List of Arizona ballot propositions

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The following is a partial list of Arizona ballot propositions.

The initiative and referendum process in Arizona has been in use since the beginning. The first initiative was passed the same year Arizona was granted statehood when on November 5, 1912, an initiative relating to women's suffrage was passed by a greater than two to one margin.[1] The initiative process has long been a staple of Arizona politics, with 15 proposals appearing in the 1914 election, and recently in 2006 when voters were presented with 19.

Prior to 1976, ballot propositions were not assigned a measure number. Since then, they have been identified by a 3-digit number. Ballot propositions beginning with "1" are initiatives and referendums to amend the state constitution, those beginning with "2" are initiatives to amend state statutes, and those beginning with "3" are referendums on acts to amend state statutes.

Pre-1990[edit]

The following is a partial list of significant initiatives that passed between 1912 and 1989.

1912[edit]

  • Initiative to grant universal suffrage to women passes by a 2 to 1 margin. Arizona's first ballot measure.

1914[edit]

  • Constitutional amendment protecting citizen initiative from veto power as well as exempting them from repeal by the state legislature.

1916[edit]

  • Initiative to abolish the death penalty passes. A similar initiative failed in 1914. Repealed by another initiative in 1918.

1946[edit]

  • Dual initiatives establishing Arizona as a Right-to-work state pass.

1968[edit]

  • Proposition 104, changed the term of office for Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, Attorney General, and Superintendent of Public Instruction from two years to four effective with the terms beginning in January 1971.

1980[edit]

  • Proposition 200, providing for a state lottery passes by a narrow 51 to 49 margin. [1]

1988[edit]

  • Proposition 106, establishing English as the official state language passes by a narrow 50.5 to 49.5 margin. Later overturned by the Arizona Supreme Court as unconstitutional in 1998.

The Arizona Constitution, Article XXVIII: Section 2. The official language of the state of Arizona is English. Section 3. A. Representatives of government in this state shall preserve, protect and enhance the role of English as the official language of the government of Arizona. Section 3. B. A person shall not be discriminated against or penalized in any way because the person uses or attempts to use English in public or private communication.

Section 4. Official actions shall be conducted in English.

Section 5. Rules of construction, clarifies that The constitution does not "prohibit" other communication. Section 1.notes the law does not apply to: (a) The teaching of or the encouragement of learning languages other than English. (b) Actions required under the federal individuals with disabilities education act or other federal laws. (c) Actions, documents or policies necessary for tourism, commerce or international trade. (d) Actions or documents that protect the public health and safety, including law enforcement and emergency services. (e) Actions that protect the rights of victims of crimes or criminal defendants. (f) Using terms of art or phrases from languages other than English. (g) Using or preserving Native American languages. (h) Providing assistance to hearing impaired or illiterate persons. (i) Informal and nonbinding translations or communications among or between representatives of government and other persons if this activity does not affect or impair supervision, management, conduct or execution of official actions and if the representatives of government make clear that these translations or communications are unofficial and are not binding on this state or a political subdivision of this state. (j) Actions necessary to preserve the right to petition for the redress of grievances. [2]

1990-1999[edit]

1990[edit]

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums.

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 No No 466,089 567,267 Proposed constitutional amendment regarding state school and trust lands. Would allow for the exchange of state trust lands with private or other public lands.
101 No No 401,165 622,210 Proposed constitutional amendment regarding public debt and taxation. Would change the allowed purposes a city or town may incur debt.
102 Yes Yes 543,966 473,111 Proposed constitutional amendment regarding the judicial department. Would prescribe the jurisdiction for justice of the peace courts.
103 No No 354,733 687,977 Proposed constitutional amendment regarding education. Would establish a "classroom improvement program" through additional funding for schools, and requiring core goals be met by school districts.
104 Yes Yes 589,870 443,930 Proposed constitutional amendment regarding victims' rights. Provides victims of crimes with additional rights regarding the prosecution of criminals.
105 No No 180,922 865,289 Proposed constitutional amendment compensation for motor vehicle accidents.
200 Yes Yes 648,046 394,952 Proposal to allow funding from the Arizona State Lottery for the use of the State Parks program and the Game and Fish Department for preservation.
201 No No 231,266 820,653 Proposal to create a state insurance board and create broad regulations regarding automobile insurance.
202 No No 346,926 691,580 Proposal to alter state statutes regarding waste disposal, including groundwater monitoring.
203 No No 156,301 892,794 Proposal to alter statutes regarding automobile insurance.
300 No No 337,868 699,589 Referendum to increase the salaries for elected state officials.
301 No No 251,308 768,763 Referendum on an act to create a state holiday for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.
302 No No 517,882 535,151 Referendum on an act to restore Columbus Day as a state holiday, and create a state holiday for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day/Civil Rights Day.

1992[edit]

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 Yes Yes 927,913 455,712 Amended the constitution to allow a plurality of votes for state executive offices to be sufficient. Previous wording required a runoff election in the event no candidate received a majority of the votes.
101 Yes Yes 745,091 615,306 Amended the constitution to change the length of the term of the office of State Mine Inspector from a two-year term to a four-year term.
102 No No 631,737 720,650 Would have amended the constitution to allow state trust lands to be exchanged for other publicly or privately held lands, provided the lands were of equal value and the purpose of the exchange was to consolidate state lands or to acquire land for public purposes.
103 Yes Yes 1,040,535 314,919 Amended the constitution to require subsequent death sentences in Arizona to be carried out by lethal injection rather than cyanide gas. Inmates already sentenced to death prior to the amendment would be given a choice in the method of execution.
104 Yes Yes 732,030 601,700 Amended the constitution to allow municipal and county governments to request an adjustment to their maximum budgetary spending during all general elections. Previous wording restricted votes on the matter to certain local election events.
105 Yes Yes 701,036 865,289 Amended the constitution to allow counties with a population of 500,000 and greater to establish a charter form of government and to enact local ordinances. Previous wording in the constitution required counties to seek ordinances via the state legislature.
106 No No 701,036 865,289 Would have amended the constitution to allow elementary school districts to incur a debt load equal to 20% of the value of the district's taxable properties. Existing wording limits the debt load to 15%.
107 Yes Yes 1,026,830 356,799 Amended the constitution to enact term limits on various offices. A limit of 4 terms was placed on state legislative offices and the office of State Mine Inspector, a limit of 2 terms was placed on state executive offices, and a limit of 1 term on corporation commission members. The amendment also effectively limited United States Senators to 2 terms and United States Representatives to 3 terms by restricting ballot access; a subsequent US Supreme Court case ruled such state level restrictions as unenforceable.[2]
108 Yes Yes 975,191 381,777 Amended the constitution to require a two-thirds vote by the State Legislature when passing any legislation increasing state revenues through a change in tax allocation, such as an increase in taxation levels or a reduction in credits and exemptions.
109 Yes Yes 738,655 537,475 Amended the constitution to provide for increased public participation in the nomination and evaluation of judges in Maricopa and Pima Counties. The amendment requires public hearings and votes to be held prior to the nomination of any supreme court, court of appeals or superior court judges in these counties.
110 No No 447,654 975,251 Would have amended the constitution to prohibit abortions except in cases of rape, incest, or when deemed necessary to the life of the mother. The amendment would have also provided for court-appointed representation to protect the rights of unborn children.
200 No No 545,977 889,722 Would have created state laws to prohibit the use of certain methods of taking wildlife in the state of Arizona. The prohibition would have included the use of snares and leghold traps, as well as lethal methods including poisons, explosives, flammable and pyrotechnic devices. The prohibition would not have applied to the legal use of firearms in hunting, nor would it have applied to non-lethal use of the above means for wildlife study andmanagement.
300 Yes Yes 880,488 555,189 Combined the observance of Lincoln's and Washington's birthdays into a single President's Day, and established the observance of Martin Luther King Day as an official state holiday.
301 No No 488,271 911,025 Would have increased the salary for state legislatures from $15,000 to $19,748.

1994[edit]

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums.

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 No No 375,336 705,766 Would have amended the constitution to create the office of Lieutenant Governor of Arizona for the purpose of succession in the case of a permanent vacancy of the office of Governor, and to act as Governor during a temporary absence. The proposed wording would have stipulated the office be held by a member of the same party as the Governor and run for office on a joint ticket.
101 No No 432,616 630,955 Would have amended the constitution to allow state trust lands to be exchanged for other publicly or privately held lands, provided the lands were of equal value and the purpose of the exchange was to consolidate state lands or to acquire land for public purposes. Substantially similar to Proposition 102 in 1992, which was rejected.
102 Yes Yes 552,028 515,611 Amended the constitution to exempt animals used primarily for agricultural purposes from being taxed as property.
103 No No 431,846 663,313 Would have amended the constitution to allow for the passage of laws restricting the right of a person to sue for damages due to injury or death, and would allow for the passage of laws restricting the amounts recoverable as damages in such cases. Existing wording prohibits the passage of any laws restricting these rights.
200 Yes Yes 565,096 547,189 Increased the state tax rates on cigarettes and other tobacco products. The majority (70%) of the revenue generated by the tax increase was designated for health care for low-income families. 23% was designated as funding for educational programs aimed at the reduction in the use of tobacco.
201 Yes Yes 635,277 450,581 Amended state laws regarding the taking of wildlife to prohibit certain methods of capture, prohibiting the use of leghold traps, snares and poisons. The prohibition does not apply to wildlife control or the trapping of non fur-bearing rodents. Substantially similar to Proposition 200 in 1992.
300 No No 412,585 614,626 Would have created additional rules and procedures involving the taking of private property for public interests.
301 No No 404,231 646,407 Would have created numerous new rules regarding civil claims.
302 No No 428,324 655,174 Would have raised the salary for state legislatures from $15,000 to $19,750.

1996[edit]

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 No No 520,450 752,145 Would have amended the state constitution to allow the state legislature to specify an effective date for certain types of legislation, including emergency laws, monetary appropriations and tax increases. Existing wording states these types of laws become effective immediately upon being signed by the Governor.
101 Yes Yes 664,231 625,314 Amended the constitution to allow the legislature to pass laws granting partial exemptions on property taxes to properties used for agriculture or enterprise.
102 Yes Yes 844,922 496,720 Amended the constitution to specify that juveniles aged 15 and older who are accused of murder, rape, armed robbery or other violent crimes, or who are otherwise chronic offenders, be prosecuted as adults. The amendment also allows county attorneys to establish community based alternatives in the cases of less serious crimes.
200 Yes Yes 872,235 461,332 Created new state laws regarding controlled substances. Among the new laws are rules stipulating that persons convicted of violent crimes while under the influence of a controlled substance serve 100% of their sentence without parole and allow for the prescribing of controlled substances in certain medical cases.
201 Yes Yes 858,903 484,554 Modified state law to compel the state to enter into gaming compacts with any tribes who had not already negotiated a compact with the state to date, on request of the tribe.
203 Yes Yes 940,588 365,548 Modified state laws to allocate a $17 million of revenues gathered from the state lottery system to health and welfare. Eligibility requirements for state funded health care were also relaxed.
300 No No 412,585 614,626 Would have increased the salary for state legislators from $15,000 to $24,000.

1998[edit]

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 Yes Yes 570,271 358,449 Amended the constitution to add rules to the public retirement system used in the state, applying to various public employees including teachers, law enforcement officers, firefighters, judges, elected officials and other government employees. Among the new rules are a constitutional guarantee that retirement benefits not be reduced or impaired.
101 No No 338,030 602,185 Would have amended the constitution to rename the Commission on Salaries for Elective State Officers to the Arizona Citizens Commission on Salaries for Elective State Officers and increase its membership from 5 to 11. The amendment would have changed the method in which the salaries for state officials, except the legislature, are set.
102 Yes Yes 488,711 427,665 Amended the constitution to allow the state to invest a portion of its trust funds into stocks. Previous wording restricted the investment of state trust funds into interest-bearing equities such as savings accounts and bonds.
103 Yes Yes 576,466 375,832 Amended the constitution to allow voters registered under a minor party or those not declaring party preference to vote in the primary election of the party of their choice. The amendment did not change the requirement that a voter registered under a party holding its own primary must vote in that election.
104 No No 417,926 502,946 Would have amended the constitution with regards to approved ballot measures. The amendment would have prevented the Governor from vetoing any approved measure, and would have prevented the Legislature from repealing any measure for five years. The amendment would also have required a 2/3 vote by the Legislature to amend any approved ballot measure. Proposition 104 was in competition with Proposition 105.
105 Yes Yes 476,770 435,520 Amended the constitution with regards to approved ballot measures. The wording of the amendment prevents the Governor from vetoing any approved measure, and prevents the Legislature from repealing any measure indefinitely. The amendment also requires a 3/4 vote by the Legislature to amend any approved ballot measure. Proposition 105 was in competition with Proposition 104.
200 Yes Yes 481,963 459,373 Established the Citizens Clean Election Commission, to provide for campaign reform via public funding to candidates who agree to certain spending limits in their campaign.
201 Yes Yes 666,058 312,368 Banned cockfighting and made the possession of cocks with intent to fight, participation in cockfighting, or allowing cockfighting to take place on one's property a felony.
202 No No 409,133 499,896 Would have allowed candidates to federal offices to take up a voluntary pledge to eliminate the Internal Revenue Service. Participating candidates would have a note designating their participation next to their name on applicable ballots.
300 No No 418,303 562,091 Would have restricted the prescription of controlled substances to those that received approval of the United States Congress or the Food and Drug Administration. This was a referendum on laws enacted by Proposition 200 of 1996.
301 No No 464,776 494,520 Would have allowed those convicted of a crime involving the possession or use of controlled substances to qualify for parole on their first or second violations, mandating drug treatment or education. This was a referendum on laws enacted by Proposition 200 of 1996.
302 Yes Yes 544,969 421,627 Increased the salaries of state legislators from $15,000 to $24,000.
303 Yes Yes 501,358 446,598 Set aside $20 million annually for the purchase or lease of state trust lands, for the purpose of preservation from development.
304 Yes Yes 652,479 324,514 Extended the termination date of the state lottery program from 1999 to 2003.

2000 to present[edit]

2000[edit]

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums.

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 No No 669,630 706,518 Would have amended the constitution by making several changes dealing with state trust lands. Among the changes would be the conservation of up to 270,000 acres (1,100 km2) as protected lands, the ability to transfer trust lands to school districts without compensation, and change the manner in which lands are sold or transferred.
101 Yes Yes 886,774 546,439 Amended the constitution to update the language with regards to disabilities. The amendment also updated the language to stipulate 18 as the minimum age to vote in line with the US Constitution, as well as dispensing of a one year residency requirement.
102 No No 538,104 896,500 Would have amended the constitution to require subsequent ballot initiatives relating to the taking of wildlife on public lands be passed with a two-thirds majority to take effect.
103 Yes Yes 743,284 659,748 Amended the constitution to expand the Corporation Commission from three to five members, reduce the length of a term from six to four years, and increase the term limit from one to two terms.
104 Yes Yes 906,395 513,825 Amended the constitution to allow property owners over the age of 65 to request that their property valuations for taxation purposes be frozen and immune to increase, provided the property is their primary place of residence.
105 Yes Yes 975,869 450,971 Amended the constitution to exempt cemeteries from property taxation.
106 Yes Yes 784,272 612,686 Amended the constitution to establish the Citizens' Independent Redistricting Commission to draw legislative and congressional district boundaries. Prior wording held the state legislature responsible for redrawing boundaries in accordance with the decennial census.
108 No No 281,017 1,152,998 Would have amended the constitution to deregulate telephone companies in markets where significant competition exists. Existing language stipulates that the Corporation Commission is responsible for setting rates.
200 Yes Yes 837,557 605,094 Would have set into law the method of disbursing and spending the approximately $3.2 billion the state anticipated to collect as part of the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. Targeted for the funds include education aimed at the prevention of tobacco use among minors as well as health care. While this proposition passed, it received less votes that competing measure Proposition 204 and was thus not enacted into law.
202 No No 436,345 1,027,674 Would have enacted a comprehensive reform of growth management, including the requirement for cities and towns with a population of 2500 or greater to adopt growth management plans, prohibiting development beyond identified urban growth regions. The proposition would have also enacted numerous changes to county and municipal zoning procedures.
203 Yes Yes 925,415 542,942 Requires all public school instruction to be given in the English language, except students designated as "English Learners" who would be placed in an intensive English immersion program.
204 Yes Yes 903,134 532,317 Sets into law the method of disbursing and spending the approximately $3.2 billion the state anticipated to collect as part of the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. Targets for the funds include education aimed at the prevention of tobacco use among minors as well as health care. Substantially similar to Proposition 200. As this proposition received more votes, it supersedes the provisions of Proposition 200.
300 No No 521,603 922,462 Would have increased the salaries of legislators from $24,000 to $30,000.
301 Yes Yes 778,807 675,941 Enacts a sales tax increase of 0.6% for 20 years for the purpose of funding education.

2002[edit]

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums.

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 No No 479,702 659,378 Would have amended the constitution to allow counties, cities and towns to incur additional amounts of debt for the construction of transportation infrastructure.
101 No No 558,658 577,462 Would have amended the constitution to allow the state to exchange state trust lands for other public lands, provided the exchange was for land of equal or greater value and conservation of lands was maintained.
102 Yes Yes 907,410 221,281 Amended the constitution to clarify the income requirements pertaining to a section of the constitution allowing senior citizens to freeze their property values with regards to property taxation. This amendment clarified changes enacted by Proposition 104 of 2000.
103 Yes Yes 924,161 224,709 Amended the constitution to add to the list of crimes for which certain accused offenders could not qualify for bail. The amendment added sexual assault, sexual conduct with a minor under 15, and molestation of a minor under 15. Previous wording in the constitution listed capital offenses and felonies under other specific circumstances.
104 Yes Yes 758,695 323,626 Amended the constitution to exempt certain sources of funding from an existing expenditure limit on public school districts. Specifically, revenues earned through a sales tax enacted by Proposition 301 of 2000, as well as Proposition 300 of 2002, were exempted from this restriction.
200 No No 173,126 995,686 Would have directed the Governor to enter into revised gaming compacts with any of the native tribes that request a new compact.
201 No No 234,935 947,341 Would have directed the Governor to enter into revised gaming compacts with any tribe upon request. This proposition would have also modified existing state law to allow for the use of slot machines on horse and dog racing facilities.
202 Yes Yes 610,900 590,064 Directed the Governor to enter into revised gaming compacts with any of the native tribes that request a new compact. This proposition differed from Proposition 200 in its allocation of the state's share of gaming revenues as well as imposing additional limits on the location of gaming facilities.
203 No No 504,607 678,446 Would have decriminalized the possession and use of small quantities of marijuana. The proposal would also have required the state to supply 2 ounces of medical grade marijuana to certain seriously or terminally ill patients.
300 Yes Yes 855,687 274,316 Redirected certain budgetary surpluses from the state land trust program to education. The statute specified that these funds were to be in addition to, rather than a replacement for, funding of education from other sources.
301 Yes Yes 845,072 317,246 Extended the expiration date of the state lottery program from 2003 to 2012.
302 Yes Yes 803,354 348,369 Allowed first time offenders of personal drug use or possession to be eligible for treatment and probation in lieu of incarceration except in cases where other drug related crimes have been committed.
303 Yes Yes 791,295 389,619 Increased the tax rate on cigarettes and other tobacco products by over 100%, while maintaining the current laws regarding the expenditure of the revenues from the sale of tobacco products.
304 No No 361,902 771,271 Would have increased the salary for state legislators from $24,000 to $36,000.

2004[edit]

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums.

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 No No 818,497 892,654 Would have amended the constitution to allow for the exchange of state trust lands with other public lands. Substantially similar to Proposition 101 of 2002.
101 Yes Yes 894,807 726,167 Amended the constitution to require all subsequent ballot initiatives and referendums specify a new source of revenue for any required expenditure.
102 No No 792,277 853,632 Would have amended the constitution to allow the state to license or transfer any technology or intellectual property created within the state university system in exchange for ownership interests or securities in the acquiring company.
103 Yes Yes 896,706 767,253 Amended the constitution to require that any temporary appointments to the office of Justice of the Peace have the same qualifications as a permanent candidate for the office.
104 No No 536,410 1,147,169 Would have amended the constitution to move the filing deadline for ballot initiatives from 4 months prior to the election, to 7 months. Petitions would still be allowed to circulate for 20 months prior to the deadline.
105 Yes Yes 1,046,048 638,620 Amended the constitution to add 2 positions to the State Board of Education.
200 Yes Yes 1,041,741 830,467 Requires that voters be able to produce both identification and proof of citizenship prior to being allowed to vote in any election. The same requirements were also enacted for any person prior to receiving any state or locally funded benefits.
300 No No 699,575 1,076,494 Would have raised the salary of state legislators from $24,000 to $36,000.

2006[edit]

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums. Full text of each proposition is available here.

Prop.
num.
passed YES
votes
NO
votes
description
100 Yes Yes 1,170,961 332,461 Proposed amendment to the constitution to deny bail to persons charged with serious felonies who are in the US illegally. proposed statute
101 Yes Yes 736,169 715,154 Proposed amendment to the constitution to modify the method in which cities, towns, counties and educational districts calculate property tax levies. proposed statute
102 Yes Yes 1,102,237 382,714 Proposed amendment to the constitution to deny the award of punitive damages in civil court cases to persons who are in the US illegally. proposed statute
103 Yes Yes 1,114,273 391,497 Proposed amendment to the constitution to declare English the official language of the state. proposed statute
104 Yes Yes 849,097 580,639 Proposed amendment to the constitution to allow cities and towns to take on more debt for the maintenance of transportation infrastructure and basic city services. proposed statute
105 No No 410,106 1,020,807 Proposed amendment to the constitution to create up to 400,000 acres (1,600 km²) of non-urban trust land for conservation in exchange for the sale of trust land designated as urban. proposed statute
106 No No 701,646 739,540 Proposed amendment to the constitution to allow the creation of 694,000 acres (2,810 km2) of trust land for conservation while permitting the conveyance of other state lands without auction. proposed statute
107 No No 721,489 775,498 'Protect Marriage Arizona' - Proposed amendment to the constitution to define marriage as being between a man and a woman and prohibiting the creation of a legal status similar to marriage for unmarried persons. proposed statute
200 No No 496,641 991,284 'Arizona Voter Reward Act' proposing the creation of a $1,000,000 reward in a random lottery to promote voter participation. proposed statute
201 Yes Yes 828,685 684,711 'Smoke-Free Arizona Act' proposing a ban on smoking in all public places and places of employment while exempting private residences, tobacco stores, designated smoking rooms in hotels/motels, veterans/fraternal clubs, Native American religious ceremonies and outdoor patios. proposed statute
202 Yes Yes 987,347 523,070 Proposal to increase the state minimum wage to $6.75. proposed statute
203 Yes Yes 793,312 698,286 Proposal to establish an early childhood development program funded through an increase on state tobacco taxes. proposed statute
204 Yes Yes 926,913 569,190 'Humane Treatment of Animals Act' proposing to ban certain confining of pigs or calves. proposed statute
205 No No 431,879 1,060,467 'Your Right to Vote by Mail Act' proposing a requirement that a mail-in ballot be distributed to every registered voter and all elections be conducted via mail. proposed statute
206 No No 640,851 861,440 'Arizona Non-Smoker Protection Act' proposing to ban smoking in public places and places of employment except bars that prohibit minors and have separate ventilation systems, private residences, tobacco stores, designated hotel/motel rooms, veterans and fraternal clubs, Native American religious ceremonies, and outdoor patios. proposed statute
207 Yes Yes 955,533 519,161 'Private Property Rights Protection Act' proposing to establish additional rights for individuals whose property is taken through eminent domain; also prohibiting the taking of property for economic development. proposed statute
300 Yes Yes 1,060,444 423,994 Referendum on a proposal to require citizenship for eligibility for various subsidized services such as in-state tuition and financial assistance. proposed statute
301 Yes Yes 856,591 620,549 Referendum on a proposal to make ineligible for mandatory probation persons convicted of offenses involving the use of methamphetamines. proposed statute
302 No No 707,861 774,928 Referendum on a proposal to increase state legislators' salaries. proposed statute

2008[edit]

The following results are based on returns as of November 5, 2008, and represent 99.1% of all ballots counted. Vote tallies will be updated when the remainder of returns are available.

Shaded entries indicate citizen initiatives and referendums.

Prop.
num.
passed YES votes NO votes description
100 Yes Yes 1,355,494 407,722 Amendment to the constitution to prohibit the creation of any state level tax on the sale or transfer of real property.
101 No No[3] 1,048,510 1,057,197 Proposed amendment to the constitution to guarantee the freedom of choice regarding health care providers and system.
102 Yes Yes 1,039,606 801,279 Amendment to the constitution defining marriage as being between a man and a woman only.
105 No No 595,638 1,142,732 Proposed amendment to the constitution to prevent the subsequent passage of any initiative measure imposing additional taxes or spending, except when approved by a majority of all qualified voters, turnout notwithstanding.
200 No No 710,087 1,042,413 Proposal to reform the payday loan industry with several pro-consumer changes including reduced rate limits, no-cost repayment options and borrowing caps on consumers. Proposal would extend existing exemptions for payday loan industry regarding maximum interest rates.
201 No No 386,281 1,359,743 Proposal to create a homeowners' "Bill of Rights", mandating certain rights for the purchasers of new homes including a guaranteed ten-year warranty, right to demand correction of construction mistakes and the right to participate in the selection of contractors to enact repairs.
202 No No 725,963 1,048,966 Proposition 202 changes current Arizona law that prohibits employers from intentionally or knowingly employing an alien who is not authorized under federal law to work in the United States. Under Proposition 202, the definition of "knowingly employ an unauthorized alien" would be changed to require actual knowledge by an owner or officer of the employer.
300 No No 630,676 1,147,956 Referred proposal to increase the salaries of state legislators to $30,000.

2010[edit]

Special election[edit]

On May 18, 2010, a special state-wide election will be held to vote on Proposition 100, to raise the state sales tax by 1%.

Prop.
num.
passed YES votes NO votes description
100 Yes Yes 750,850 416,571 Proposal to temporarily raises the Arizona state sales tax by 1 percent, with the proceeds going to education, health and human services, and public safety.

General elections[edit]

Prop.
num.
passed YES votes NO votes description
106 Yes Yes 892,693 722,300 prohibit mandating participation in any health care system; prohibit fines for not participating
107 Yes Yes 952,086 647,713 Ban preferential acceptance to employment
109 No No 714,144 926,991 Would give a constitutional protection to the right to hunt in Arizona
110 No No 792,394 801,670 Authorizes exchange of state trust lands in order to protect military installations.
111 No No 655,252 951,820 Rename the position of Secretary of State to Lieutenant Governor.
112 No No 792,697 792,825 Change petition drive deadline by two months earlier than current deadline.
113 Yes Yes 978,109 639,692 Extend the right of Arizonans to use a secret ballot in union elections
203 Yes Yes 841,348 837,008 The Arizona Medical Marijuana Act protects terminally or seriously ill patients from state prosecution for using limited amounts of marijuana on their doctor's recommendation.
301 No No 416,323 1,185,461 Transfer money from a land-conservation fund to the general fund
302 No No 492,060 1,142,744 Measure to repeal First Things First early childhood program

2012[edit]

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

121

204

References[edit]

"Arizona Elections Results". Retrieved 2007-03-01.