List of British divisions in World War II

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This page is a list of British Army divisions that existed in World War II.

African[edit]

  • 1st (African) Division – renamed 11th (African) Division – Formed 24 July 1940 in East Africa. 24 November 1940 redesignated 11th (African) Division. Served in East Africa from July 1940 until February 1941 and from August 1941 until November 1941, Italian Somaliland from February 1941 until March 1941, and in Abyssinia from March 1941 until August 1941. Fought at The Juba. 23 November 1941 disbanded in East Africa.
  • 2nd (African) Division – renamed 12th (African) Division and also known as the "12th (East Africa) Division" (after West African elements reassigned in late 1941) – Formed 19 July 1940 in East Africa. 24 November 1940 redesignated 12th (African) Division. Served in East Africa from July 1940 until February 1941, Italian Somaliland from February 1941 until April 1941, and in Abyssinia from April 1941 until April 1943. Fought at The Juba and Gondar. 18 April 1943 disbanded in East Africa.
  • 11th (East Africa) Division – Formed 15 February 1943 in East Africa. Served in East Africa from February 1943 until June 1943, Ceylon from June 1943 until May 1944, Burma from June 1944 until April 1945, and India from April 1945 until the end of the war. Fought in Burma. Ended the war under command of GHQ India.
  • 81st (West Africa) Division – Formed 1 March 1943 in Nigeria as the 1st (West Africa) Division, redesignated the 81st (West Africa) Division three days later. Served in West Africa from March 1943 until July 1943, India from August 1943 until December 1943 and from March 1945 until August 1945, and Burma from December 1943 until March 1945. Fought at North Arakan and on the Arakan Beaches. Ended the war under command of Southern Army.
  • 82nd (West Africa) Division – Formed 1 August 1943 in Nigeria. Served in West Africa from August 1943 until May 1944, India from July 1944 until November 1944, and in Burma from November 1944 until August 1945. Fought on the Arakan Beaches. Ended the war under command of HQ Allied Land Forces South East Asia.

Airborne[edit]

  • 1st Airborne Division – Formed 4 November 1941 in the UK. Served in North Africa from April 1943 until July 1943, Sicily in July 1943 until September 1943, Italy from September 1943 until November 1943, northwestern Europe (Arnhem) in September 1944, and after the end of the campaign in Norway. Fought in Sicily and at Arnhem. Ended the war in Europe under command of Force 134 (Norway).
  • 6th Airborne Division – Formed 3 May 1943 in the UK. Served in northwestern Europe June 1944 (landed at Normandy on D-Day) until September 1944, December 1944 until February 1945, and March 1945 until May 1945. Fought in Normandy and near Wesel. Met Soviet forces at Wismar on the Baltic Sea. Ended the war in Europe under command of U.S. XVIII Airborne Corps.

Anti-Aircraft[edit]

The following AA Divisions existed during the early years of World War II.[1][2][3] All AA Divisions were disbanded on 30 September 1942 and replaced by AA Groups.[1]

Armoured[edit]

The division was formed on 17 June 1941, in the United Kingdom. On 12 June 1945, the division was reorganised as the Guards Division.[5] The division served in North West Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war. The Guards took part in the Battle of Normandy, initially having a minor role in Operation Epsom,[6] before taking on much larger roles in Operation Goodwood, and Operation Bluecoat.[7] In September 1944, the division played a prominent role in Operation Market Garden.[8] Afterwards, the division took part in the battles for the Rhineland, the crossing of the Rhine, and the advance to the Elbe.[9] Ended war under command of XXX Corps.[5]
The division was founded in 1937.[11] The division briefly served in France during 1940,[9] from November 1941 until 1944 the division served in the Western Desert and Tunisia, taking part in the battles of Gazala, and the First and Second Battle of El Alamein.[9][12] On 27 May 1944, the division was transferred to Italy, were it fought until 28 October when it ceased operations.[13] On 11 January 1945, the division was disbanded in Italy.[10]
The division was formed on 15 December 1939, in the United Kingdom. In October 1940, the division was dispatched to Egypt and arrived in January 1941.[14] The division was used to reinforce the 7th Armoured Division, while elements were shipped to Greece. This left an under strength, inexperienced, and ill-equipped division, which was overrun during Rommel's first offensive.[15] The divisional headquarters was captured on 8 April, and on 10 May 1941 the division was formally disbanded.[14]
The division was formed on 12 September 1940, in the United Kingdom.[16] The division first saw service in North Africa from November 1942[17] – where "it was among the first to reach Tunisia as part of First Army[18] – till March 1944, when it was then deployed to Italy. The division fought at Bou Arada, Fondouk, El Kourzia, Tunis, the Liri Valley, Arezzo, Florence, along the Gothic Line, and in the Argenta Gap.[16] Ended war under command of V Corps.[17]
The division was initially formed, in Egypt during the autumn of 1938, as the Mobile Division (Egypt).[20] At the outbreak of the Second World War, the division was redesignated The Armoured Division (Egypt), before finally being called the 7th Armoured Division on 16 February 1940.[19] The division served in the Western Desert and North Africa from the outbreak of the war until September 1943 when it was shipped to Italy. After three months of fighting in Italy,[21] the division was returned to the United Kingdom for the upcoming Battle of Normandy.[22] The division then fought in North West Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war.[21] The division fought in every major battle of the Western Desert Campaign – including Operation Compass and the Second Battle of El Alamein – and took part in the Tunisian campaign.[22] The division fought in the Battle of Normandy (in particular at the Battle of Villers-Bocage), helped in the liberation of the Low Countries, and crossed the Rhine into Germany.[22] Ended war under command of XII Corps.[21]
The division was formed on 4 November 1940, in the United Kingdom. In July 1942 the division was deployed to Egypt, however it never operated as a complete formation during the following six months and was disbanded on 1 January 1943.[23]
The division was formed in the United Kingdom on 1 December 1940. It was never deployed overseas and was disbanded on 31 July 1944.[24]
The division was formed in Palestine, on 1 August 1941, by the redesignation and reorganisation of the 1st Cavalry Division.[25] In April 1942 the division moved to Egypt and later took part in the battles of Alam el Halfa and the Second Battle of El Alamein. In January 1943 the division moved back to Palestine, then on to Syria, before returning to Egypt in September.[26] The division stayed in Egypt until it was disbanded on 15 June 1944.[25]
The division was formed in the United Kingdom, on 9 March 1941.[27] The division was deployed to Normandy in June 1944, playing a prominent role in Operation Epsom.[28] The division would spearhead Operation Goodwood,[29] and take part in Operation Bluecoat.[30] It later liberated Antwerp, helped clear the Low Countries, and took part in Operation Veritable.[22] Ended war under command of VIII Corps.[27]
The division was formed on 1 November 1941, in the United Kingdom, by conversion of the 42nd (East Lancashire) Infantry Division. The division was never deployed overseas and was disbanded on 17 October 1943.[31]
The division was formed in the United Kingdom on 13 August 1942.[32] In April 1943, the division was reorganised as an administrative formation for the development and useage of specialist vehicles ("Hobart's Funnies"). In this role it never acted as a division.[33][34] Depending on the needs of any particular battle, the division would allocate squadrons, regiments, or brigades to other formations to provide support. The 'division' operated throughout the 1944–45 North West Europe campaign.[35] Ended war under command of 21st Army Group.[32]

Cavalry[edit]

The division was formed in the United Kingdom, on 31 October 1939. It was then deployed to Palestine, arriving in January 1940. Elements of the division formed Habforce, and took part in the Anglo-Iraqi War and the Syria–Lebanon Campaign. On 1 August 1941, the division was reorganised into the 10th Armoured Division.[36]

County[edit]

Formed in the United Kingdom on 28 February 1941. On 1 December 1941, the division was redesignated the 77th Infantry Division.[37]
The division was formed in the United Kingdom on 24 February 1941, but had no troops assigned to it until 24 April 1941. On 24 November 1941, the division ceased to function and was formally disbanded on 31 December.[38]
The division was formed on 12 March 1941, in the United Kingdom. On 1 December 1941, it was redesignated Durham and North Riding Coastal Area, and ceased to act as a division.[39]
The division was formed on 18 February 1941, in the United Kingdom, by the redesignation of the West Sussex County Division. On 7 October 1941, the division was disbanded.[40]
The division was formed on 28 February 1941, in the United Kingdom, by the redesignation of 'Hampire Area'. On 25 November 1941, the division ceased to function and was formally disbanded on 31 December 1941.[41]
The division was formed on 24 February 1941, in the United Kingdom, but did not become operational until 27 March 1941. On 25 November 1941, the division ceased to function and was disbanded on 3 December.[42]
The division was formed on 24 December 1940, in the United Kingdom. On 18 November 1941, it was redesignated the 76th Infantry Division.[43]
The division was formed on 24 February 1941, in the United Kingdom. On 1 December 1941, the division ceased to function and on 21 December it was disbanded.[44]
The division was formed on 9 November 1940, in the United Kingdom, by the redesignation of 'Brocforce'. On 18 February 1941, the division was redesignated the Essex County Division.[45]
The division was formed on 24 February 1941, in the United Kingdom, but only became operational on 19 March 1941. On 1 December 1941, the division was redesignated 'East Riding District' and ceased to exist.[46]

Deception[edit]

Indian[edit]

For British Indian Army units, see List of Indian divisions in World War II

Infantry[edit]

The division was formed in North West Europe on 12 June 1945, following the reorganisation of the Guards Armoured Division.[49]
Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at Aldershot. Served in France from September 1939 until June 1940, North Africa from March 1943 to December 1943, Italy from December 1943 until January 1945, and in Palestine for most of 1945. Fought at the Medjez Plain, Tunis, Anzio, Rome, and on the Gothic Line. Ended war under HQ, Palestine and Transjordan command.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Finsbury Barracks. Organized as a motor division. 18 November 1940 redesignated 56th (London) Division.
Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at in Aldershot. Served in France from September 1939 until May 1940, India from June 1942 until April 1944 and April 1945 until August 1945, and in Burma from April 1944 until April 1945. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée, Kohima, and Mandalay. Ended war under command of the Southern Army (part of GHQ India).
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in the London District. Remained in the UK until 1 September 1944, when redesignated the 47th Infantry (Reserve) Division.
Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at in Bulford. Served in France from September 1939 until June 1940, and in northwestern Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought at Ypres-Comines Canal, assaulted Normandy, Caen, Bourguebus Ridge, Mont Pincon, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine River. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of I Corps.
Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at Colchester. Served in France from October 1939 until June 1940, in North Africa from March 1943 until December 1943, in Egypt from December 1943 until February 1944, in Italy from February 1944 until December 1944, and in Greece from December 1944 until the end of the war. Fought at Oued Zarga, the Medjez Plain, Tunis, Cassino, on the Trasimene Line, Arezzo, Florence, and on the Rimini Line. Ended the war under command of HQ Land Forces (Greece).
Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at Catterick Camp. Served in France from December 1939 until June 1940, in India from May 1942 until August 1942, in Iraq from August 1942 until September 1942, in Persia from September 1942 until January 1943, in Syria February 1943 until June 1943, in Egypt June 1943, in Sicily July 1943 until September 1943, in Italy September 1943 until July 1944, in Palestine July 1944 until February 1945, and in northwestern Europe from March 1945 until the end of the war. Fought at Ypres-Comines Canal, assaulted Sicily, on the Sangro River, on the Garigliano River, Anzio, and Rome. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under the command of VIII Corps.
Formed November 1939 in Egypt by redesignation of the 7th Infantry Division. 10 October 1941 redesignated 70th Infantry Division. 24 November 1943 disbanded in India. Served in Egypt from November 1939 until March 1940, February 1941 until June 1941, and December 1941 until February 1942, in Palestine March 1940 until June 1940, in Syria June 1941 until October 1941, in Libya October 1941 until December 1941, and in India from March 1942 until October 1943. Fought at Damascus and Tobruk. Under command of Central Army (part of GHQ India) when inactivated.
Existing division at the start of the war in Palestine, headquarters underway to Mersa Matruh. 3 November 1939 redesignated 6th Infantry Division.
Existing division at the start of the war, stationed in Palestine. 28 February 1940 disbanded in Palestine, while under command of HQ Palestine and Transjordan.
2 June 1942 8th Division HQ formed to control administrative units in Syria; disbanded 31 October 1943 in Syria.
Formed September 1939 in the UK. 7 August 1940 redesignated 51st (Highland) Infantry Division.
Formed 10 October 1939 in the UK. Served in France from April 1940 until June 1940. 11 July 1940 disbanded in the UK.
Formed 11 July 1942 in the Sudan, from the 1st Sudan Defence Force Brigade. 12 January 1945 redesignated Sudan Defence Force Group (North Africa).
Formed September 1939 in the UK. Served in northwestern Europe from 14 June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought on the Odon River, at Caen, Mont Pincon, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of VIII Corps.
Formed 30 September 1939 in the UK. Served in India January 1942 and in Malaya February 1942. 15 February 1942 captured by the Japanese Army in Malaya. Fought on Singapore Island.
Formed 2 October 1939 in the UK. Served in France from April 1940 until June 1940. 30 June 1940 disbanded in the UK.
Formed 1 September 1944 in Burma by redesignation of the 36th Indian Infantry Division. Served in Burma from September 1944 until May 1945, and in India from May 1945 until the end of the war. Fought at Mandalay and along the Rangoon Road. Under command of Southern Army (part of GHQ India) at the end of the war.
Formed September 1939 in the UK 1 September 1944 redesignated 38th Infantry (Reserve) Division. Ended the war in Europe under the command of Western Command.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Manchester. Served in Belgium and France from April 1940 until June 1940. 1 November 1941 redesignated 42nd Armoured Division.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Salisbury. Served in northwestern Europe from 24 June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought on the Odon River, at Caen, Bourguebus Ridge, Mont Pincon, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XXX Corps.
  • 44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division[71] – Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Royal Artillery Barracks, Woolwich. Served in France and Belgium from April 1940 until June 1940, and in Egypt from July 1942 until January 1943. 31 December 1943 disbanded in the Middle East. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée, Alam el Halfa, and El Alamein.
  • 45th Infantry Division[72]
Formed September 1939 in the UK. August 1944 division dispersed. 1 September 1944 Redesignated 45th (Holding) Division. 1 December 1944 redesignated 45th Division. Under War Office Control at the end of the war.
Formed 2 October 1939 in the UK. Served in France and Belgium from April 1940 until June 1940, North Africa from January 1943 until September 1943, Italy from September 1943 until March 1944, July 1944 until January 1945 and April 1945 until May 1945, Egypt in March 1944 and June 1944, Palestine from April 1944 until June 1944, Greece from January 1945 until April 1945, and in Austria as an occupation force. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée, El Kouriza, Tunis, Salerno, Naples, on the Volturno River, Monte Camino, on the Gothic Line, Coriano, on the Rimini Line, and on the Lamone River. Ended the war in Europe under command of V Corps.
Formed 21 November 1940 in the UK by redesignation of the 2nd London Division. August 1944 division dispersed. 1 September 1944 redesignated 47th Infantry (Reserve) Division.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Oxford. Served in France and Belgium from January 1940 until June 1940. 20 December 1942 redesignated 48th Infantry (Reserve) Division. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Clifton, York. 5 April 1940 disbanded in the UK 10 June 1940 reconstituted in the UK. Served in northwestern Europe from 12 June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought on the Odon River and in the Scheldt Estuary. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under the command of I Canadian Corps.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Darlington. Organized as a motor division. Served in France and Belgium from January 1940 until June 1940, Egypt from June 1941 until July 1941, February 1942, from June 1942 until December 1942, and from May 1943 until September 1943, Cyprus from July 1941 until November 1941, Syria from January 1942 until February 1942, Libya from February 1942 until June 1942, from December 1943 until March 1943, and from April 1943 until May 1943, North Africa from March 1943 until April 1943, Sicily from July 1943 until October 1943, and northwestern Europe from June 1944 until December 1944. 16 December 1944 redesignated an Infantry (Reserve) Division in the UK. August 1945 arrived in Norway and retitled HQ British Land Forces Norway. Fought at Ypres-Comines Canal, Gazala, Mersa Matruh, El Alamein, Mareth, Akarit, Enfidaville, assaulted Sicily, assaulted Normandy, and in the Nederrijn.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Cragie, Perth. Served in France from 24 January 1940 until June 1940. 12 June 1940 captured at Saint-Valery-en-Caux. 7 August 1940 reconstituted by redesignation of the 9th (Highland) Infantry Division. Served in Egypt from August 1942 until November 1942, Libya from November 1942 until February 1943, North Africa from February 1943 until July 1943, and northwestern Europe from June 1944 until the end of the campaign in northwestern Europe. Fought at El Alamein, Medenine, Mareth, Akarit, Enfidaville, Tunis, assaulted Sicily, Adrano, Bourguebus Ridge, Falaise, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XXX Corps.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Glasgow. Trained at various times as both a mountain and airlanding division, but never used in either role. Served in France June 1940 and in northwestern Europe from October 1944 until the end of the war in Europe. Fought in the Scheldt Estuary, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XXX Corps.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Shrewsbury. Served in northwestern Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war in Europe. Fought on the Odon River, at Caen, Mont Pincon, Falaise, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XII Corps.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in The Barracks, Hertford. 14 December 1943 disbanded in the UK.
Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Liverpool. Never left the UK. Ended the war under command of Western Command.
Formed 18 November 1940 by redesignation of the 1st London Division. Served in Iraq from November 1942 until March 1943, Palestine in March 1943, Egypt from March 1943 until April 1943 and from April 1944 until July 1944, Libya in April 1943 and from May 1943 until August 1943, and in Italy from September 1943 until March 1944 and from July 1944 until the end of the war in Europe. Fought at Enfidaville, Tunis, Salerno, Naples, on the Volturno River, Monte Camino, on the Garigliano River, Anzio, on the Gothic Line, Coriano, on the Rimini Line, on the Lamone River, and in the Argenta Gap. Ended the war in Europe under command of XIII Corps.
Formed 4 September 1939 in the UK. Fought at Caen and Mount Pincon. Served in northwestern Europe from June 1944 until October 1944. 19 October 1944 disbanded in northwestern Europe.
Formed September 1939 in the UK. Never left the UK. Ended the war under command of Eastern Command.
Formed September 1939 in the UK 22 June 1940 disbanded in the UK.
Formed 10 October 1941 by redesignation of the 6th Infantry Division. 10 October 1941 redesignated 70th Infantry Division. 24 November 1943 disbanded in India. Served in Egypt from November 1939 until March 1940, February 1941 until June 1941, and December 1941 until February 1942, in Palestine March 1940 until June 1940, in Syria June 1941 until October 1941, in Libya October 1941 until December 1941, and in India from March 1942 until October 1943. Under command of Central Army (part of GHQ India) when inactivated. 24 November 1943 disbanded in India.
Formed 18 November 1941 by redesignation of the Norfolk County Division in the UK 20 December 1942 redesignated 76th Infantry (Reserve) Division in the UK. 1 September 1944 disbanded in the UK.
Formed 1 December 1941 by redesignation of the Devon and Cornwall County Division in the UK 20 December 1942 redesignated 77th Infantry (Reserve) Division in the UK 1 September 1944 disbanded in the UK.
Formed 25 May 1942 in the UK to take part in Operation Torch. Served in North Africa from November 1942 until July 1943, Sicily from July 1943 until September 1943, Italy from September 1943 until July 1944 when it was sent to Egypt for rest and regrouping. It rejoined the campaign in Italy in September 1944 remaining until the end of hostilities there in early May 1945. Ended the war in Austria under command of V Corps. Fought in Tunisia at Tebourba Gap, Oued Zarga, Medjez Plain, Tunis; in Sicily at Adrano and Centuripe; and in Italy at Termoli, on the Sangro River, Cassino, in the Liri Valley, on the Trasimene Line, Florence (Gothic Line), on the Senio River, and in the Argenta Gap.
Formed 1 January 1943 in the UK 1 September 1944 disbanded in the UK

Other[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b London Gazette
  2. ^ Orbat 3 September 1939
  3. ^ "United Kingdom: Autumn 1940". The Royal Artillery 1939–45. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  4. ^ Formation dates for AA divisions from Bellis, p. 71
  5. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 11
  6. ^ Jackson, p. 40
  7. ^ Buckley, pp. 33, 39
  8. ^ Buckingham, p. 116
  9. ^ a b c Fraser, p. 400
  10. ^ a b Joslen, p .13
  11. ^ Perry, p. 45
  12. ^ Joslen, p. 15
  13. ^ Joslen, p. 13, 15
  14. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 16
  15. ^ Playfair (1956), pp. 2–5
  16. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 17
  17. ^ a b Joslen, p. 18
  18. ^ Fraser, p. 400-401
  19. ^ a b Joslen, p. 19
  20. ^ Carter, p. 11
  21. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 20
  22. ^ a b c d Fraser, p. 401
  23. ^ a b Joslen, p. 22
  24. ^ a b Joslen, p. 23
  25. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 25
  26. ^ Joslen, p. 26
  27. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 27
  28. ^ Jackson, pp. 29, 30–31
  29. ^ Trew, p. 70
  30. ^ Buckley, p. 39
  31. ^ a b Joslen, p. 29
  32. ^ a b c Joslen, p. 30
  33. ^ Joslen, pp. 30, 32
  34. ^ Buckley, p. 13
  35. ^ Fraser, p. 402
  36. ^ a b Joslen, p. 33
  37. ^ a b Joslen, p. 108
  38. ^ a b Joslen, p. 109
  39. ^ a b Joslen, p. 110
  40. ^ a b Joslen, p. 111
  41. ^ a b Joslen, p. 112
  42. ^ a b Joslen, p. 113
  43. ^ a b Joslen, p. 114
  44. ^ a b Joslen, p. 115
  45. ^ a b Joslen, p. 116
  46. ^ a b Joslen, p. 117
  47. ^ Holt, The Deceivers
  48. ^ Joslen, pp. 92, 287.
  49. ^ a b Joslen, p. 34
  50. ^ Joslen, p. 35
  51. ^ Joslen, p. 37
  52. ^ Joslen, p. 39
  53. ^ Joslen, p. 41
  54. ^ Joslen, p. 43
  55. ^ Joslen, p. 45
  56. ^ Joslen, p. 47
  57. ^ Joslen, p. 49
  58. ^ Joslen, p. 51
  59. ^ Joslen, p. 53
  60. ^ Joslen, p. 54
  61. ^ Joslen, p. 55
  62. ^ Joslen, p. 56
  63. ^ Joslen, p. 57
  64. ^ Joslen, p. 58
  65. ^ Joslen, p. 60
  66. ^ Joslen, p. 62
  67. ^ Joslen, p. 63
  68. ^ Joslen, p. 65
  69. ^ Joslen, p. 68
  70. ^ Joslen, p. 69
  71. ^ Joslen, p. 71
  72. ^ Joslen, p. 73
  73. ^ Joslen, p. 75
  74. ^ a b Joslen, p. 77
  75. ^ Joslen, p. 79
  76. ^ Joslen, p. 81
  77. ^ Joslen, p. 83
  78. ^ Joslen, p. 85
  79. ^ Joslen, p. 87
  80. ^ Joslen, p. 89
  81. ^ Joslen, p. 90
  82. ^ Joslen, p. 92
  83. ^ Joslen, p. 93
  84. ^ Joslen, p. 95
  85. ^ Joslen, p. 97
  86. ^ Joslen, p. 98
  87. ^ Joslen, p. 99
  88. ^ Joslen, p. 100
  89. ^ Joslen, p. 101
  90. ^ Joslen, p. 103

References[edit]

  • Bellis, Malcom (1995). Regiments of the British Army 1939 - 1945 (Artillery). Military Press International. ISBN 0-85420-1106. 
  • Buckley, John (2006) [2004]. British Armour in the Normandy Campaign 1944. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0-415-40773-7. OCLC 154699922. 
  • Buckingham, William (2002). Arnhem 1944. Temps Publishing Ltd. ISBN 0-7524-1999-4. 
  • Carter, Brigadier R.M.P. (2005) [1988]. The History of the 4th Armoured Brigade. Merriam Press. ISBN 1-57638-018-1. 
  • Chappell, Mike (1987). British Battle Insignia (2): 1939–1940. Men-At-Arms. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 0-85045-739-4. 
  • Fraser, David (1999) [1983]. And We Shall Shock Them: The British Army in the Second World War. London: Cassell Military Paperbacks. ISBN 0-304-35233-0. 
  • Jackson, G.S.; Staff, 8 Corps (2006) [1945]. 8 Corps: Normandy to the Baltic. Smalldale: MLRS Books. ISBN 978-1-905696-25-3. 
  • Joslen, Lt-Col H.F. (2003) [1st. pub. HMSO:1960]. Orders of Battle: Second World War, 1939–1945. Uckfield: Naval and Military Press. ISBN 9781843424741. OCLC 65152579. 
  • Perry, Frederick William (1988). The Commonwealth Armies: Manpower and Organisation in Two World Wars. Manchester University Press ND. ISBN 0-7190-2595-8. 
  • Playfair, Major-General I.S.O.; with Flynn R.N., Captain F.C.; Molony, Brigadier C.J.C. & Toomer, Air Vice-Marshal S.E. (2004) [1st. pub. HMSO 1956]. Butler, J.R.M, ed. The Mediterranean and Middle East, Volume II The Germans Come to the Help of Their Ally (1941). History of the Second World War, United Kingdom Military Series. Naval & Military Press. ISBN 1-84574-066-1. 
  • Holt, Thaddeus (2004). The Deceivers: Allied Military Deception in the Second World War. New York: Scribner. ISBN 9780743250429. 
  • Trew, Simon; Badsey, Stephen (2004). Battle for Caen. Battle Zone Normandy. Faber and Faber. ISBN 0-7509-3010-1. 
  • Axis History Forum discussion on British deception divisions in World War II at http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=67514

External links[edit]