List of Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. seasons

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For details of the current season, see 2012–13 Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. season.
Individual portraits of twelve young men in football kit surround a silver cup and a shield. Either side are a list of goalscorers and a summary of match results.
The Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. team of 1909–10, winners of the Southern League title and the Southern Professional Charity Cup

Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club is an English association football club based in the city of Brighton and Hove, East Sussex. The club was founded in 1901 and played in the Southern League from the 1901–02 season until 1920, when that league's first division was absorbed into the Football League. In 1910, they won the Southern League title and defeated Football League champions Aston Villa in the FA Charity Shield. As a Football League team, Albion have won three divisional titles at the third level of the English football league system and two at the fourth. They played in the 1983 FA Cup Final, losing to Manchester United after a replay, and their best achievement in the League Cup was in 1978–79 when they reached the quarter-final.

As of the end of the 2012–13 season, the team have spent 7 seasons in the fourth tier of the English football league system, 55 in the third, 20 in the second and 4 in the top tier. The table details the team's achievements and the top goalscorer in senior first-team competitions from their first season in the Southern League and FA Cup in 1901–02 to the end of the most recently completed season.

History[edit]

After Brighton United and then Brighton & Hove Rangers disbanded, a new professional football club was formed at a meeting held in the Seven Stars Hotel in June 1901. The club adopted the name Brighton & Hove Albion and took over Brighton & Hove Rangers' place in the Southern League Second Division.[1] They also entered the FA Cup for the first time, disposing of Brighton Athletic, Eastbourne, and Hastings & St Leonards before succumbing 3–2 at home to Clapton in the third qualifying round.[2] The Goldstone Ground became Albion's permanent home in their second season, when the club entered a team in the South Eastern League to provide additional matches on those Saturdays free of Southern League or cup fixtures.[3] Albion lost out on the 1903 Southern League Second Division title on goal average, but gained promotion to the First Division via the test match system.[4] The committee's recommendation against accepting the promotion on financial grounds was overruled by the membership,[5] but their fears were justified when the club lost £1,500 on their first year's trading as a limited company. To raise income from additional matches, a team was entered in the United League in 1905–06; these matches were played in midweek, because Saturdays and public holidays during the playing season were fully taken up by the Southern League and FA Cup.[6]

In 1909–10, they won their first major title. The Times wrote that "Brighton and Hove Albion have not had much difficulty in finishing at the head of the Southern League, and for that reason the competition has lost some of its interest, though probably the rivalry between the teams has been as keen as ever."[7] This achievement earned them a place in the FA Charity Shield to face reigning Football League champions Aston Villa; Albion won 1–0 with a second-half goal from Charlie Webb.[8]

Under the management of Webb, who was offered the post while awaiting repatriation from a German prisoner-of-war camp,[9] the club joined the Football League in 1920, when a Third Division was formed from the Southern League First Division of the preceding season.[4] Between the wars, Albion finished regularly in the top half of the Third Division South, but saved their best form for the FA Cup, eliminating numerous First Division sides from the competition.[10] In the 1922–23 season, they were drawn to play the amateur club Corinthian in that club's first ever match in the FA Cup competition. Interest was such that the game was filmed for cinematic release, and Brighton's eventual victory, in a second replay at Chelsea's ground, Stamford Bridge, was watched by a Monday-afternoon crowd of 45,000.[10][11] Ten years later, an administrative oversight meant they failed to apply for exemption to the later rounds of the FA Cup, so had to begin at the first qualifying round, progressing through eight rounds to the last 16 of the competition before losing to West Ham United after a replay.[12]

In 1948 Albion successfully applied for re-election to the League after finishing bottom for the first time.[13] After several near misses, they were promoted as champions to the Second Division in 1958,[14] and five years later, two successive relegations took them into Division Four.[4] Former Tottenham Hotspur and England centre-forward Bobby Smith's 19 goals alongside Wally Gould's 21 made a major contribution to Albion winning the Fourth Division title in 1965,[15] and seven years later the team made a brief return to Division Two.[16] Peter Ward's 32 goals in 1976–77 helped return the team to the Second Division, and two years later, a 3–1 victory away at Newcastle United confirmed their promotion to the First Division.[17] In 1983, for the first time, they reached the FA Cup Final, in which they played Manchester United. The scores were level at 2–2 until the last moments of extra time, when Albion's Gordon Smith had a clear chance to score a winning goal. Peter Jones's radio commentary on the moment became famous: "and Smith must score...", he cried, just before Smith's shot was blocked by the goalkeeper's legs. Albion lost the replay 4–0,[18][19] and were relegated that same season.[4]

A sixth-place finish in 1990–91 qualified Albion for the playoffs; they beat Millwall in the semi-final, then lost 3–1 to Notts County in the final. The following season, when the newly formed FA Premier League split from the Football League, the remaining divisions of the Football League were renumbered upwards, and Albion were relegated from the "old" to the "new" Second Division.[4][20] Three years later, another relegation took Albion to the bottom tier of the Football League, and financial problems meant the Goldstone Ground would be sold. From October to the penultimate game of the 1996–97 season, Albion were bottom of the League,[16] their plight made worse by a two-point deduction for failure to control their protesting supporters,[21] and they went into the last game needing at least a draw at Hereford United to stay in the League and relegate their opponents to the Conference. After falling behind to an own goal, Robbie Reinelt equalised in the second half to secure their League status.[22] The club played two seasons at Gillingham, some 70 miles (110 km) from home, before returning to Brighton to the Withdean Stadium, a municipal athletics track, in 1999. Bobby Zamora's 28 League goals in each of two consecutive seasons helped his team to two successive divisional titles and promotion back to the second tier. Over the next nine seasons Albion suffered two relegations and two promotions, the first via the playoffs in 2004[23] and the second, as League One champions, coincident with the opening of the club's new stadium at Falmer in 2011.[23]

Key[edit]

Details for abandoned competitions – the 1938–39 Third Division South Cup and the 1939–40 Football League – are shown in italics and appropriately footnoted.

Seasons[edit]

Season Division[e] P W D L F A Pts Pos[f] FA Cup [2][g] League Cup[16][h] Competition Result Name Goals
League[4][27][28] Other[4][16][29] Top scorer[30][i]
1901–02 Southern 2 16 11 0 5 34 17 22 3rd QR3 &
&
McAvoy, FrankFrank McAvoy 9
1902–03
Southern 2 promoted

South Eastern
10

22
7

11
1

2
2

9
34

45
11

39
15

24

5th
QR4 &
&
Scott, FrankFrank Scott 31
1903–04 Southern 1 34 6 12 16 45 69 24 17th QR3 &
&
Roberts, BillyBilly Roberts 9
1904–05 Southern 1 34 13 6 15 44 45 32 11th IntR &
&
Gardner, AndyAndy Gardner 13
1905–06
Southern 1

United
34

18
9

6
7

4
18

8
30

28
55

28
25

16

7th
R2 &
&
Joynes, DickieDickie Joynes
Billy Yates
9
1906–07
Southern 1

United
38

14
18

6
9

6
11

2
53

33
43

26
45

18

2nd
R1 &
&
Hall, JackJack Hall 28
1907–08
Southern 1

Western 1A
38

12
12

6
8

2
18

4
46

19
59

19
32

14

3rd
R2 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] R2 Hall, JackJack Hall 26
1908–09
Southern 1

Western 1A
40

12
14

7
7

2
19

3
60

23
61

13
35

16

1st[l]
R1 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] F Martin, JackJack Martin 25
1909–10 Southern 1 42 23 13 6 69 28 59 1st R1 &


Jones, BulletBullet Jones 22
1910–11 Southern 1 38 20 8 10 58 35 48 3rd R2 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] F Jones, BulletBullet Jones 19
1911–12 Southern 1 38 19 9 10 73 35 47 5th R1 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] R2 Smith, JimmyJimmy Smith 27
1912–13
Southern 1

South Alliance
38

16
13

8
12

5
13

3
48

28
47

19
38

21
9th

2nd
R2 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] F Webb, CharlieCharlie Webb 13
1913–14
Southern 1

South Alliance
38

16
15

11
12

2
11

3
43

39
45

15
42

24

1st
R3 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] R1 Miller, BillBill Miller 20
1914–15 Southern 1 38 16 7 15 46 47 39 10th R2 &
Southern Charity Cup[k] R1 Jones, BulletBullet Jones 13
1915–19 é
The Football League and FA Cup were suspended until after the First World War. Albion played no part in the wartime competitions.
& & & & & & & é & & é & é &
1919–20 Southern 1 42 14 8 20 60 72 36 16th QR6 &
&
Doran, JackJack Doran 10
1920–21 Division 3[o] 42 14 8 20 42 61 36 18th R2 &
&
Doran, JackJack Doran 22
1921–22 Division 3S 42 13 9 20 45 51 35 19th R2 &
&
Doran, JackJack Doran 23
1922–23 Division 3S 42 20 11 11 52 34 51 4th R2 &
&
Fuller, EddieEddie Fuller 13
1923–24 Division 3S 42 21 9 12 68 37 51 5th R3 &
&
Cook, TommyTommy Cook 28
1924–25 Division 3S 42 19 8 15 59 45 46 8th R2 &
&
Cook, TommyTommy Cook 18
1925–26 Division 3S 42 19 9 14 84 73 47 5th R1 &
&
Jennings, SamSam Jennings 20
1926–27 Division 3S 42 21 11 10 79 50 53 4th R3 &
&
Jennings, SamSam Jennings 27
1927–28 Division 3S 42 19 10 13 81 69 48 4th R2 &
&
Cook, TommyTommy Cook 26
1928–29 Division 3S 42 16 6 20 58 76 38 15th R1 &
&
Kirkwood, DanDan Kirkwood 21
1929–30 Division 3S 42 21 8 13 87 63 50 5th R5 &
&
Vallance, HughHugh Vallance 32
1930–31 Division 3S 42 17 15 10 68 53 49 4th R4 &
&
Nicol, GeordieGeordie Nicol 19
1931–32 Division 3S 42 17 12 13 73 58 46 8th R3 &
&
Attwood, ArthurArthur Attwood 29
1932–33 Division 3S 42 17 8 17 66 65 42 12th R5 &
&
Attwood, ArthurArthur Attwood 35
1933–34 Division 3S 42 15 13 14 68 60 43 10th R4 &
Football League Third Division South Cup SF Brown, BusterBuster Brown 15
1934–35 Division 3S 42 17 9 16 69 62 43 9th R3 &
Football League Third Division South Cup R2 Brown, BusterBuster Brown 26
1935–36 Division 3S 42 18 8 16 70 63 44 7th R3 &
Football League Third Division South Cup QF Law, AlecAlec Law 27
1936–37 Division 3S 42 24 5 13 74 43 53 3rd R1 &
Football League Third Division South Cup R1 Stephens, BertBert Stephens 26
1937–38 Division 3S 42 21 9 12 64 44 51 5th R3 &
Football League Third Division South Cup R1 Davie, JockJock Davie 24
1938–39 Division 3S 42 19 11 12 68 49 49 3rd R1 &
Football League Third Division South Cup[p] R2 Stephens, BertBert Stephens 17
1939–40[q] Division 3S 3 1 2 0 5 4 4 5th &
&
&
Davie, JockJock Davie 2
1939–45 é
The Football League and FA Cup were suspended until after the Second World War.
& & & & & & & é & & é & é &
1945–46 é
R5[r] &
&
Davie, JockJock Davie[s] 10
1946–47 Division 3S 42 13 12 17 54 72 38 17th R1 &
&
Chapman, GeorgeGeorge Chapman 10
1947–48 Division 3S 42 11 12 19 43 73 34 22nd R3 &
&
James, TonyTony James 14
1948–49 Division 3S 42 15 18 9 55 55 48 6th R1 &
&
Tennant, DesDes Tennant 11
1949–50 Division 3S 42 16 12 14 57 69 44 8th R1 &
&
McNichol, JohnnyJohnny McNichol 9
1950–51 Division 3S 46 13 17 16 71 79 43 13th R4 &
&
McNichol, JohnnyJohnny McNichol 14
1951–52 Division 3S 46 24 10 12 87 63 58 5th R1 &
&
Bennett, KenKen Bennett
Billy Reed
19
1952–53 Division 3S 46 19 12 15 81 75 50 7th R3 &
&
Bennett, KenKen Bennett 13
1953–54 Division 3S 46 26 9 11 86 61 61 2nd R2 &
&
Addinall, BertBert Addinall 22
1954–55 Division 3S 46 20 10 16 76 63 50 6th R3 &
&
Mundy, AlbertAlbert Mundy 21
1955–56 Division 3S 46 29 7 10 112 50 65 2nd R2 &
&
Mundy, AlbertAlbert Mundy 28
1956–57 Division 3S 46 19 14 13 86 65 52 6th R1 &
&
Mundy, AlbertAlbert Mundy 20
1957–58 Division 3S promoted 46 24 12 10 88 64 60 1st R2 &
&
Harburn, PeterPeter Harburn
Dave Sexton
20
1958–59 Division 2 42 15 11 16 74 90 41 12th R3 &
&
Shepherd, JohnJohn Shepherd 17
1959–60 Division 2 42 13 12 17 67 76 38 14th R5 &
&
Curry, BillBill Curry 26
1960–61 Division 2 42 14 9 19 61 75 37 16th R4 R3 &
Thorne, AdrianAdrian Thorne 14
1961–62 Division 2 relegated 42 10 11 21 42 86 31 22nd R3 R1 &
Goodchild, JohnnyJohnny Goodchild
Bobby Laverick
Tony Nicholas
10
1962–63 Division 3 relegated 46 12 12 22 58 84 36 22nd R1 R2 &
Donnelly, PeterPeter Donnelly 11
1963–64 Division 4 46 19 12 15 71 52 50 8th R1 R2 &
Goodchild, JohnnyJohnny Goodchild 15
1964–65 Division 4 promoted 46 26 11 9 102 57 63 1st R1 R1 &
Gould, WallyWally Gould 21
1965–66 Division 3 46 16 11 19 67 65 43 15th R2 R2 &
Livesey, CharlieCharlie Livesey 14
1966–67 Division 3 46 13 15 18 61 71 41 19th R4 R4 &
Napier, KitKit Napier
Eric Whitington
10
1967–68 Division 3 46 16 16 14 57 55 48 10th R2 R2 &
Napier, KitKit Napier 28
1968–69 Division 3 46 16 13 17 72 65 45 12th R2 R2 &
Napier, KitKit Napier 18
1969–70 Division 3 46 23 9 14 57 43 55 5th R2 R3 &
Gilliver, AllanAllan Gilliver 16
1970–71 Division 3 46 14 16 16 50 47 44 14th R3 R1 &
Napier, KitKit Napier 13
1971–72 Division 3 promoted 46 27 11 8 82 47 65 2nd R2 R2 &
Napier, KitKit Napier 19
1972–73 Division 2 relegated 42 8 13 21 46 83 29 22nd R3 R2 &
Beamish, KenKen Beamish 10
1973–74 Division 3 46 16 11 19 52 58 43 19th R1 R1 &
Beamish, KenKen Beamish 12
1974–75 Division 3 46 16 10 20 56 64 42 19th R3 R1 &
Binney, FredFred Binney 13
1975–76 Division 3 46 22 9 15 78 53 53 4th R3 R1 &
Binney, FredFred Binney 27
1976–77 Division 3 promoted 46 25 11 10 83 40 61 2nd R1 R4 &
Ward, PeterPeter Ward[t] 36 ♦
1977–78 Division 2 42 22 12 8 63 38 56 4th R4 R2 &
Ward, PeterPeter Ward 17
1978–79 Division 2 promoted 42 23 10 9 72 39 56 2nd[u] R3 QF &
Ward, PeterPeter Ward 13
1979–80 Division 1 42 11 15 16 47 57 37 16th R4 R4 &
Ward, PeterPeter Ward 18
1980–81 Division 1 42 14 7 21 54 67 35 19th R3 R3 &
Robinson, MichaelMichael Robinson 22
1981–82 Division 1 42 13 13 16 43 52 52[v] 13th[w] R4 R3 &
Ritchie, AndyAndy Ritchie 14
1982–83 Division 1 relegated 42 9 13 20 38 68 40 22nd F[x] R2 &
Robinson, MichaelMichael Robinson 10
1983–84 Division 2 42 17 9 16 69 60 60 9th R5 R3 &
Connor, TerryTerry Connor 17
1984–85 Division 2 42 20 12 10 54 34 72 6th R4 R2 &
Connor, TerryTerry Connor 16
1985–86 Division 2 42 16 9 17 64 62 57 10th R6 R3 &
Saunders, DeanDean Saunders 19
1986–87 Division 2 relegated 42 9 12 21 37 54 39 22nd R3 R2 &
Connor, TerryTerry Connor 9
1987–88 Division 3 promoted 46 23 15 8 69 47 84 2nd R4 R1 Associate Members Cup SF(S) Nelson, GarryGarry Nelson 32
1988–89 Division 2 46 14 9 23 57 66 51 19th R3 R1 &
Nelson, GarryGarry Nelson 16
1989–90 Division 2 46 15 9 22 56 72 54 18th R4 R1 &
Bremner, KevinKevin Bremner 12
1990–91 Division 2 46 21 7 18 63 69 70 6th[y] R4 R1 &
Small, MikeMike Small 21
1991–92 Division 2[z] relegated 46 12 11 23 56 77 47 23rd R4 R2 &
Gall, MarkMark Gall 14
1992–93 Division 2 46 20 9 17 63 59 69 9th R4 R2 Associate Members Cup QF(S) Nogan, KurtKurt Nogan 22
1993–94 Division 2 46 15 14 17 60 67 59 14th R1 R2 Associate Members Cup Grp Nogan, KurtKurt Nogan 26
1994–95 Division 2 46 14 17 15 54 53 56 16th R1 R3 Associate Members Cup Grp McDougald, JuniorJunior McDougald 13
1995–96 Division 2 relegated 46 10 10 26 46 69 40 23rd R2 R1 Associate Members Cup QF(S) McDougald, JuniorJunior McDougald 9
1996–97 Division 3 46 13 10 23 53 70 47[aa] 23rd R1 R1 Associate Members Cup R2 Maskell, CraigCraig Maskell 16
1997–98 Division 3 46 6 17 23 38 66 35 23rd R1 R1 Associate Members Cup R2 Minton, JeffJeff Minton 7
1998–99 Division 3 46 16 7 23 49 66 55 17th R1 R1 Associate Members Cup R2 Barker, RichieRichie Barker
Gary Hart
12
1999–2000 Division 3 46 17 16 13 64 46 67 11th R2 R1 Associate Members Cup R2 Freeman, DarrenDarren Freeman 13
2000–01 Division 3 promoted 46 28 8 10 73 35 92 1st R2 R1 Football League Trophy R2 Zamora, BobbyBobby Zamora[ab] 31 ♦
2001–02 Division 2 promoted 46 25 15 6 66 42 90 1st R3 R2 Football League Trophy QF(S) Zamora, BobbyBobby Zamora[ac] 32 ♦
2002–03 Division 1 relegated 46 11 12 23 49 67 45 23rd R3 R2 &
Zamora, BobbyBobby Zamora 14
2003–04 Division 2 promoted 46 22 11 13 64 43 77 4th[ad] R1 R2 Football League Trophy QF(S) Knight, LeonLeon Knight[ae] 27 ♦
2004–05 Championship 46 13 12 21 40 65 51 20th R3 R1 &
Virgo, AdamAdam Virgo 8
2005–06 Championship relegated 46 7 17 22 39 71 38 24th R3 R1 &
Kazim-Richards, ColinColin Kazim-Richards 6
2006–07 League One 46 14 11 21 49 58 53 18th R3 R2 Football League Trophy SF(S) Robinson, JakeJake Robinson 12
2007–08 League One 46 19 12 15 58 50 69 7th R3 R1 Football League Trophy SF(S) Forster, NickyNicky Forster 19
2008–09 League One 46 13 13 20 55 70 52 16th R1 R3 Football League Trophy F(S) Forster, NickyNicky Forster 16
2009–10 League One 46 15 14 17 56 60 59 13th R4 R1 Football League Trophy R2 Forster, NickyNicky Forster 16
2010–11 League One promoted 46 28 11 7 85 40 95 1st R5 R1 Football League Trophy R1 Murray, GlennGlenn Murray 22
2011–12 Championship 46 17 15 14 52 52 66 10th R5 R3 &
Barnes, AshleyAshley Barnes 14
2012–13 Championship 46 19 18 9 69 43 75 4th[af] R4 R1 &
Mackail-Smith, CraigCraig Mackail-Smith 11

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The South-Eastern League, founded in 1901, consisted of a mixture of amateur teams and reserve teams of Southern League clubs in London and the south-east of England. Albion fielded a first team in the competition in the 1902–03 season, and a reserve team thereafter.[24]
  2. ^ The Southern Football Alliance was a midweek league whose rules required at least seven first-team players in the starting eleven. It proved a financial failure, so Brighton & Hove Albion withdrew from the league after two seasons, despite the on-field success enjoyed by their first eleven.[25]
  3. ^ One of several short-lived leagues of this name, this incarnation of the United League was founded in 1905 as a secondary competition for Southern League clubs. Albion played in the competition in its first two seasons.[24]
  4. ^ The Western League was formed in 1892 in the Bristol area, but expanded to include Southern League teams using it as a secondary competition. Albion played in the competition for two seasons, until the Southern League teams withdrew because of the travelling involved.[24]
  5. ^ Divisions are sorted according to their level within the English football league system at the time.
  6. ^ In seasons when the club played in more than one league, the column is sorted on the Southern League position.
  7. ^ Beginning with the 1925–26 season, the FA Cup was structured so that the third round proper contained 64 teams. Prior to that date, the structure had varied, so rounds are not directly comparable to the round of the same name after 1925. For example, in 1901–02, when Albion first entered the competition, there were only three rounds proper before the semifinal, as compared with the current six.[2][26]
  8. ^ The Football League Cup competition started in the 1960–61 season.[20]
  9. ^ Includes goals scored in all first-team competitions, i.e. the Football League, FA Cup, League Cup, Full Members Cup, Associate Members Cup / Football League Trophy, Third Division South Cup, Southern League and promotion test match, FA Charity Shield, South-Eastern League (1902–03 season), United League (1905–06 and 1906–07), Western Football League (1907–08 and 1908–09) and championship match, Southern Football Alliance (1912–13 and 1913–14) and Southern Professional Charity Cup.[31]
  10. ^ Runners-up on goal average for the Southern League Second Division title, Albion were promoted to the Southern League First Division by winning 5–3 in a test match against Watford, who had finished second bottom in the First Division.[4][32]
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h The Southern Professional Charity Cup was open to any professional club in London and the South-East of England and ran from 1901 until 1915. The majority of Southern League clubs participated.[33]
  12. ^ Won Division 1A of the Western League, but lost 2–1 in a playoff against Millwall, winners of Division 1B, for the overall title.[4]
  13. ^ As reigning Southern League champions, Albion played Football League champions Aston Villa in the 1910 FA Charity Shield. At Stamford Bridge, London, Albion won 1–0, the goal coming from Charlie Webb.[8]
  14. ^ Beat Watford 1–0 in the final at Stamford Bridge, the goal scored by Bullet Jones.[34]
  15. ^ In 1920, the Football League formed a third division comprising most of the Southern League First Division clubs.[20]
  16. ^ Although the 1938–39 Third Division South Cup was never completed, Brighton & Hove Albion do include their match in this season's competition in their player statistics.[31][35]
  17. ^ When the Second World War began, the 1939–40 Football League season was abandoned with three matches played and Brighton in 5th position.[36]
  18. ^ Although the Football League did not resume until the 1946–47 season, the FA Cup was contested in 1945–46. From the first round proper to the sixth round (quarter-final), results were determined on aggregate score over two legs.[2]
  19. ^ Goals scored in FA Cup competition only.
  20. ^ Ward scored 32 goals in the Third Division.[37]
  21. ^ Promoted to the top division of English football for the first time.
  22. ^ The 1981–82 season saw the introduction of three points for a win instead of two.[20]
  23. ^ Club's best Football League finishing position.
  24. ^ Albion drew 2–2 with Manchester United at Wembley Stadium, losing 4–0 in the replay.[4]
  25. ^ Lost 3–1 to Notts County in the playoff final after beating Millwall 6–2 on aggregate in the semi-finals.[4]
  26. ^ When the newly formed FA Premier League split from the Football League, the remaining divisions of the Football League were renumbered upwards, so Brighton were relegated from the "old" Second Division into the "new" Second Division.[20]
  27. ^ Two points deducted as punishment for failure to control spectators.[21]
  28. ^ Zamora scored 28 goals in Division Three.[37]
  29. ^ Zamora scored 28 goals in Division Two.[37]
  30. ^ Promoted via the playoffs: beat Swindon Town in the semi-final after a penalty shootout, then beat Bristol City 1–0 in the playoff final with a late penalty scored by Leon Knight.[23]
  31. ^ Knight scored 25 goals in Division Two. This figure excludes Knight's goal in the playoff final: statistical sources, e.g. Sky Sports Football Yearbook (formerly Rothmans Football Yearbook), restrict league goals to those scored during the regular season.[37][38]
  32. ^ Lost in the play-off semifinal to Crystal Palace on aggregate.[39]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Camillin, Paul & Weir, Stewart (2001). Albion – The first 100 years. Brighton: Pavilion. ISBN 0-9532045-0-2. 
  • Carder, Tim & Harris, Roger (1997). Albion A–Z: A Who's Who of Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Hove: Goldstone Books. ISBN 0-9521337-1-7. 
  • Carder, Tim & Harris, Roger (1993). Seagulls! The Story of Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Hove: Goldstone Books. ISBN 0-9521337-0-9. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Camillin & Weir, pp. 4–5.
  2. ^ a b c d "Past Results". The Football Association (The FA). Retrieved 20 May 2013.  Individual seasons accessed via dropdown menu.
  3. ^ Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, pp. 31–32.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Brighton & Hove Albion". Football Club History Database. Richard Rundle. Retrieved 26 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "Albion History: 1900s". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 22 February 2002. 
  6. ^ Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, pp. 40–41.
  7. ^ "Association Football. The League Championship.". The Times. 2 May 1910. p. 2. 
  8. ^ a b Camillin, Paul (6 September 2010). "Champions of England". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 10 September 2010. 
  9. ^ "Time to honour one of Albion's all-time greats". The Argus (Brighton). 15 April 2001. Retrieved 20 September 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Albion History: 1920s". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 13 August 2002. 
  11. ^ "The Corinthians Beaten. Great Cup-Tie Effort. 45,000 People At Chelsea". The Times. 23 January 1923. p. 10. 
  12. ^ "Albion History: 1930s". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 13 August 2002. 
  13. ^ "Albion History: 1940s". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 13 August 2002. 
  14. ^ "Albion History: 1950s". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 13 August 2002. 
  15. ^ Camillin & Weir, p. 69.
  16. ^ a b c d "Brighton and Hove Albion 1904–1905 : Results". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 20 May 2013.  Other seasons accessed via dropdown menu.
  17. ^ "Albion History: 1970s". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Archived from the original on 13 August 2002. 
  18. ^ Shaw, Phil (28 November 1996). "The Wembley miss that has become a myth". The Independent. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  19. ^ Tyldesley, Clive (16 April 2011). "How to commentate on the FA Cup". Mirror Football (Trinity Mirror). Retrieved 16 December 2011. "The most memorable bit of FA Cup commentary, and it was on radio, was the late and great Peter Jones' "And Smith must score" as Gordon Smith shot for little Brighton against Manchester United in 1984. It was almost a plea on behalf of the underdog, and the fact that even the great Peter Jones got carried away tells you something about the magic of the Cup. It doesn’t matter that he got it wrong, it was magical." 
  20. ^ a b c d e "History Of The Football League". The Football League. 22 September 2010. Archived from the original on 2 February 2013. 
  21. ^ a b Staniforth, Tommy (10 December 1996). "Brighton have two points deducted". The Independent. Retrieved 4 December 2011. 
  22. ^ Hey, Stan (4 May 1997). "Brighton give thanks to true Gritt". The Independent. Retrieved 4 December 2011. 
  23. ^ a b c "Bristol City 0–1 Brighton". ESPN FC. 30 May 2004. Retrieved 20 September 2013. 
  24. ^ a b c Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, p. 326.
  25. ^ Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, pp. 60, 65.
  26. ^ Barber, David (12 January 2011). "Four replays". The Football Association. Retrieved 20 September 2013. 
  27. ^ "Brighton and Hove Albion 1920–1921 : English Division Three (South) Table". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 3 December 2011.  Other seasons accessed via dropdown menu.
  28. ^ Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, pp. 32, 41, 44, 60, 65.
  29. ^ For Southern Professional Charity Cup: Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, pp. 49–66.
  30. ^ For seasons up to and including 1996–97, except 1945–46: Carder & Harris, Albion A–Z, p. 338.
    For the 1945–46 FA Cup season: Rollin, Jack (2005). Soccer At War 1939–45. London: Headline. p. 294. ISBN 978-0-7553-1431-7. 
    For seasons from 1997–98 onwards: "Player Appearances". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 20 May 2013.  Access season required via dropdown menu.
  31. ^ a b Carder & Harris, Albion A–Z, p. 12.
  32. ^ "Watford". Football Club History Database. Richard Rundle. Retrieved 4 December 2011. 
  33. ^ Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, p. 54.
  34. ^ Carder & Harris, Seagulls!, p. 56.
  35. ^ "English Division Three South Cup 1938–1939 : Results". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  36. ^ Felton, Paul. "Season 1939–40 (Abandoned)". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation (RSSSF). Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  37. ^ a b c d Ross, James M. (12 June 2009). "English League Leading Goalscorers". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation (RSSSF). Retrieved 6 December 2011. 
  38. ^ Rollin, Glenda & Rollin, Jack, eds. (2010). Sky Sports Football Yearbook 2010–2011. Headline. p. 40. ISBN 978-0-7553-6107-6. 
  39. ^ Szczepanik, Nick (14 May 2013). "Brighton 0 Crystal Palace 2 match report: Wilfried Zaha double puts Ian Holloway back on road to Wembley". The Independent. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 

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