List of Brown University buildings

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Brown University Coat of Arms

The following is a list of buildings at Brown University. Six buildings are listed with the United States Department of the Interior's National Register of Historic Places: University Hall (1770), Nightingale-Brown House (1792), Gardner House (1806), Hoppin House (1855), Corliss-Brackett House (1887), and the Ladd Observatory (1891).[1]

Academic Facilities[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
Alumnae Hall Andrews, Jones, Biscoe and Whitmore 1927 Built of brick with limestone trim, was designed to accommodate the social and religious activities of the Women’s College. Its main entrance is a balustraded stone terrace on the campus leading to an auditorium on the main floor. When the building was opened a large organ was installed, the gift of Mrs. C. Prescott Knight and Mrs. Webster Knight in memory of their sister-in-law, Edith Knight.
Arnold Laboratory BrownUniversity-ArnoldLaboratory.jpg Clarke and Howe 1915 Built with a donation from Dr. Oliver H. Arnold (class of 1865), Arnold Laboratory was designed as lab space for the biological sciences. Currently, the building houses many of the administrative offices of the Division of Biology and Medicine. [2]
Barus and Holley Building BrownUniversity-BarusHolleyBuilding.jpg Sherwood, Mills and Smith 1963–1965 Named for faculty member and physicist Carl Barus and engineer Alexander Lyman Holley (class of 1853), Barus and Holley is home to the University's Physics Department and School of Engineering. At opening, the seven story building contained approximately 130 offices and over 80 labs. The later addition of Giancarlo Labs to the engineering complex added more laboratory and research space. [3]
Barus Hall BrownUniversity-BarusHall.jpg 1900
88 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-88BenevolentSt.jpg 1867 Location of the studios and offices for WBRU
Blistein House BrownUniversity-BlisteinHouse.jpg 1867 Named for Elmer Blistein, Professor of Shakespeare; first Jew to graduate from Brown and first to teach there.
333 Brook Street BrownUniversity-333BrookSt.jpg 1900
341 Brook Street BrownUniversity-341BrookSt.jpg 1895
68½ Brown Street BrownUniversity-68HalfBrownSt.jpg 2001
70 Brown Street BrownUniversity-70BrownSt.jpg 2001
Dyer House BrownUniversity-DyerHouse.jpg John Holden Greene 1822
Edward W. Kassar House BrownUniversity-EdwardWKassarHouse.jpg 1884 Originally built for Nancy Bishop, the University acquired the house in 1977 and named the building in honor of Edward W. Kassar. Gould Laboratory, a brick addition to the house, was built in 1982, providing additional laboratory and classroom space for the Computer Sciences Department. In 1990, Kassar House was integrated into a new building for the Mathematics Department designed by William Kite Architects. [4]
Feinstein House BrownUniversity-FeinsteinHouse.jpg 1917
Frederick Lippitt and Mary Ann Lippitt House BrownUniversity-LippittHouse.jpg 1865
Thomas Whitaker house BrownUniversity-67GeorgeSt.jpg John Holden Greene 1821
155 George Street BrownUniversity-155GeorgeSt.jpg 1930
180 George Street BrownUniversity-180GeorgeSt.jpg Philip Johnson 1961 The Computing Laboratory was built to house an IBM7070 computer. The building was reassigned for the use of the Applied Mathematics Division with the opening of the Center for Information Technology in 1988. [5]
182 George Street BrownUniversity-182GeorgeSt.jpg Angell and Swift 1885 The Henry and Elizabeth Pearce Estate. Designed by Providence architects Angell and Swift in the Romanesque Revival style, after Henry Hobson Richardson. Brown purchased the main house in 1952. [6]
Giancarlo Laboratories Giancarlo Laboratories (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Payette Associates 2001 The newest building in the engineering complex, the Giancarlo Laboratories bears the name Charles H. Giancarlo (class of 1979) of Cisco Systems, Inc.. The laboratory provides the main entrance into the engineering buildings and adjoins the Barus and Holley Building and Prince Engineering Laboratory. Contained inside are state of the art labs, including the main engineering student computing facility. [7][8]
Giddings House BrownUniversity-GiddingsHouse.jpg 1908
Grant Recital Hall BrownUniversity-GrantRecitalHall.jpg 1845
190 Hope Street BrownUniversity-190HopeSt.jpg 1865
Horace Mann House BrownUniversity-HoraceMannHouse.jpg 1854
Hunter Laboratory BrownUniversity-HunterLaboratory.jpg 1958
Jerimoth Hill property JerimothHill2.JPG N/A N/A In 1953, Walter Raymond Turner (class of 1911) donated a 5-acre (20,000 m2) plot of land (as well as an easement to access the land from Route 101) atop Jerimoth Hill to the University. At 812 feet (247 m) above sea level, a rock outcropping on the Jerimoth Hill property is the highest natural point in the state of Rhode Island. The property is used by the Physics Department for astronomy courses and is largely undeveloped, containing only small sheds that house astronomy equipment. [9][10]
Lincoln Field Building BrownUniversity-LincolnFieldBuilding.jpg 1903
List Art Building BrownUniversity-ListArtBuilding.jpg Philip Johnson 1971 [11]
Lyman Hall BrownUniversity-LymanHall.jpg 1891
MacMillan Hall BrownUniversity-MacMillanHall.jpg 1998
Manning Hall BrownUniversity-ManningHall.jpg 1834
29 Manning Street BrownUniversity-29ManningSt.jpg 1938
37 Manning Street BrownUniversity-37ManningSt.jpg 1897
Marston Hall BrownUniversity-MarstonHall.jpg 1926
Maxcy Hall BrownUniversity-MaxcyHall.jpg 1895
Mencoff Hall BrownUniversity-MencoffHall.jpg 1844
Metcalf Research Laboratory BrownUniversity-MetcalfResearchLaboratory.jpg 1930
Morrison-Gerard Studio BrownUniversity-MorrisonGerardStudio.jpg 1845
Paolino Building BrownUniversity-PaolinoBuilding.jpg 1850
Partridge Hall BrownUniversity-PartridgeHall.jpg 1894
Prospect House BrownUniversity-ProspectHouse.jpg 1875
Prince Engineering Laboratory BrownUniversity-PrinceEngineeringLaboratory.jpg Sherwood, Mills and Smith 1962 Part of the engineering complex, Prince Engineering Laboratory is named for Frank John Prince (director of the Universal Match Corporation of St. Louis) and is home to research in structure and materials, thermodynamics, and fluid mechanics. [12]
Plant Environmental Center BrownUniversity-PlantEnvironmentalCenter.jpg 1900
Rhode Island Hall BrownUniversity-RhodeIslandHall.jpg 1840
222 Richmond Street Brown Alpert Medical School Med-Ed Building.JPG 1928 Converted to Medical Education building for Alpert Medical School, opened in 2011. [13]
Robinson Hall BrownUniversity-RobinsonHall.jpg 1878 Originally built as a library. That use ended when the John Hay Library was built. Currently houses the Economics Department.
Rochambeau House BrownUniversity-RochambeauHouse.jpg 1929
Salomon Center BrownUniversity-SalomonCenter.jpg 1862
Sayles Hall Brown University Sayles Hall.JPG Alpheus C. Morse 1881 Romanesque; memorial to William Clark Sayles
70 Ship Street Brown University Laboratories for Molecular Medicine.jpg 1912 Home to the Laboratories for Molecular Medicine.
Shirley Miller House BrownUniversity-ShirleyMillerHouse.jpg 1915
Smith-Buonanno Hall BrownUniversity-SmithBuonannoHall.jpg 1907
121 South Main Street BrownUniversity-121SouthMainStreet.jpg Edward Larrabee Barnes 1984 Purchased in 2005, 121 South Main Street is an 11 story building located along the Providence River in Providence's central business district. Originally constructed for the Old Stone Corporation, the building currently serves largely as a commercial property. As leases expire, the University has been expanding academic departments into the free space, including the Program in Public Health, the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, the Department of Community Health, the Center for Population Health and Clinical Epidemiology, and the Center for Statistical Sciences. [14]
Steinert Hall BrownUniversity-SteinertHall.jpg 1966
T.F. Green Hall BrownUniversity-TFGreenHall.jpg 1959
135 Thayer Street BrownUniversity-135ThayerSt.jpg 1928
151 Thayer Street BrownUniversity-151ThayerSt.jpg 19??
Walter Hall BrownUniversity-WalterHall.jpg 1857
70 Waterman Street BrownUniversity-70WatermanSt.jpg 1859
131 Waterman Street BrownUniversity-131WatermanSt.jpg 1852
133 Waterman Street BrownUniversity-133WatermanSt.jpg 1885
137 Waterman Street BrownUniversity-137WatermanSt.jpg 1910
Watson Center of Information Technology BrownUniversity-WatsonCIT.jpg 1988
Watson Institute for International Studies BrownUniversity-WatsonInstitute.jpg 2001
Wilbour Hall BrownUniversity-WilbourHall.jpg 1888 Named for Charles Edwin Wilbour

Administrative Buildings[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
5 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-5BenevolentSt.jpg 1844 5 Benevolent Street is home to the Office of the Chancellor, the highest ranking position in the Corporation of Brown University, which is currently held by Thomas J. Tisch (class of 1976). [15]
20 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-20BenevolentSt.jpg 1820 20 Benevolent is home to the Office of Student Life. [16]
26 Benevolent Street 1823 26 Benevolent is home to the Sarah Doyle Women's Center, created in 1975 and named for nineteenth-century educator Sarah Doyle. The center offers many services, including lectures, discussions, films and forums relating to women's issues, as well as a gallery. [17][18]
Benoni Cooke House BrownUniversity-BenoniCookeHouse.jpg John Holden Greene 1828 Originally built for Benoni Cooke, Brown University acquired the house in 1995. It now houses the University's Office of Internal Audit and the Office of the Vice President & General Counsel. [19][20][21]
382 Brook Street 382 Brook Street is home to the administrative offices of the Center for Computation and Visualization (CCV). The CCV's facilities are located at 180 George Street. (leased space) [16]
Brown Office Building Kent, Cruise & Associates 1969 Home to the Brown University Bookstore, the Brown Office Building also contains the Office of Environmental Health and Safety, Financial Services, Human Resources, and Graphic Services. [22][23]
Corliss-Brackett House BrownUniversity-CorlissBrackettHouse.jpg 1875–1882 Corliss-Bracket House was built by George Henry Corliss, inventor of the Corliss Steam Engine and later acquired by Charles Brackett, a motion picture writer, who donated the house to the University. The house has been listed with the National Register of Historic Places since 1970. Since 1973, the house has served as the Admission Office for the University. [24][25]
3 Davol Square Located in the Jewelry District, 3 Davol Square is home to the administrative systems groups of Computing and Information Services. The Help Desk, Service & Repair and computer operations are located in the Watson Center of Information Technology. (leased space) [26]
110 Elm Street 1848 Originally built by the Phenix Iron Foundry and once on the Providence Preservation Society's "Most Endangered Properties List", Brown University has since restored 110 Elm Street, where the Development Office is now located. (leased space) [27][28]
8 Fones Alley 1900 8 Fones Alley is home to the Financial Aid Office. [29]
25 George Street 1913 25 George Street is home to the Swearer Center for Public Service, named in honor of Howard Robert Swearer, which opened in 1986 to provide support programs and resources to allow students to integrate public service into their education. [16][30]
Grad Center E BrownUniversity-GraduateCenter.jpg Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 1968 A four story building surrounded by the four Grad Center residence halls, Grad Center E is home to the Office of Summer & Continuing Studies, contains an athletic and recreational center named the Bear's Lair, and also is home to the Brown University Faculty and Graduate School Club (better known as the Graduate Center Bar). [31]
Hoppin House Alpheus C. Morse ~1855
(variously dated)
Hoppin House, named for Thomas P. Hoppin, is home to the Annenberg Institute for School Reform. Founded by the Annenberg Foundation, the Annenberg Institute aims to help urban communities, schools and districts build smart school systems that provide both excellent education and equitable opportunities for every student. The house has been listed with the National Register of Historic Places since 1973. [25][32][33]
Maddock Alumni Center BrownUniversity-MaddockAlumniCenter.jpg Stone and Carpenter (~1882 addition) ~1830 Maddock Alumni Center is located in the former home of Chancellor William Goddard (class of 1846). Goddard's daughter deeded the house to the University in 1940, and in 1974, the center was named in honor of Paul L. Maddock (class of 1933), the principal donor in its restoration. The building is currently occupied by the Alumni Relations. [34][35]
Nicholson House BrownUniversity-NicholsonHouse.jpg Stone and Carpenter 1878–1879 Originally built for Francis W. Goddard, Nicholson House is named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Nicholson, president of the Nicholson File Company and former owner of the house. Currently, Nicholson house is home to Public Affairs and University Relations. 71 George Street. [36]
Rhode Island Hall Tallman and Bucklin 1840 Rhode Island Hall, so named because the majority of the funds for erecting the building came from Rhode Island residents, was originally built to house classrooms and laboratory space for the Departments of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Mineralogy, Geology, and Natural History. The building currently houses the Office of International Programs and Psychological Services. [37]
University Hall BrownUniversity-UniversityHall.jpg Unknown;
Perry, Shaw and Hepburn (1939 renovation)
1770 The first building of Brown University, University Hall was originally called the "College Edifice." Until 1832, the building housed the entire institution, containing residential rooms, lecture and recitation rooms, a chapel, a library, and a dining hall. Currently, University Hall is home to several administrative offices, including the President's office, the Office of the Provost, Office of the Registrar, and the Dean of the College. The building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962. [38][39]
131 Waterman Street 1852 131 Waterman Street is home to the ArtsLiteracy Project. Part of the Education Department, the project aims to develop the literacy of youth through the performing and visual arts. [16][40]
133 Waterman Street 1885 133 Waterman Street is home to the Center for the Study of Human Development. Founded in 1967, the center focuses on research and teaching in the fields of child and adolescent development. [16][41]

Libraries[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
Annmary Brown Memorial BrownUniversity-AnnmaryBrownMemorial.jpg Norman Isham 1903–1907 The Annmary Brown Memorial is home to exhibits of European and American paintings from the 17th through the 20th centuries as well as the a Mazansky British Sword Collection. Rush Hawkins built the memorial in memory of his wife, Annmary Brown Hawkins (granddaughter of Nicholas Brown), both of whom are entombed in a crypt at the rear of the memorial. [42][43]
John Carter Brown Library BrownUniversity-JohnCarterBrownLibrary.jpg Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge 1904 The John Carter Brown Library, named for John Carter Brown (the son of Nicholas Brown), is an independently funded research library of the humanities housing one of the world's finest collections of rare books and maps relating to the European discovery, exploration, settlement, and development of the New World until circa 1820. [16][44]
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library BrownUniversity-JohnDRockefellerJrLibrary.jpg Warner, Burns, Toan, Lunde 1962–1964 John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, named for John D. Rockefeller, Jr. (class of 1897), is the primary teaching and research library for the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. [16][45]
John Hay Library BrownUniversity-JohnHayLibrary.jpg Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge 1910 The second library built by Brown University (the first being Robinson Hall, now home to the Economics Department), the John Hay Library served as the main library of the University until the completion of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library. The library, named for John Hay (class of 1858), now houses the University's special collections and the University Archives. [46][47]
Library Collections Annex 1969 Opened in 2006, the Library Collections Annex is located 4 miles (6.4 km) from Brown University's main campus. The Annex is a storage facility with a capacity of approximately 1.7 million volumes. [16][48]
Orwig Music Center BrownUniversity-OrwigMusicBuilding.jpg Carrère and Hastings (remodel) 1850 (1988 addition) Named for Benton B. Orwig (class of 1920), the Orwig Music Center is home to the Virginia Baldwin Orwig Music Library, which houses the general music collection, including music books, scores, periodicals, sound recordings, videotapes and microforms. [49]
Sciences Library BrownUniversity-SciencesLibrary.jpg Warner, Burns, Toan and Lunde 1969–1971 A 14 story building completed in the Brutalist architectural style, the Sciences Library houses the University's collection of science volumes as the Friedman Study Center. [16][50]

Residential Buildings[edit]

Residence Halls[edit]

East Campus[edit]

The East Campus was originally the main campus location of Brown's former neighbor Bryant College. Brown purchased Bryant's campus in 1969 for $5.0 million when the latter school moved to a new campus in Smithfield, Rhode Island. This added 10 acres (40,000 m2) of land adjacent to Brown's existing campus. In 1971, the area formerly occupied by Bryant was officially designated as East Campus.[51]

Building Image Architect Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Barbour Hall BrownUniversity-BarbourHall.jpg 1904 [16]
Barbour Hall Apartments BrownUniversity-BarbourHallApartments.jpg
Grad Center A BrownUniversity-GradCenterA.jpg Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 1968 [31]
Grad Center B BrownUniversity-GradCenterB.jpg Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 1968 [31]
Grad Center C BrownUniversity-GradCenterC.jpg Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 1968 [31]
Grad Center D BrownUniversity-GradCenterD.jpg Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 1968 [31]
King House BrownUniversity-KingHouse.jpg 1895 Originally the administration building for Bryant College and named Taft House for its first owner Robert W. Taft, King House was renamed in 1974 in honor of Lida Shaw King, former dean of Pembroke College. Currently, the building serves as a residence hall and home to one of the University's program houses, St. Anthony's Hall. [16][51]
Perkins Hall BrownUniversity-PerkinsHall.jpg 1960 Opened as Gardner Hall for Bryant College, the residence hall was later renamed Perkins Hall in 1974 in honor of Judge Fred B. Perkins (class of 1919). Today the building is occupied nearly entirely by freshman. [51]
Young Orchard 2 BrownUniversity-YoungOrchard2.jpg 1973 [51]
Young Orchard 4 BrownUniversity-YoungOrchard4.jpg 1973 [51]
Young Orchard 10 BrownUniversity-YoungOrchard10.jpg 1973 [51]
Vartan Gregorian Quad A BrownUniversity-VartanGregorianQuad.jpg 1990–1991 [52]
Vartan Gregorian Quad B BrownUniversity-VartanGregorianQuad.jpg 1990–1991 [52]

Keeney Quadrangle[edit]

Keeney Quadrangle (originally named West Quadrangle) opened in 1957 as, in the words of President Barnaby Keeney, a place "to provide a dignified and happy home for the independents." The quadrangle was dedicated to Keeney in 1982.[53]

Containing 6 houses, the quadrangle houses approximately 585 students.[53]

Building Image Architect Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Archibald House Archibald House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Thomas Mott Shaw 1955–1957 Named for Raymond Clare Archibald, professor of mathematics from 1909 to 1943, Archibald House is primarily a freshman hall, containing mostly double occupancy rooms. Single occupancy rooms are assigned to upperclassmen. [53][54]
Bronson House Bronson House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Thomas Mott Shaw 1955–1957 Named for Walter Cochrane Bronson (class of 1887), professor of English from 1892 to 1927, Bronson House is primarily a freshman hall, containing mostly double occupancy rooms. Single occupancy rooms are assigned to upperclassmen. [53][55]
Everett House Everett House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Thomas Mott Shaw 1955–1957 Named for Walter Goodnow Everett (class of 1885), professor of Latin, philosophy, and natural theology from 1890 to 1930, Everett House is primarily a freshman hall, containing mostly double occupancy rooms. Single occupancy rooms are assigned to upperclassmen. [53][56]
Jameson House Jameson House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Thomas Mott Shaw 1955–1957 Named for John Franklin Jameson, professor of history from 1888 to 1901, Jameson House is primarily a freshman hall, containing mostly double occupancy rooms. Single occupancy rooms are assigned to upperclassmen. [53][57]
Mead House Mead House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Thomas Mott Shaw 1955–1957 Named for Albert Davis Mead, professor biology from 1895 to 1930 and vice-president of the University from 1925 to 1936, Mead House is primarily a freshman hall, containing mostly double occupancy rooms. Single occupancy rooms are assigned to upperclassmen. [53][58]
Poland House Poland House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Thomas Mott Shaw 1955–1957 Named for William Carey Poland (class of 1868), professor of classics from 1870 to 1892 and professor of art history from 1892 to 1950, Poland House is primarily a freshman hall, containing mostly double occupancy rooms. Single occupancy rooms are assigned to upperclassmen. [53][59]

Main Campus[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Caswell Hall BrownUniversity-CaswellHall.jpg Hoppin and Ely 1903 90 [60]
Hegeman Hall BrownUniversity-HegemanHall.jpg Day & Klauder 1926 [61][62]
Hope College BrownUniversity-HopeCollege.jpg 1822 78 [63]
Littlefield Hall BrownUniversity-LittlefieldHall.jpg Day & Klauder 1925 78 [61][64]
Minden Hall BrownUniversity-MindenHall.jpg 1912 [16]
Slater Hall BrownUniversity-SlaterHall.jpg Stone, Carpenter & Willson 1879 [61][65]

Pembroke Campus[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
111 Brown Street 1900 [16]
Andrews Hall BrownUniversity-AndrewsHall.jpg 1947 [16]
Champlin Hall Champlin Hall (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Robert C. Dean of Perry, Shaw, Hepburn and Dean 1960 [66]
Emery Hall BrownUniversity-EmeryWoolleyHalls.jpg Robert C. Dean of Perry, Shaw, Hepburn and Dean 1963 [67]
Machado House BrownUniversity-MachadoHouse.jpg Parker, Thomas and Rice 1912 [68]
Metcalf Hall Metcalf Hall (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Andrews, Jacques and Rantoul 1919 The second residence hall to be built for the Women's College, Metcalf Hall was built with a donation from Stephen O. Metcalf. The hall is built directly opposite of Miller Hall, the first residence hall for the Women's College. [61][69]
Miller Hall Miller Hall (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Andrews, Jacques and Rantoul 1910 50 Miller Hall, named for Mr. and Mrs. Horace G. Miller who provided funds to build the hall, is a colonial style building of brick with white limestone trim and was the first residence hall built for the Women's College. [70]
Morriss Hall Morriss Hall (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Robert C. Dean of Perry, Shaw, Hepburn and Dean 1960 [66]
New Pembroke #1 New Pembroke 1 (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Donlyn Lyndon 1974 [71]
New Pembroke #2 New Pembroke 2 (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Donlyn Lyndon 1974 [71]
New Pembroke #3 New Pembroke 3 (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Donlyn Lyndon 1974 [71]
New Pembroke #4 New Pembroke 4 (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Donlyn Lyndon 1974 [71]
Plantations House 1896 [16]
West House West House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg 1885 [16]
Woolley Hall BrownUniversity-EmeryWoolleyHalls.jpg Robert C. Dean of Perry, Shaw, Hepburn and Dean 1963 [67]

Wriston Quadrangle[edit]

Wriston Quadrangle, built from 1950 to 1952, consists of 9 residential buildings bordered by George Street, Thayer Street, Charlesfield Street, and Brown Street. Fifty-one buildings in total were razed to make space for the development. The buildings were designed to house a fraternity on each end of the building, with independents living in the rooms in between.[72]

At the time the quad was built, many (though not all) of the University's fraternities were in financial trouble and membership numbers struggled due to the limited number of civilian students on campus (much of the University's housing at the time was used for students in the Armed Forces training program). In return for University housing in Wriston Quadrangle, the fraternities were compelled to deed their privately owned houses (many in disrepair) to the University.[73]

The quad still houses the majority of the University's fraternities, sororities, and program houses.

Building Image Architect Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Buxton House BrownUniversity-BuxtonHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Buxton House is named for Colonel G. Edward Buxton, Jr. (class of 1902), who was Chairman of the Housing and Development Campaign for Wriston Quadrangle. The house is currently home to Buxton International House, one of Brown's program houses. [72]
Chapin House BrownUniversity-ChapinHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Chapin House is named for Dr. Charles V. Chapin (class of 1876), professor of Physiology. Chapin was Superintendent of Health in Providence for 48 years and pioneered modern methods of treating infectious diseases in the Providence City Hospital. Chapin House is home to both the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity and Harambee House, one of Brown's program houses. [72][74]
Diman House BrownUniversity-DimanHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Diman House is named for Jeremiah Lewis Diman (class of 1851), professor of History at the University. The building is home to both the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority and Interfaith House, one of Brown's program houses. [72][75]
Goddard House BrownUniversity-GoddardHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Goddard House is named for William Giles Goddard (class of 1812), professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics and of "Belles-Lettres" and Trustee and Fellow of the University. Goddard House is home to the Alpha Delta Phi Society and Delta Phi Fraternity. [72][76]
Harkness House BrownUniversity-HarknessHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Harkness House is named for Professor Albert Harkness (class of 1842), professor of Classics and a Fellow of the University from 1904 to 1907. Harkness House is home to both Technology House and Art House, two of Brown's program houses. [72][77]
Marcy House BrownUniversity-MarcyHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Marcy House is named for William L. Marcy (class of 1808), Comptroller of the State of New York, U.S. Senator, Governor of New York for three terms, Secretary of War, and U.S. Secretary of State. Marcy House is houses both the Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity and the Zeta Delta Xi Fraternity. [72][78]
Olney House BrownUniversity-OlneyHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Olney is named for Richard Olney (class of 1856), Attorney General to President Cleveland and U.S. Secretary of State. Olney House is home to the Sigma Chi Fraternity, the Delta Tau Fraternity, and Cooking House, one of Brown's program houses. [72][79]
Sears House BrownUniversity-SearsHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Sears House, named for Barnas Sears (class of 1825), president of the University from 1855 to 1867. The building is home to both the Alpha Chi Omega Sorority and Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity [72][80]
Wayland House BrownUniversity-WaylandHouse.jpg Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Wayland House is named for Francis Wayland, president from 1827 to 1855. The first floor of Wayland House is occupied by the Office of Residential Life and the Office of Auxiliary Housing. The doubles on the upper floors are used to house freshman; the singles and fourth floor suites are occupied by upperclassmen. The building is also the home of the Jabberwocks of Brown University, the school's oldest male a cappella group, who maintain their practice room and headquarters in the basement of North Wayland. [72][81]

Rental Properties[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
127 Angell Street 1853 [16]
129 Angell Street 1849 [16]
22 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-22BenevolentSt.jpg 1816 [16]
70-72 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-7072BenevolentSt.jpg 1880 [16]
74-80 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-7476BenevolentSt.jpg 1883 The home features locking mechanisms and security measures developed by the U.S. Secret Service from when Prince Faisal bin Al Hussein of Jordan (Brown class of 1985) lived here. [16]
84 Benevolent Street 1865 [16]
86 Benevolent Street 1865 [16]
95 Benevolent Street 1885 [16]
97 Benevolent Street 1860 [16]
99 Benevolent Street 1860 [16]
247 Bowen Street 1895 [16]
251 Bowen Street 1900 [16]
245-247 Brook Street 1900 [16]
277 Brook Street 1866 [16]
281-283 Brook Street 1880 [16]
93 Brown Street 1885 [16]
95 Brown Street BrownUniversity-95BrownSt.jpg 1885 [16]
131-133 Brown Street 1850 [16]
38 Charlesfield Street 38 Charlesfield Street (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg 1845 Originally built by Robert Purkis and deeded to Brown University in 1946, the home was originally located across the street and moved to its current location in 1950, coinciding with the construction of Wriston Quadrangle. Currently, the house is occupied by a member of the University's Faculty Fellow program. [82]
59 Charlesfield Street 1877 [16]
70-72 Charlesfield Street 70-72 Charlesfield Street (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg 1915 [16]
71-73 Charlesfield Street 71-73 Charlesfield Street (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg 1872 Acquired by Brown in 1969 as part of the purchase of the former site of Bryant College, 71-73 Charlesfield Street was renovated in 2006-2007 to contain 18 studio apartments and two one-bedroom apartments for use by first year graduate students. Until 1997, the house had been known as Milhous and used by the Brown Association for Cooperative Housing. [83][84][85]
108-110 Charlesfield Street 1910 [16]
84-86 Cushing Street 1895 [16]
154 Cushing Street 1895 [16]
134 Hope Street BrownUniversity-134HopeSt.jpg 1910 [16]
20 Olive Street 1885 [16]
307 Thayer Street 1865 [16]
86 Waterman Street 1880 [16]

Additional Facilities[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
Andrews House Andrews House (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg Ogden Codman 1901 Originally built for James Coats and later serving as the Governor's Mansion, the University purchased the building in 1922 and named it in honor of President E. Benjamin Andrews. Andrews House is now home to Brown's infirmary and Health Services. [86]
Carrie Tower BrownUniversity-CarrieTower.jpg Guy Lowell 1904 Located on the corner of Prospect and Waterman Streets, Carrie Tower is a 95-foot (29 m) tall monument named in honor of Caroline Mathilde Brown, granddaughter of Nicholas Brown. Carved into the granite foundation is the inscription "Love is Strong as Death." [87]
Cabinet Building Mencoff Hall (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg James C. Bucklin; Stone and Carpenter (1891 addition) 1844 The Cabinet Building, so named as it was built as the "Cabinet" of the Rhode Island Historical Society, was acquiered by the University in 1942 and currently houses the Population Studies and Training Center. [88]
Central Heat Plant 1969 The Central Heat Plant provides heat for over 90 buildings on the University's campus. Undergoing renovations from 2005–2008, President Ruth Simmons announced that the plant would reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels by 30% by fiscal year 2008. [16][89][90]
75-77 Charlesfield Street 75-77 Charlesfield Street (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg 1967 75-77 Charlesfield Street is the headquarters for the Department of Public Safety. [91]
37 Cooke Street 1909 37 Cooke Street is the home of the University's Provost. [92]
Faculty Club BrownUniversity-FacultyClub.jpg 1865 Originally the home of Zachariah Allen a prominent citizen of Providence and 1813 Brown graduate.
Faunce House BrownUniversity-FaunceHouse.jpg 1903
Fox Point Daycare Center 1961 Originally built as Kilcup Hall, Brown purchased the building in 1969 when Bryant College moved from Providence, Rhode Island to Smithfield, Rhode Island. In 1979 the center incorporated as a private nonprofit organization. The University allows the center to use the building rent-free. [51][93]
50 John Street 1910 50 John Street is used as a storage facility for the Department of Environmental Health and Safety. In 2003, the space was renovated to accommodate the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance and the Theatre Consortium. The facility is equipped as a professional shop and supports set design and construction for the Department's mainstage productions. [94][95]
Gardner House BrownUniversity-GardnerHouse.jpg 1806 Originally built for Joseph Haile, Gardner house bears the name of George Warren Gardner, M.D. (class of 1894) and his wife, Jessie Barker Gardner (class of 1896), the couple who restored the house back to its original condition. Gardner House serves as the guest house for the President of Brown University, lodging distinguished guests and visiting dignitaries. [96][97]
Ladd Observatory BrownUniversity-LaddObservatory.jpg Stone, Carpenter, and Willson 1891 Built on "Tin-top Hill," about a mile from the University's main campus, Ladd Observatory was built through the munificence of Governor Herbert W. Ladd on land donated by Frank W. and Knight D. Cheney. The observatory contains a refractor telescope with lens designed by Professor C. S. Hastings of Yale University. The observatory has been listed with the National Register of Historic Places since 2000. [25][98][99]
295 Lloyd Avenue 2003 The 50,000-square-foot (4,600 m2) building at 295 Lloyd Avenue houses the staff of the Department of Facilities Management. [100]
Nightingale-Brown House Nightingale-Brown House.jpg Caleb Ormsbee 1791 (1862 Library wing addition; 1880 addition) Built for Colonel Joseph Nightingale, the Nightingale-Brown House was purchased by Nicholas Brown in 1814 and housed members of the Brown family until 1985. The house is now preserved as the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage. The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989. [101][102]
Pembroke Field House 1938 Originally the barn on the estate of Charles T. Aldrich (class of 1877) and Henry L. Aldrich (class of 1876), Pembroke Field House opened in 1938 after renovation financed by various University classes. Currently, the field house is used as a function hall. [103]
Power Street Garage 1988 The Power Street Garage is a two story parking facility with approximately 400 total parking spaces. [16][104]
89 Power Street 1842 [16]
President's House BrownUniversity-PresidentsHouse.jpg William T. Aldrich 1922 The current President's House, originally built for Rush Sturges and acquired by the University in 1947, is the fourth such home for the University president (the first three have been demolished). [105]
Sharpe Refectory BrownUniversity-SharpeRefectory.jpg 1951 Nicknamed "the Ratty" by students, Sharpe Refectory is Brown's largest dining hall. It is located on Wriston Quad near the center of campus. Food service is all-you-care-to-eat with several hot and cold food stations available at each meal. Several times each semester, the Ratty features theme meals complete with decoration. Payment can be made via meal plan credits or Flex points, cash, or Brown card cash equivalents (declining balance). [16][106]
Taft Avenue Daycare Center 1982 [16]
285 Tockwotten Street 1895 [16]

Commercial Properties[edit]

Brown University owns several properties that are not yet used to support the institution's mission. These properties are leased to businesses until such time that the University expands into the buildings.

Building Image Location Constructed Notes Reference
83-85 Benevolent Street College Hill 1857 83-85 Benevolent Street is currently occupied by Oliver's Grille & Bar. [16][107]
248-254 Brook Street College Hill 1900 248-254 Brook Street is currently occupied by East Side Mini Mart, Bagel Gourmet, and Squire Cleaners & Tailors. In October 2003, the University announced that the Providence Police District 9 Substation would be located, rent free, in the mall. [16][108]
1 Davol Square Jewelry District [109]
10 Davol Square Jewelry District [109]
339 Eddy Street Jewelry District [109]
349 Eddy Street Jewelry District [109]
196 Richmond Street Jewelry District [109]
233 Richmond Street Jewelry District [109]

Athletic Facilities[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
Brown Stadium BrownStad-MainStands1.JPG Gavin Hadden, Paul Cret 1925 Opened as Brown University Field, Brown Stadium is home to the University's football and outdoor track teams. The stadium is located approximately 1-mile (1.6 km) from main campus and has a capacity of approximately 20,000. [110]
Marston Boat House 1966 (acquired) The Marston Boat House is located close to India Point Park in Providence along the Seekonk River and is home to Brown's crew team. [111]
Meehan Auditorium BrownUniversity-MeehanAuditorium.jpg Perry, Shaw, Hepburn & Dean 1961 Named in honor of George V. Meehan, Meehan Auditorium holds an ice rink for intercollegiate hockey games and also serves as a venue for large indoor events. The auditorium holds 2100, increasing to 5000 when temporary seating covers the ice surface. [16][112]
Olney-Margolies Athletic Center BrownUniversity-OlneyMargoliesAthleticCenter.jpg Daniel F. Tully 1981 Named for Joseph Olney and Moe Price Margolies (both class of 1936), the Olney-Margolies Athletic Center contains space for basketball, tennis, and volleyball courts, a six-lane 200-meter track, batting and golf cages, and long jump, high jump, and pole vault pits. There is also a 1.8-acre (7,300 m2) playing field located on the roof. [113]
Pizzitola Sports Center BrownUniversity-PizzitolaSportsCenter.jpg Eggers Group 1987–1988 The Pizzitola Sports Center, named for Paul Bailey Pizzitola (class of 1981), holds the University's courts for basketball, volleyball, and squash as well as facilities for wrestling and gymnastics and four tennis courts. The main competition court seats approximately 2,800. [114]
Smith Swimming Center BrownUniversity-SmithSwimCenter.jpg Daniel F. Tully 1973 The Smith Swimming Center, named for H. Stanton Smith (class of 1921), was home to the University's swimming and diving programs. In 2007, the center was deemed unsafe due to "irreversible deterioration" in the strength of the support members of the roof structure. Plans are being drawn for a replacement facility. [115][116]

Vacant Properties[edit]

Building Image Architect Constructed Notes Reference
66-68 Benevolent Street BrownUniversity-6668BenevolentSt.jpg 1880 [16]
66-68 Charlesfield Street 66-68 Charlesfield Street (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA).jpg 1915 [16]
Old Stone Bank BrownUniversity-OldStoneBank.jpg 1854 [16]

References[edit]

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