General Supply Depot, Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 661st Aero Squadron (Supply) February 1918
Deployed to AEF May 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New Jersey) 1 October 1933 as the 661st Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 661st Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
662d Aero Squadron December 1917 Formed as the 236th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Aviation General Supply Depot, Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 662d Aero Squadron (Supply) February 1918
Demobilized: April 1919[5][8]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New York) 1 October 1933 as the 662d Repair Squadron; >Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 662d Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
663d Aero Squadron December 1917 Formed as the 237th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Re-designated 662d Aero Squadron (Supply) February 1918
Deployed to AEF May 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Louisiana) 1 October 1933 as the 663d Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 663d Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
665th Aero Squadron December 1917 Formed as 239th Aero Squadron
Supply Squadron, Kelly Field, Texas
Deployed to AEF May 1918-December 1918
Demobilized: December 1918[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve 1 October 1933 as the 665th Repair Squadron; Consolidated on 4 December 1936 with 665th Aero Squadron
  • Never activated; Disbanded 31 May 1942[2]
675th Aero Squadron September 1917 Formed as: 337th Aero Squadron
Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: April 1919 [5][8]
.
667th Aero Squadron 23 December 1917 Formed as 241st Aero Squadron
AEF: 13 April 1918-June 1919
Supply Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][25]
672d Aero Squadron 24 December 1917 Formed as 338th Aero Squadron
AEF: 15 August 1918—December 1918
Supply Squadron
Training in England entire time
Demobilized: December 1918[5][25]
.
681st Aero Squadron April 1918 Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
.
684th Aero Squadron October 1918 Aviation General Supply Depot squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
.
686th to 799th Aero Squadrons Never organized[5]

800th Aero Squadron and above[edit]

Aero Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
800th Aero Squadron 27 August 1917 Formed as 106th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 800th Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 2 January 1918 – 28 April 1919
Repair Squadron
Demobilized: 2 July 1919 [26]
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 135th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Alabama.
  • Organized and Federally recognized as the 135th Squadron (Observation) on 21 January 1922 with personnel from the “Birmingham Escadrille” (a civilian flying club organized in 1919 by World War I ace Maj. James A. Meissner) and Federally recognized at Roberts Field, Birmingham, AL; Consolidated on 20 October 1936 with the 106th (800th) Aero Squadron
  • Currently AL ANG 106th Air Refueling Squadron[3][5]
801st Aero Squadron 27 August 1917 Formed as 107th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 801st Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 2 January 1918 – 8 March 1919
Repair Squadron
Demobilized: 18 March 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 107th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Michigan; Organized and Federally recognized on 7 May 1926 at Detroit, MI.
  • Currently MI ANG 107th Fighter Squadron [5][10]
802d Aero Squadron 27 August 1917 Formed as 108th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 802d Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 2 January 1918 – 27 May 1919
Repair Squadron
Demobilized: 11 June 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 108th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Illinois; Organized and Federally recognized on 1 July 1927 at the Municipal Airport, Chicago, IL.
  • Currently IL ANG 108th Air Refueling Squadron [5][10]
803d Aero Squadron 27 August 1917 Formed as 109th Aero Squadron
Re-designated: 803d Aero Squadron 1 July 1918
AEF: 2 January 1918 – 13 June 1919
Repair Squadron
Demobilized: 23 June 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 109th Squadron (Observation) and allotted to the state of Minnesota; Organized on 21 November 1921 by re-designation of the Observation Squadron, Minnesota National Guard (organized in July 1920 and Federally recognized on 17 January 1921 at Holman Municipal Airport in St. Paul, MN).
  • Currently MN ANG 109th Airlift Squadron [5][10]
804th Aero Squadron 27 August 1917 Formed as 110th Aero Squadron
Repair Squadron
Squadron K, Kelly Field, Texas
Demobilized: 18 November 1918
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 110th Squadron (Observation), and allotted to the state of Missouri
  • Organized and Federally recognized on 23 June 1923 at Anglum Field, St. Louis, MO.; 1st Lt. Charles Lindburgh was a member of the squadron 1925-27; Consolidated on 20 October 1936 with the 109th (804th) Aero Squadron
  • Currently MO ANG 110th Bomb Squadron[3][5][10]
805th Aero Squadron 23 November 1917 Formed as: 244th Aero Squadron
AEF: 15 January 1918-June 1919
Repair Squadron
Demobilized: June 1919 [5][26]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Oregon) on 31 March 1924 as the 805th Observation Squadron; Consolidated on 8 December 1936 with the 805th Aero Squadron
    Mission was to provide aerial observation support to the Commanding General, Ninth Corps Area.
  • Inactivated on 11 June 1937; Disbanded on 31 May 1942[2]
806th Aero Squadron November 1917 Formed as: 245th Aero Squadron
AEF: February 1918-December 1918
Repair Squadron
Demobilized: December 1918 [5][26]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (New Jersey) on 31 March 1924 as the 806th Headquarters Squadron; Consolidated on 8 December 1936 with the 806th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated on 3 November 1936; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
819th Aero Squadron January 1918 Aviation repair squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
820th Aero Squadron January 1918 Aviation repair squadron
Kelly Field, Texas. Demobilized: August 1919 [5][8]
822d Aero Squadron April 1918 AEF: April 1918-July 1919
Re-designated: 6th Air Park
4th Pursuit Group
Aircraft/Vehicle maintenance and supply unit
Demobilized: July 1919[5][21]
  • Constituted in the Army Air Service as Air Park No. 6, and assigned to the 9th Observation Group, Mitchel Field, New York on 30 August 1921; Re-designated as the 61st Service Squadron on 25 January 1923; Consolidated on 8 April 1924 with the 6th Air Park; Consolidated on 1 September 1936 with HHS, 9th Bombardment Group
  • Disbanded on 20 April 1944.[2]
825th Aero Squadron 28 January 1918 AEF: 1 September 1918-November1918
Repair Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: December 1918[5][26]
826th Aero Squadron 1 February 1918 AEF: 16 May 1918-September 1919
Repair Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: September 1919 [5][26]
827th Aero Squadron 11 February 1918 AEF: 18 May 1918-June 1919
Repair Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919 [5][26]
828th Aero Squadron 11 February 1918 AEF: September 1918-September 1919
Repair Squadron
2d Air Depot
Latrecey Aerodrome
Demobilized: September 1919 [5][26]
829th Aero Squadron 11 February 1918 AEF: 31 August 1918-September 1919
Repair Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: September 1919 [5][26]
830th Aero Squadron 11 February 1918 AEF: 15 September 1918-September 1919
Repair Squadron
2d Air Depot
Latrecey Aerodrome
Demobilized: September 1919 [5][26]
835th Aero Squadron 1 February 1918 AEF: 28 April 1918-March 1919
Repair Squadron
3d Air Depot
Courban Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][26]
837th Aero Squadron 1 February 1918 AEF: 14 May 1918-March 1919
Repair Squadron
Various RAF Stations in England
Demobilized: March 1919 [5][26]
840th Aero Squadron 1 February 1918 AEF: 4 May 1918 – 4 March 1919
Repair Squadron
2d Air Depot
Latrecey Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919
  • Constituted in the National Guard in 1921 as the 128th Observation Squadron and allotted to the state of Georgia; Reconstituted and consolidated (1944) with 128th Observation Squadron; Organized and Federally recognized on 1 May 1941
  • Currently GA ANG 128th Airborne Command and Control Squadron[3][5][10]
864th Aero Squadron March 1918 Organized at Air Service Mechanics School, St. Paul Minnesota as a Repair Squadron
Assigned to the Air Service Mechanics School
Demobilized in November 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Ohio) as the 864th Observation Squadron on 20 December 1928; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 864th Aero Squadron
  • Inactivated by June 1937 at Akron by relief of personnel; Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
865th Aero Squadron March 1918 Organized at Love Field, Texas as a Repair Squadron
Assigned to the Aviation Repair Depot, Dallas, Texas
Demobilized in March 1919[5]
  • Constituted in the Organized Reserve (Illinois) as the 865th Observation Squadron on 20 December 1928; Consolidated on 30 November 1936 with the 865th Aero Squadron; Typically conducted Inactive Training Period meetings at the Municipal Airport in Chicago
  • Disbanded on 31 May 1942 [2]
875th Aero Squadron 1 July 1918 AEF: 1 July 1918-June 1919
Organized in France
Repair Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Airdrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][26]
876th Aero Squadron Never Organized[5]
877th Aero Squadron June 1918 Repair Squadron, Aviation Repair Depot Dallas, Texas
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
  • Opened in September 1917, the Depot was attached to Love Field to repair wrecked aircraft and overhaul aircraft engines, closed March 1921[15]
878th Aero Squadron June 1918 Repair Squadron, Aviation Repair Depot Dallas, Texas
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
879th Aero Squadron June 1918 Repair Squadron, Aviation Repair Depot #3, Montgomery, Alabama
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
  • Depot was established in January, 1918 to repair wrecked aircraft and overhaul aircraft engines. Closed in March 1919[15]
880th Aero Squadron June 1918 Repair Squadron, Aviation Repair Depot #3, Montgomery, Alabama
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
881st Aero Squadron July 1918 Repair Squadron, McCook Field, Ohio
Re-designated "Squadron B", July 1918
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
882d Aero Squadron June 1918 Repair Squadron, Aviation Repair Depot #3, Montgomery, Alabama
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
883d Aero Squadron June 1918 Repair Squadron, Aviation Repair Depot #3, Montgomery, Alabama
Demobilized: March 1919[5]
884th to 1098th Aero Squadrons Never Organized[5]
1099th Aero Squadron 20 May 1918 AEF: 20 May 1918-March 1919
Organized in England
Repair Squadron
3d Air Depot
Courban Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919[5][26]
1100th Aero Squadron Never Organized[5]
1101st Aero Squadron 13 April 1918 AEF: 13 April 1918-February 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Airdrome
Demobilized: March 1919 [5][26]
1102d Aero Squadron 12 May 1918 AEF: 12 May 1918-February 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
1st Air Depot
Colombey-les-Belles Airdrome
Demobilized: March 1919 [5][26]
1103d Aero Squadron 9 May 1918 AEF: 9 May 1918-February 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
2d Aviation Instruction Center
Tours Aerodrome
Demobilized: March 1919 [5][26]
1104th Aero Squadron 22 May 1918 AEF: 22 May 1918-June 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
3d Aviation Instruction Center
Issoudun Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919 [5][26]
1105th Aero Squadron 26 May 1918 AEF: 26 May 1918-July 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
7th Aviation Instruction Center
Clermont-Ferrand Aerodrome
Demobilized: July 1919[5][26]
1106th Aero Squadron 1 June 1918 AEF: 1 June 1918-September 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: September 1919[5][26]
1107th Aero Squadron 27 July 1918 AEF: 27 July 1918-July 1919
Organized in England
Air Service Replacement Squadron
Various RAF Stations in England
Demobilized in England: July 1919[5][26]
1108th Aero Squadron 15 August 1918 AEF: 15 August 1918-May 1919
Organized in France
Air Service Replacement Squadron
Air Service Production Center No. 2.
Romorantin Aerodrome
Demobilized: June 1919[5][26]
1109th Aero Squadron Never Organized[5]
1110th Aero Squadron August 1918 AEF: Organized and demobilized overseas troops
Demobilized December 1918[5]
1111th Aero Squadron 5 October 1918 AEF: 5 October 1918-September 1919
Organized in Italy
Air Service Replacement Squadron
8th Aviation Instruction Center
Turin, Italy
Demobilized: September 1919 [5][26]

Provisional squadrons, Spruce Production Division[edit]

Squadron Established World War I Notes/Subsequent History
1st Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 1st Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 21st Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
2d Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 2d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 22d Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
3d Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 3d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 23d Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
4th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 1st Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 24th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
5th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 5th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 25th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
6th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 6th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 26th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
7th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 7th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 59th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Raymond, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
8th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 8th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 75th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Clatsop, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
9th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 9th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 60th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Hoquiam, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
11th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 11th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 76th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Astoria, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
12th Prov. Squadron March 1918 Organized as 12th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 76th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Bridal Veil, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
13th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 13th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 77th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Clatsop, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
14th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 14th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 78th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Astoria, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
15th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 15th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 61st Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Nemah, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
16th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 16th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 82d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Yaquina, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
17th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 17th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 62d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Elma, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
18th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 18th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 83d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
19th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 19th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 63d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Bay City, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
20th Prov. Squadron April 1918 Organized as 20th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 84th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Waldport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
21st Prov. Squadron May 1918 Organized as 21st Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 85th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Waldport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
22d Prov. Squadron May 1918 Organized as 22d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 86th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
23d Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 23d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 106th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
24th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 24th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 87th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
25th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 25th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 88th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
26th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 26th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 89th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Waldport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
27th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 27th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 90th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Newport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
28th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 28th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 91st Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Yaquina, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
29th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 29th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 92d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Agate Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
30th Prov. Squadron June 1918 Organized as 30th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 93d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Newport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
31st Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 31st Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 27th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
32d Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 32d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 28th Spruce Squadron, July 1918[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
33d Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 32d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 94th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
34th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 34th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 95th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Waldport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
35th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 35th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 103d Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Coquille, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
36th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 36th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 96th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
37th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 37th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 97th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Newport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
38th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 38th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 98th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Newport, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
39th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 39th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 99th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
40th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 40th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 100th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to South Beach, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
41st Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 41st Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 40th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Joyce, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
42d Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 42d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 101st Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Toledo, Oregon[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
43d Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 43d Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 41st Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Joyce, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
44th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 44th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 64th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Aberdeen, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
45th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 45th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 65th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Raymond, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
46th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 46th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 107th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Cosmopolis, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]
47th Prov. Squadron July 1918 Organized as 47th Provisional Squadron at Vancouver Barracks, Washington
Re-designated 108th Spruce Squadron, July 1918, transferred to Humptulips, Washington[5]
  • Assigned to Spruce Production Division; Demobilized: January 1919[5]

See also[edit]

Years in aviation: 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s
Years: 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ a b c d e f g USAF Historical Studies: No. 98, The United States Army Air Arm, April 1861 to April 1917 USAF Historical Division, Research Studies Institute Air University, May 1958
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq fr fs ft fu fv fw fx fy fz ga gb gc gd ge gf gg gh gi gj gk gl gm gn go gp gq gr gs gt gu gv gw gx gy gz ha hb hc hd he hf hg hh hi hj hk Clay, Lt.Col. Steven E. (2010). US Army Order of Battle 1919-1941 Vol. 3: The Services: Air Service, Engineers, and Special Troops Organizations. Command and General Staff College, Kansas: Combat Studies Institute Press. ISBN 978-0-9841901-4-0. Retrieved 2011-09-20. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb Maurer, Maurer. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force: World War II. Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Office of Air Force History, 1982.
  4. ^ Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 2, 9th and 10th Aero Squadrons
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq fr fs ft fu fv fw fx fy fz ga gb gc gd ge gf gg gh gi gj gk gl gm gn go gp gq gr gs gt gu gv gw gx gy gz ha hb hc hd he hf hg hh hi hj hk hl hm hn ho hp hq hr hs ht hu hv hw hx hy hz ia ib ic id ie if ig ih ii ij ik il im in io ip iq ir is it iu iv iw ix iy iz ja jb jc jd je jf jg jh ji jj jk jl jm jn jo jp jq jr js jt ju jv jw jx jy jz ka kb kc kd ke kf kg kh ki kj kk kl km kn ko kp kq kr ks kt ku kv kw kx ky kz la lb lc ld le lf lg lh li lj lk ll lm ln lo lp lq lr ls lt lu lv lw lx ly lz ma mb mc md me mf mg mh mi mj mk ml mm mn mo mp mq mr ms mt mu mv mw mx my mz na nb nc nd ne nf ng nh ni nj nk nl nm nn no np nq nr ns nt nu nv nw nx ny nz oa ob oc od oe of og oh oi oj ok ol om on oo op oq or os ot ou ov ow ox oy oz pa pb pc pd pe pf pg ph pi pj pk pl pm pn po pp pq pr ps pt pu pv pw px py pz qa qb qc qd qe qf qg qh qi qj qk ql qm qn qo qp qq qr qs qt qu qv qw qx qy qz ra rb rc rd re rf rg rh ri rj rk rl rm rn ro rp rq rr rs rt ru rv rw rx ry rz sa sb sc sd se sf sg sh si sj sk sl sm sn so sp sq sr ss st su sv sw sx sy sz ta tb tc td te tf tg th ti tj tk tl tm tn to tp tq tr ts tt tu tv tw tx ty tz ua ub uc ud ue uf ug uh ui uj uk ul um un uo up uq ur us ut uu uv uw ux uy uz va vb vc vd ve vf vg vh Order of Battle of the United States Land Forces in the First World War, Volume 3, Part 3, Center of Military History, United States Army, 1949 (1988 Reprint)
  6. ^ AFHRA 42d Attack Squadron lineage and history
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Series "N", Volume 16, Gorrell's History of the Air Service and Special Aviation Maps AND Station Lists for Air Service Units, Oct-Dec 1918
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m H. D. Kroll (editor), Kelly Field in the Great World War, 2d edition, 1919
  9. ^ a b c d e Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 15, 97th-102d Aero Squadrons
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Rosenfeld, Susan and Gross, Charles J (2007), Air National Guard at 60: A History. Air National Guard history program AFD-080527-040
  11. ^ AFHRA 94th Fighter Squadron lineage and history
  12. ^ Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 16, 103d Aero Squadron
  13. ^ AFHRA 13th Bomb Squadron lineage and history
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 17, 104th, 105th, 120th, 135th, 137th-139th, 141st, and 142d Aero Squadrons
  15. ^ a b c d e f Robert Swanson, Domestic United States Military Facilities of the First World War 1917-1919
  16. ^ AFHRA lineage and history 17th Weapons Squadron
  17. ^ Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 19, 148th Aero Squadron
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 20, 149th, 151st-155th, 157th-159th, 161st-163d, 165th, 166th, 171st-174th, 176th, 182d, 184th-186th, 188th, and 199th
  19. ^ National Archives copy of "HISTORY OF 156th AERO SQUADRON" provided by Commanding Officer, 1st. Lieut. Joseph H. McCandless at muster out
  20. ^ 49th Test and Evaluation Squadron AFHRA lineage and history
  21. ^ a b c d United States War Department (1920), Battle Participation of Organizations of the American Expeditionary Forces in France, Belgium and Italy, 1917–1919, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1920
  22. ^ Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 21, 213th Aero Squadron
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 22, 222d, 223d, 227th, 247th, 248th, 257th-261st, 264th, 266th, 267th, 269th, 270th, 278th, 281st, 309th, 334th, 338th, 341st, 350th, 351st, 353d, 354th, 369th, 370th, and 372d-376th Aero Squadrons
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 23, 400th, 462d-470th, 474th, and 480th-500th Aero Squadrons
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 24, 636th-646th, 648th-650th, 655th-660th, and 667th Aero Squadrons
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Gorrell's History of the American Expeditionary Forces Air Service, 1917-1919, Volume 25, 800th-803d, 805th, 806th, 825th-830th, 835th, 837th, 875th, 1099th, 1101st-1108th, and 1111th Aero Squadrons

External links[edit]