List of Argentine operas

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This is a list of operas by Argentine composers. Argentina's first native born opera composer was Francisco Hargreaves (1849-1900) who composed La gatta bianca (1875) and Los estudiantes de Bologna (1897), followed by Zenón Rolón (1856-1902) who composed several operas as well as operettas and zarzuelas.[1] The works of many of the composers from this generation were first performed outside Argentina. Native Argentine opera was to develop much more with the massive European (mainly Italian) immigration in the late 19th century and even more with the opening of the Teatro Colón in 1908 where most of the 20th century operas listed here had their world premieres. Some of the first operas to treat Argentine subjects or national themes were Arturo Berutti's Pampa (1897) based on the life of Juan Moreira and Yupanki (1899) based on the life of Inca warrior Manqu Inka Yupanki. Also notable in this genre were Felipe Boero's Tucumán (1918) set during the Battle of Tucumán and El matrero (1929). Considered by many to be the quintessential Argentine opera, El matrero had a libretto based on gaucho folk tradition and incorporated Argentine folk melodies and a traditional gaucho dance.[2] The Spanish playwright Federico García Lorca was also the inspiration for several Argentine operas. His plays, La zapatera prodigiosa and Bodas de sangre, were the basis of operas by Juan José Castro, while Osvaldo Golijov's 2003 opera Ainadamar is based on events in the playwright's life.[3]

List[edit]

19th century[edit]

  • Il fidanzato del mare by Héctor Panizza; opera in one act to a libretto by Romeo Carugati; premiered 15 August 1897, Teatro de la Ópera, Buenos Aires[4]

20th century[edit]

Héctor Panizza (1875-1967)
  • Medioevo latino by Héctor Panizza; opera (triptych) in three acts to a libretto by Luigi Illica; premiered 17 November 1900, Teatro Politeama Genovese, Genoa[4]
  • Aurora by Héctor Panizza; opera in three acts to a libretto by Luigi Illica after Hector Quesada; premiered 5 September 1908, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires (revised version in Spanish premiered 1945)[4]
  • Tucumán by Felipe Boero; opera in one act to a libretto by Leopoldo Díaz; premiered 29 June 1918, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • Ariana y Dionysos by Felipe Boero; opera in one act to a libretto by Leopoldo Díaz; premiered 7 August 1920, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • Raquela by Felipe Boero; opera in one act to a libretto by Víctor Mercadante; premiered 26 June 1923, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • Las Bacantes by Felipe Boero; opera in three acts to a libretto after Euripides, translated by Leopoldo Longhi; premiered 19 September 1925, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • El matrero by Felipe Boero; opera in three acts to a libretto by Yamandú Rodríguez; premiered 12 July 1929, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • Siripo by Felipe Boero; opera in three acts to a libretto by Luis Bayón-Herrera, after Manuel de Lavardén; premiered 8 June 1937, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • Chasca by Enrique Mario Casella, opera in one act, libretto by the composer; premiered 28 August 1939, Teatro Alberdi, Tucumán
  • Bizancio by Héctor Panizza; opera (poema dramático) in three acts to a libretto by Gustavo Macchi after Auguste Bailly, premiered 25 July 1939, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires Buenos Aires[4]
  • Zincalí by Felipe Boero; opera in three acts to a libretto by Arturo Capdevila; premiered 12 November 1954, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[5]
  • Bodas di sangre by Juan José Castro; opera in three acts after Federico Garcia Lorca; premiered 9 August 1956, Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires[8]
  • Barabbas by Alberto Ginastera; opera after Michel de Ghelderode (begun 1977, unfinished)[9]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Apel, Willi (ed.), "Argentina", Harvard Dictionary of Music] 2nd edition, Harvard University Press, 1969, p. 49. ISBN 0-674-37501-7
  2. ^ Béhague, Gerard and Ruiz, Irma. "Argentina", Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (accessed 16 April 2010), grovemusic.com (subscription access).
  3. ^ a b Tommasini, Anthony, "New Operas Remember The Agony Of Lovers Left Behind", New York Times, 13 August 2003
  4. ^ a b c d Schwartz-Kates, Deborah. "Panizza, Héctor", Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (accessed 16 April 2010), grovemusic.com (subscription access).
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Salgado, Susana. "Boero, Felipe", Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (accessed 16 April 2010), grovemusic.com (subscription access).
  6. ^ Puig, Barrett and Campodonico, Cesar, "Uruguay", World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre: The Americas, Taylor and Francis, 2000, p. 495. ISBN 0-415-22745-3
  7. ^ Randel, Don Michael (ed.), "Castro, Juan José", The Harvard Biographical Dictionary of Music, Harvard University Press, 1996, p. 144. ISBN 0-674-37299-9
  8. ^ Plate, Leonor, Óperas, Teatro Colón: Esperando el centenario, Editorial Dunken, 2006, p. 84. ISBN 987-02-2012-6
  9. ^ a b c d Schwartz-Kates, Deborah. "Ginastera, Alberto (Evaristo)", Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (accessed 16 April 2010), grovemusic.com (subscription access).
  10. ^ Zinger, Pablo, "A Composer Defying Categories", New York Times, 4 october 1998
  11. ^ Kennicott, Philip, "'Ainadamar': Agony And Ecstasy in Santa Fe", Washington Post, 15 August 2005, p. C1