List of American Whig–Cliosophic Society people

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The Cliosophic Society, 1889.

This list of notable people associated with the American Whig–Cliosophic Society is made up of former students. Individuals are sorted by category and alphabetized within each category.

Politics and government[edit]

Name Known for Affiliation
Alito, SamuelSamuel Alito 110th Supreme Court Justice. unknown, Class of 1972. President of the Whig-Clio Debate Panel.[1]
Beatty, JohnJohn Beatty Revolutionary War veteran, Speaker of the New Jersey General Assembly. Whig (founder), class of 1769. Founded the American Whig Society.[2]
Brackenridge, Hugh HenryHugh Henry Brackenridge Coauthored the first American novel while at Princeton. Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice. Whig (founder), Class of 1771. Founded the American Whig Society.[3]
Bradford, WilliamWilliam Bradford Argued the first recorded case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Second Attorney General of the United States under George Washington. Whig (founder), Class of 1772. Founded the American Whig Society.[4]
Buchanan, JamesJames Buchanan Senator, Secretary of State, Fifteenth President of the United States. Whig (honorary), inducted 1820.[5]
Burr, AaronAaron Burr Revolutionary War veteran, New York Senator, third Vice-President of the United States. Clio (founder), Class of 1772. Founded the Cliosophic Society.[4]
Cruz, TedTed Cruz Senator, Texas Clio, Class of 1992.
Dallas, George M.George M. Dallas Senator from Pennsylvania, eleventh Vice-President of the United States. Clio, Class of 1810.[6]
Daniels, MitchMitch Daniels Forty-ninth Governor of Indiana. unknown, Class of 1971.[7]
Dulles, Allen WelshAllen Welsh Dulles Diplomat, second Director of the Council on Foreign Relations, first civilian CIA Director. Whig, Class of 1914.[8]
Dulles, John FosterJohn Foster Dulles As Secretary of State, one of the most famous diplomats of the 20th century. Whig, Class of 1908.[9][10]
Ellsworth, OliverOliver Ellsworth Founding Father, drafter of the Constitution, drafter of the Judiciary Act of 1789, third Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Clio (founder), Class of 1766. Founded the Cliosophic Society.[4]
Everett, EdwardEdward Everett U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, the fifteenth Governor of Massachusetts, Minister to Great Britain, and United States Secretary of State. Clio (honorary), inducted 1836.[5]
Henry, JohnJohn Henry Senator, eighth Governor of Maryland. Whig (founder), class of 1769. Founded the American Whig Society.[11]
Jackson, AndrewAndrew Jackson Seventh President of the United States. Whig (honorary), inducted 1838.[5]
Kean, ThomasThomas Kean Speaker of the New Jersey Assembly, forty-eighth Governor of New Jersey, chaired the 9/11 Commission. unknown (presumed Clio), Class of 1957.[12]
Lee, Light-Horse HarryLight-Horse Harry Lee Revolutionary War veteran, ninth Governor of Virginia, orator at George Washington’s funeral. Father of Robert E. Lee. Whig (originally Clio), Class of 1773.[13]
Livingston, Henry BrockholstHenry Brockholst Livingston Revolutionary War veteran, associate Supreme Court justice. Whig, Class of 1774.[14]
Madison, JamesJames Madison Federalist Papers author, Father of the Constitution, fourth President of the United States. Whig (founder), Class of 1771. Founded the American Whig Society.
Martin, LutherLuther Martin Founding Father, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, prominent Anti-Federalist. Clio (founder), Class of 1766. Founded the Cliosophic Society.[15]
Monroe, JamesJames Monroe Founding Father, Secretary of State, Secretary of War, Fifth President of the United States. Clio (honorary), inducted 1817.[5]
Nader, RalphRalph Nader Political activist, presidential candidate. unknown, Class of 1955.[16]
Ogden, AaronAaron Ogden United States senator, fifth governor of New Jersey. Clio, Class of 1773.[14]
Paterson, WilliamWilliam Paterson Founding Father, signer of the Constitution, second governor of New Jersey, Supreme Court Justice. Clio (founder), Class of 1763. Founded the Cliosophic Society.[4]
Pell, ClaiborneClaiborne Pell Senator (longest-serving senator in Rhode Island’s history), author of the Federal Pell Grant program. unknown (presumed Whig), class of 1940.[17]
Sarbanes, Paul S.Paul S. Sarbanes Senator (longest-serving senator in Maryland’s history), co-sponsor of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act. unknown, Class of 1954.[18]
Stevenson II, AdlaiAdlai Stevenson II Thirty-first governor of Illinois, fifth Ambassador to the United Nations (during the Cuban Missile Crisis), two-time presidential candidate. Whig, Class of 1922.[19]
Thomas, Norman M.Norman M. Thomas Pacifist, six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America. Whig, Class of 1905.[20]
Wilson, WoodrowWoodrow Wilson Professor, thirteenth President of Princeton, thirty-fourth Governor of New Jersey, twenty-eighth President of the United States. Wilson delivered his famous speech, “Princeton in the Nation’s Service,” as a representative of the American Whig Society.[21] Whig (Speaker), Class of 1879. Speaker (president) of the American Whig Society, contributor to the Nassau Literary Magazine. Later, as a professor, coached the Whig-Clio debate team.[15][22]
Wirt, WilliamWilliam Wirt Ninth Attorney General (longest serving in American history), arguing in Gibbons v. Ogden, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Worcester v. Georgia. Clio (honorary), inducted 1819.[5]

Academia[edit]

Name Known for Affiliation
Day, JeremiahJeremiah Day Fifth President of Yale University. Clio (honorary), inducted 1817.[5]
Nott, EliphaletEliphalet Nott Fourth President of Union College. Clio (honorary), inducted 1816.[5]
Nye, Jr., Joseph S.Joseph S. Nye, Jr. One of the most influential international relations scholars of the 20th century (pioneered the concept of soft power). unknown, Class of 1958.[23]
Rawls, JohnJohn Rawls One of the most influential political philosopher of the 20th century. unknown, class of 1943. First treasurer of Whig-Clio’s Madison Debating Society.[24]
Reeve, TappingTapping Reeve Founder of the first law school in the United States. Clio (founder), Class of 1763. Founded the Cliosophic Society.[25]
Smith, Samuel StanhopeSamuel Stanhope Smith Philosopher, seventh President of Princeton University. Whig (founder), class of 1769. Founded the American Whig Society.[26]
Wilson, WoodrowWoodrow Wilson Professor, thirteenth President of Princeton, thirty-fourth Governor of New Jersey, twenty-eighth President of the United States. Wilson delivered his famous speech, “Princeton in the Nation’s Service,” as a representative of the American Whig Society.[21] Whig (Speaker), Class of 1879. Speaker (president) of the American Whig Society, contributor to the Nassau Literary Magazine. Later, as a professor, coached the Whig-Clio debate team.[15][22]

Literature and Journalism[edit]

Name Known for Affiliation
Brackenridge, Hugh HenryHugh Henry Brackenridge Coauthored the first American novel while at Princeton. Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice. Whig (founder), Class of 1771. Founded the American Whig Society.[3]
Fitzgerald, F. ScottF. Scott Fitzgerald One of the most famous American authors of the 20th century. Whig, Class of 1917. Contributor to the Nassau Literary Magazine.[27][28]
Freneau, PhilipPhilip Freneau Coauthored the first American novel while at Princeton. The Poet of the American Revolution. Whig (founder), Class of 1771. Founded the American Whig Society.[4]
Ponnuru, RameshRamesh Ponnuru Senior editor for the National Review. Unknown, Class of 1995[29]
Tarkington, BoothBooth Tarkington One of only three novelists to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once. unknown, Class of 1893. Contributor to the Nassau Literary Magazine.[30]
Twain, MarkMark Twain One of the most influential American authors of the 19th century. Clio (honorary), inducted 1901.[31]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/2005/10/28/13656/
  2. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19250223-01.2.14&srpos=9&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-beatty
  3. ^ a b http://etcweb.princeton.edu/CampusWWW/Companion/brackenridge_hugh_henry.html
  4. ^ a b c d e http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19870727-01.2.95&srpos=1&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-----#
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Thomas Spencer Harding (1971). College literary societies: their contribution to higher education in the United States, 1815-1876. Pageant Press International. p. 39. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  6. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19750725-01.2.174&srpos=7&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-dallas----#
  7. ^ http://whigclio.princeton.edu/notable-alumni/
  8. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19110331-01.2.26&srpos=16&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-----#
  9. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19050502-01.2.4&srpos=13&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-
  10. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19050519-01.2.7&srpos=14&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-
  11. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19250223-01.2.14&srpos=9&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-henry
  12. ^ Alvin S. Felzenberg (12 May 2006). Governor Tom Kean: From the New Jersey Statehouse to the 9-11 Commission. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 978-0-8135-3799-3. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  13. ^ http://etcweb.princeton.edu/CampusWWW/Companion/lee_henry.html
  14. ^ a b http://www.nytimes.com/1865/06/29/news/culpable-carelessness-commencement-princeton-centennial-cliosophic-society.html?pagewanted=2
  15. ^ a b c http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19670615-01.2.81&srpos=2&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-----#
  16. ^ Nancy Bowen (1 April 2002). Ralph Nader: Man With a Mission. Millbrook Press. p. 26. ISBN 978-0-7613-2365-5. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  17. ^ http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/2009/01/07/22465/
  18. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19520514-01.2.10&srpos=1&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-sarbanes----
  19. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19750725-01.2.174&srpos=7&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-stevenson----#
  20. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19750725-01.2.174&srpos=7&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-thomas----#
  21. ^ a b http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian18961022-02.2.2&srpos=8&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-wilson----
  22. ^ a b http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00335633009360910
  23. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19580107-01.2.11&srpos=592&e=-------en-20--581-byDA-txt-IN-%22%22-ARTICLE#
  24. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19400412-01.2.3&srpos=2&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-rawls----#
  25. ^ http://findingaids.princeton.edu/getEad?eadid=AC016&kw
  26. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19291211-01.2.4&srpos=2&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-#
  27. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19131015-01.2.7&srpos=5&e=-------en-20--1-byDA-txt-IN-fitzgerald
  28. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19670615-01.2.81&srpos=2&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-
  29. ^ http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/2006/10/11/16144/
  30. ^ http://theprince.princeton.edu/princetonperiodicals/cgi-bin/princetonperiodicals?a=d&d=Princetonian19670615-01.2.81&srpos=2&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-#
  31. ^ "ONLY 368 SINS, SAYS MARK TWAIN". New York Sun (New York). 1901-05-10. p. 1. Retrieved 2012-05-22. 

External links[edit]