List of Birmingham City F.C. managers

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Steve Bruce oversaw Birmingham City's 2002 promotion to the Premier League.

This chronological list of managers of Birmingham City Football Club comprises all those who have held the position of manager of the first team of Birmingham City and its predecessors Small Heath and Birmingham since the club was first admitted to the Football League in 1892. Each manager's entry includes his dates of tenure and the club's overall competitive record (in terms of matches won, drawn and lost), honours won and significant achievements while under his care. Caretaker managers are included, where known, as well as those who have been in permanent charge.

History[edit]

In the early days, team management was undertaken by a club committee. When payment of players was legalised in 1885, Alfred Jones began to act as club secretary on a voluntary basis. Small Heath's election to the newly formed Second Division of the Football League in 1892 prompted the board of directors to appoint him as the club's first paid official, responsible as secretary-manager for matters on the field in addition to his administrative duties. In his first season the club won the inaugural Second Division championship, and gained promotion to the First Division for the first time the following year via the Test Match system. Jones's 16-year tenure saw three promotions and three relegations, after the last of which in 1908 he resigned.[1][2] Successor Alex Watson's two seasons in charge ended with the club having to apply for re-election to the league[3] and with responsibility for team affairs passing to former player Bob McRoberts, who became the club's first dedicated team manager.[4]

Frank Richards succeeded Watson as club secretary in 1911, and when the First World War broke out he took over the managerial reins as well. Under Richards Birmingham won the Second Division title in 1921 and signed players such as Joe Bradford, Johnny Crosbie and Dan Tremelling who did much to keep the club in the top flight through the 1920s. He also forgot to enter them in the 1922 FA Cup.[5][6] Billy Beer[7] and Bill Harvey[8] kept them in the First Division, albeit in the lower half of the table, before former Arsenal manager Leslie Knighton took charge in 1928. He led them to their first FA Cup final in 1931 and a top-half league finish the following year, but left when Chelsea made him an offer Birmingham were unable to match.[9] Former Birmingham defender George Liddell kept them in the top tier until they were relegated in the last season completed before the Second World War, resigning in September 1939 when league football was suspended. His tenure of just over six years made him the club's longest-serving team manager.[10]

Harry Storer, appointed just before the war ended, won the championship of the 1945–46 Football League South wartime league and the Second Division title two years later.[11] Under Bob Brocklebank Birmingham were relegated from the First Division, but they reached the semifinal of the 1951 FA Cup and Brocklebank signed many of the players moulded by Arthur Turner into a successful team.[12] Turner won promotion in 1955, the next season led the team to their highest league finish of sixth place and their second FA Cup final,[13] and in 1957 reached the semifinals of both the FA Cup and the inaugural Inter-Cities Fairs Cup competition.[14] In 1958 the club experimented with a joint appointment, hiring Pat Beasley to work alongside Turner; the experiment annoyed Turner and after six months prompted his resignation.[15] Beasley and successor Gil Merrick took the club to successive finals of the Fairs Cup in 1960 and 1961. Merrick managed the club to their first major trophy, the League Cup in 1963, beating local rivals Aston Villa 3–1 on aggregate, but four years in the bottom six places earned him the sack.[16][17]

Jim Smith managed Birmingham between 1978 and 1982.

Joe Mallett presided over relegation before acting as assistant to Stan Cullis,[18] who laid the foundations for the team's future success before retiring from football in 1970.[19] Chosen only after abortive approaches were made to Don Revie, Brian Clough and Ronnie Allen,[20] Freddie Goodwin converted the attractive but inconsistent football of Cullis's teams to a skilful, aggressive game capable of winning promotion and maintaining top-flight status.[21] The side struggled after Goodwin sold Bob Latchford, so first-team coach Willie Bell was promoted to manager, initially in a caretaker capacity.[22] After achieving little in two years,[23] Bell was replaced by club director Sir Alf Ramsey, whose brief managerial tenure ended with him leaving the club entirely.[A] Jim Smith brought experienced players to the club[26] but was sacked to make way for Ron Saunders, who had just walked out on league champions and local rivals Aston Villa.[B]

Financial difficulties and instability at board level led to six managerial changes in seven years. Saunders resigned after FA Cup defeat to non-league Altrincham,[28] John Bond seemed out of touch,[29] and in April 1989, once relegation to the Third Division for the first time in the club's history was confirmed, the club's new owners replaced Garry Pendrey with Dave Mackay.[30] Within 18 months, with relegation to the Fourth Division a possibility, Mackay resigned.[31] Lou Macari came in, revitalised the side, won the Associate Members Cup[C] at Wembley, and three weeks later walked out to join Stoke City.[32] Terry Cooper won promotion back to the second tier and kept the team going during four months of administration before he quit, fearing new owner David Sullivan would want to bring in his own man.[33]

Alex McLeish faces the media after Birmingham's 2009 promotion.

Southend United manager Barry Fry, hired at the cost of a record fine for "poaching",[34] failed to avoid relegation but combined the Division Two title with another victorious trip to Wembley in the Football League Trophy[C] in 1995. After one ineffectual season in the second tier which brought his total of players used up to 61, he was sacked.[35] Trevor Francis introduced Premier League players to the team and took them to the 2001 League Cup final, but three successive play-off semifinal defeats led to his departure by mutual consent.[36] Two months later, after the dispute over his release from previous employers Crystal Palace reached the High Court, Steve Bruce took charge.[37] Bruce, the ninth former player to have served as permanent manager, led the club to promotion via the play-offs in his first season; his tenure of nearly six years made him the club's longest-serving post-war manager.[38] After uncertainty surrounding a takeover bid for the club led Bruce to accept the managerial post at Wigan Athletic,[39] former Scotland manager Alex McLeish was appointed in November 2007.[40]

Unable to avoid relegation at the end of his first part-season,[41] McLeish led the team back to the Premier League at the first attempt in 2009,[42] then guided them to a 12-game unbeaten run, a club record in the top division,[43] and a ninth-place finish, their best since 1959.[44] McLeish led Birmingham to their first major trophy in 48 years, by beating Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup Final,[45] then took them back to the second tier.[46] Amid rumours of his being favourite for Aston Villa's managerial vacancy, McLeish resigned by email in June 2011.[47] His successor, former Newcastle United manager Chris Hughton, led the club into the Europa League group stage, narrowly failed to qualify for the knockout rounds, and reached the play-off semi-finals.[48] With the club in financial turmoil and under a transfer embargo, Hughton left for Premier League Norwich City.[49] Lee Clark, dismissed by Huddersfield Town earlier in 2012,[50] led Birmingham to a mid-table finish in his first season in charge. The following season under Clark saw the club narrowly avoid dropping into the 3rd tier, with a stoppage time equaliser by Paul Caddis at Bolton Wanderers in the last game of the 2013-14 season keeping them up on goal difference.[51]

Managers[edit]

All first-team matches in national or international competition are counted, except the abandoned 1939–40 Football League season and matches in wartime leagues and cups.

Manager dates and statistics are sourced from Matthews (1995) for Jones and Watson,[52] The Birmingham City FC Archive for McRoberts to Francis,[53][54] and Soccerbase thereafter.[38] Omissions and other discrepancies are corrected with input from Matthews (1995), Matthews (2000) and elsewhere, and are noted in the table. Names of caretaker managers are supplied where known, and periods of caretaker-management are highlighted in italics and marked caretaker. Win percentage is rounded to one decimal place.

Statistics are complete up to and including the match played on 3 May 2014.

Key

M: Matches played W: Matches won D: Matches drawn L: Matches lost

Name Nationality From To M W D L Win% Honours and achievements[55] Notes
Jones, AlfredAlfred Jones English July 1892 June 1908 566 260 108 198 45.9 Second Division championship 1893
Second Division promotion 1894, 1901, 1903
[D]
Watson, AlexAlex Watson English July 1908 June 1910 78 22 16 40 28.2 [D]
McRoberts, BobBob McRoberts Scottish July 1910 May 1915 203 77 47 79 37.9 [E][F]
Richards, FrankFrank Richards English May 1915 May 1923 173 78 36 59 45.1 Second Division championship 1921 [D]
Beer, BillyBilly Beer English May 1923 March 1927 163 62 36 65 38.0 [F]
Harvey, BillBill Harvey English March 1927 May 1928 58 20 16 22 34.5 [F]
Knighton, LeslieLeslie Knighton English August 1928 May 1933 229 87 51 91 38.0 FA Cup runner-up 1931 [D]
Liddell, GeorgeGeorge Liddell English July 1933 September 1939 267 82 76 109 30.7 [F]
Camkin, BillBill Camkin English September 1939 November 1944 0 0 0 0 ! [D][G]
Goodier, TedTed Goodier caretaker English November 1944 May 1945 0 0 0 0 ! [G]
Storer, HarryHarry Storer English June 1945 November 1948 114 59 30 25 51.8 Football League South wartime league championship 1946
Second Division championship 1948
[H]
Walter Taylor caretaker November 1948 January 1949 9 3 1 5 33.3 [I]
Brocklebank, BobBob Brocklebank English January 1949 October 1954 263 102 71 90 38.8
Turner, ArthurArthur Turner English November 1954 February 1958 166 74 35 57 44.6 Second Division championship 1955
Club's highest First Division placing (6th) 1956
FA Cup finalist 1956
[F][J]
Turner, ArthurArthur Turner
Beasley, PatPat Beasley
English
English
February 1958 September 1958 17 6 5 6 35.3 [K]
Beasley, PatPat Beasley English September 1958 May 1960 95 39 20 36 41.1 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup runner-up 1960 [L]
Merrick, GilGil Merrick English May 1960 28 April 1964[60] 202 64 46 92 31.7 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup runner-up 1961
League Cup winner 1963
[F]
Mallett, JoeJoe Mallett English July 1964 27 December 1965 66 15 16 35 22.7 [M]
Cullis, StanStan Cullis English 27 December 1965 18 March 1970 214 87 51 76 40.7 [M]
Dorman, DonDon Dorman caretaker
Bill Shorthouse caretaker
English
English
18 March 1970 29 May 1970 6 1 0 5 16.7
Goodwin, FreddieFreddie Goodwin English 29 May 1970 18 September 1975 269 99 83 87 36.8 Second Division promotion 1972 [N]
Bell, WillieWillie Bell Scottish 18 September 1975 5 September 1977 91 28 20 43 30.8
Ramsey, Sir AlfSir Alf Ramsey English 8 September 1977 6 March 1978 28 11 4 13 39.3
Smith, JimJim Smith English 12 March 1978 15 February 1982 182 59 50 73 32.4 Second Division promotion 1980
Bodell, NormanNorman Bodell caretaker English 15 February 1982 22 February 1982 2 1 0 1 50.0 [B]
Saunders, RonRon Saunders English 22 February 1982 16 January 1986 202 72 53 77 35.6 Second Division promotion 1985 [B]
Leonard, KeithKeith Leonard caretaker English 16 January 1986 22 January 1986 1 0 0 1 00.0 [64]
Bond, JohnJohn Bond English 23 January 1986 27 May 1987 65 17 20 28 26.2
Pendrey, GarryGarry Pendrey English 28 May 1987 26 April 1989 98 20 27 51 20.4 [F]
Mackay, DaveDave Mackay Scottish 26 April 1989 23 January 1991 91 34 27 30 37.4
Coldwell, BillBill Coldwell caretaker English 23 January 1991 7 February 1991 3 2 1 0 66.7
Macari, LouLou Macari Scottish 7 February 1991 18 June 1991 24 12 6 6 50.0 Associate Members Cup[C] 1991
Cooper, TerryTerry Cooper English 9 August 1991 29 November 1993 135 48 36 51 35.6 Third Division promotion 1992
Broadhurst, KevanKevan Broadhurst caretaker
Trevor Morgan caretaker
English
English
29 November 1993 10 December 1993 1 0 0 1 00.0
Fry, BarryBarry Fry English 10 December 1993 7 May 1996 156 68 44 44 43.6 Football League Trophy[C] 1995
Division Two (level 3) championship 1995
Francis, TrevorTrevor Francis English 10 May 1996 15 October 2001 290 139 70 81 47.9 League Cup finalist 2001 [F]
Mills, MickMick Mills caretaker
Jim Barron caretaker
English
English
15 October 2001 12 December 2001 12 5 4 3 41.7
Bruce, SteveSteve Bruce English 12 December 2001 23 November 2007 270 100 70 100 37.0 Division One (level 2) promotion 2002
The Championship (level 2) promotion 2007
[F][O]
Black, EricEric Black caretaker Scottish 23 November 2007 27 November 2007 1 0 0 1 00.0 [O][P]
McLeish, AlexAlex McLeish Scottish 28 November 2007 12 June 2011 168 62 51 55 36.9 The Championship (level 2) promotion 2009
League Cup winner 2011
Hughton, ChrisChris Hughton Irish 22 June 2011 7 June 2012 62 26 21 15 41.9
Clark, LeeLee Clark English 26 June 2012 present 102 30 30 42 29.4

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ramsey's biographer has him "locked in an increasingly bitter three-way dispute with his star player, Trevor Francis, and the board". After initially accepting the player's transfer request, the board changed their minds, fearful they would "incur the wrath of already disgruntled fans". Ramsey duly handed in his notice.[24] The Times reported that "Sir Alf said he told the board two weeks ago that he intended to quit and sever his links with the club. ... He said at a board meeting on February 20 he recommended both Francis and the defender, Joe Gallagher, should be transfer listed. The board agreed but three days later changed their minds about Francis. Sir Alf said he then decided to opt out because of the board's policy."[25]
  2. ^ a b c Saunders was announced as Birmingham manager on Thursday 18 February 1982, having walked out on local rivals Aston Villa some two weeks earlier. As the Birmingham derby was scheduled for the Saturday, he took over formally as manager after the derby on Monday 22 February. "Mr Saunders said that the final formalities were in the hands of solicitors and accountants and, subject to completion of the details, he would be taking over on Monday, Norman Bodell, acting as manager since Jim Smith was suddenly dismissed on Monday, will be in charge of the side for the local derby."[27]
  3. ^ a b c d The Associate Members Cup was renamed the Football League Trophy in 1992. It is popularly known by its sponsored names, the Leyland DAF Cup in 1991 and the Auto Windscreens Shield in 1995.
  4. ^ a b c d e Secretary-manager.
  5. ^ Club's first full-time manager.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Formerly played for the club.
  7. ^ a b Took charge of matches in wartime leagues/cups only.
  8. ^ BCFC Archive totals omit ten games in 1945–46 FA Cup.
  9. ^ The club's chief scout Walter Taylor was appointed assistant team manager shortly after Storer's resignation and acted as caretaker until Brocklebank's appointment.[56] As BCFC Archive doesn't specify detail for period between Storer and Brocklebank, statistics are sourced from Matthews (1995).[57]
  10. ^ Turner was the first manager to manage an English club side in European competition, when Birmingham played their first group game in the 1955–58 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup on 15 May 1956, a goalless draw away at Internazionale. The competition lasted over three English seasons with the final not played until 1958. (The London XI, a representative side made up of players from several London clubs, were the first English team when they played their first group game in the same competition in 1955.)[58]
  11. ^ Joint appointment.
  12. ^ Beasley was appointed "acting manager" when Turner left in September 1958, becoming manager in January 1959.[59] He was the first manager to manage an English club side to the final of a European competition. The home leg of the 1958–60 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup final against Barcelona, a goalless draw, was played on 29 March 1960; Barcelona won the away leg 4–1. (The London XI were the first English team when they reached the final of the 1955–58 Fairs Cup.)[58]
  13. ^ a b Cullis accepted the managerial position on 7 December 1965,[61] but did not take up his duties until 27 December.[62]
  14. ^ BCFC Archive totals include the away leg of the Texaco Cup quarter final match against Newcastle United, abandoned at 1–1 and later replayed.[63]
  15. ^ a b Soccerbase has Bruce replaced by Black on 19 November 2007. Wigan Athletic announced Bruce as their new manager on that date, but a financial dispute meant he did not officially leave Birmingham until 23 November, when Eric Black took over officially as caretaker.[39][65]
  16. ^ Soccerbase has Black leaving on 28 November 2007, the date of McLeish's appointment, but in fact he left the day before.[66]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ Matthews (2000), "Jones, Alfred", p. 127.
  2. ^ Matthews (1995), pp. 8–9.
  3. ^ Matthews (2000), "Watson, Alexander", p. 231.
  4. ^ Matthews (2000), "McRoberts, Bob", pp. 145–46.
  5. ^ Matthews (2000), "Richards, Frank", p. 190.
  6. ^ Matthews (1995), pp. 14–15.
  7. ^ Matthews (2000), "Beer, Billy", pp. 27–28.
  8. ^ Matthews (2000), "Harvey, Billy", p. 107.
  9. ^ Matthews (2000), "Knighton, Albert Leslie", p. 130.
  10. ^ Matthews (2000), "Liddell, George", p. 138.
  11. ^ Matthews (2000), "Storer, Harry", p. 212.
  12. ^ Matthews (2000), "Brocklebank, Bob", p. 42.
  13. ^ Matthews (2000), "Turner, Arthur", p. 225.
  14. ^ Matthews (1995), p. 29.
  15. ^ Matthews (1995), pp. 61–62.
  16. ^ Matthews (2000), "Merrick, Gil", p. 154.
  17. ^ "Gil Merrick". Birmingham City F.C. Archived from the original on 22 June 2009. 
  18. ^ Matthews (2000), "Mallett, Joe", p. 147.
  19. ^ Matthews (2000), "Cullis, Stan", p. 63.
  20. ^ Matthews (2000), "Managers", p. 147–48.
  21. ^ Matthews (1995), pp. 37–38.
  22. ^ "Willie Bell – Hewn of Scottish granite". The Mighty Mighty Whites. Retrieved 18 February 2008. 
  23. ^ Matthews (1995), p. 39.
  24. ^ McKinstry, Leo (2006). Sir Alf. London: Harper Sport. pp. 486–87. ISBN 978-0-00-719378-3. 
  25. ^ "Francis issue caused Sir Alf to quit". The Times. 9 March 1978. p. 14. 
  26. ^ Matthews (1995), pp. 39–42.
  27. ^ Jones, Stuart (19 February 1982). "Villa's loss becomes Birmingham's gain". The Times. p. 20. 
  28. ^ Walker, Paul (27 January 2008). "Havant enter Cup folklore". sportinglife.com. Press Association. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. 
  29. ^ Matthews (1995), p. 65.
  30. ^ Tattum, Colin (22 January 2008). "Blues legends – Garry Pendrey". Birmingham Mail. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  31. ^ Matthews (1995), p. 47–48.
  32. ^ Moore, Chris (19 June 1991). "Ambitious Macari appointed by Stoke". The Times. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  33. ^ Walker, Andy (17 October 2007). "Cooper: Stay put Brucey". Sunday Mercury (Birmingham). Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  34. ^ Shaw, Phil (18 February 1994). "Sullivan stung for £130,000 over Fry: Birmingham's blues". The Independent (London). Retrieved 5 May 2009. 
  35. ^ Shaw, Phil (8 May 1996). "Francis fancied as Fry is sacked". The Independent (London). Retrieved 6 September 2009. 
  36. ^ "Francis leaves Blues". BBC Sport. 15 October 2001. Retrieved 12 October 2007. 
  37. ^ "Birmingham unveil Bruce". BBC Sport. 12 December 2001. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  38. ^ a b "Birmingham Manager History". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  39. ^ a b "Bruce leaves Birmingham for Wigan". BBC Sport. 20 November 2007. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  40. ^ "Birmingham unveil McLeish as boss". BBC Sport. 28 November 2007. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  41. ^ McKenzie, Andrew (11 May 2008). "Birmingham 4–1 Blackburn". BBC Sport. Retrieved 12 May 2008. 
  42. ^ Fletcher, Paul (3 May 2009). "Birmingham clinch top-flight spot". BBC Sport. Retrieved 3 May 2009. 
  43. ^ "McLeish proud of Blues". Sky Sports. 9 January 2010. Retrieved 25 March 2010. 
  44. ^ Roopanarine, Les (9 May 2010). "Bolton 2–1 Birmingham". BBC Sport. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  45. ^ Hytner, David (27 February 2011). "Birmingham City win is 'my greatest achievement', says Alex McLeish". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 March 2011. 
  46. ^ Wiechula, Frank (23 May 2011). "Worst moment of my career, says Alex McLeish". Daily Express. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  47. ^ "Alex McLeish resigns as Birmingham manager". BBC Sport. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 12 June 2011. 
  48. ^ Hardy, Martin (7 April 2012). "Chris Hughton: Low key, highly regarded". The Independent. Retrieved 11 May 2012. 
  49. ^ "Chris Hughton appointed as new Norwich City manager". BBC Sport. 7 June 2012. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  50. ^ "Lee Clark named new Birmingham City manager". BBC Sport. 26 June 2012. Retrieved 27 June 2012. 
  51. ^ "Match Report: Bolton 2-2 Birmingham". BBC Sport. 3 May 2014. Retrieved 6 May 2014. 
  52. ^ Matthews (1995), pp. 141–56.
  53. ^ "Managers". The Birmingham City FC Archive. Tony Jordan. Archived from the original on 10 April 2003. 
  54. ^ "Manager Analysis". The Birmingham City FC Archive. Tony Jordan. Archived from the original on 10 April 2003. 
  55. ^ "Birmingham City". Statto. Retrieved 24 June 2010.  Click on "Past Seasons / History" in left-hand navigation bar.
  56. ^ "Managership of B'ham City". Birmingham Mail. 1 December 1948. p. 4. 
  57. ^ Matthews (1995), p. 184.
  58. ^ a b Ross, James M. (13 July 2006). "European Cups Archive". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation (RSSSF). Retrieved 27 July 2007. 
  59. ^ Matthews (1995), p. 62.
  60. ^ "Birmingham City ask Merrick to resign". The Guardian. 29 April 1964. p. 16. "Yesterday Mr W. Adams, the secretary of Birmingham City, issued the following statement: 'Mr Gil Merrick met the board this morning who notified him that changes and complete reorganisation of the club were to take place, and asked him to resign. To this Mr Merrick agreed.'" 
  61. ^ "Cullis to manage Birmingham City". The Times. 8 December 1965. p. 4. 
  62. ^ Cullis, Stan (10 December 1965). "Why soccer has won me back". Daily Express. p. 20. 
  63. ^ "Season 1973/74". Toonarama. Archived from the original on 25 March 2008. 
  64. ^ "Bond favourite for Birmingham job". The Times. 23 January 1986. Retrieved 27 November 2007. 
  65. ^ "Bruce confirmed as Wigan manager". BBC Sport. 23 November 2007. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  66. ^ "Birmingham lose caretaker Black". BBC Sport. 27 November 2007. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 

External links[edit]