List of Brown University people

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The following is a partial list of notable Brown University people, known as Brunonians. It includes alumni, professors, and others associated with Brown University and Pembroke College (Brown University), the former women's college of Brown.

Notable alumni and leaders of Brown[edit]

Note: "Class of" is used to denote the graduation class of individuals who attended Brown, but did not or have not graduated. When just the graduation year is noted, it is because it has not yet been determined which degree the individual earned.

Academia[edit]

Technology and innovation[edit]

Government, law and public policy[edit]

Governors[edit]

Stephen Hopkins with Brown University in the background

Legislators[edit]

Framer of the Founding Documents of the United States of America[edit]
United States Senators[edit]
Members of the United States House of Representatives[edit]
State Legislators[edit]

Mayors[edit]

Diplomats[edit]

Advisors[edit]

Activists[edit]

Jurists[edit]

Business[edit]

Journalism[edit]

Literature[edit]

Medicine[edit]

Varnum, painted posthumously in 1804 by Charles Willson Peale
  • David C. Lewis (A.B. 1957) – Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Community Health and first Donald G. Millar Distinguished Professor of Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown; a leading researcher and activist on drugs policy issues.
  • Alan H. Maurer - Professor of Radiology and Medicine and Director of Nuclear Medicine at Temple University Hospital
  • Neel Shah - Executive Director of Costs of Care, Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School

Military[edit]

  • James Mitchell Varnum (A.B. 1769) – General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and justice of the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territory.
  • Sidney Baumgarten (AB 1954) Brigadier General in the New York Guard (formerly U.S. Army Reserve), called to active duty for the last time on 9/11/01 in the wake of the attack on the World Trade Center. Awarded the NY State Conspicuous Service Medal by Governor Pataki for his role as Chief of Staff and for the mobilization and deployment of the troops on and after 9/11. Retired January 2005.

Performing arts[edit]

Music[edit]

Film[edit]

Television[edit]

Theater[edit]

Religion[edit]

The Rt. Reverend Bishop Griswold

Royalty[edit]

Visual arts[edit]

Athletics[edit]

Auto racing[edit]

Baseball[edit]

Basketball[edit]

Football[edit]

Olympics[edit]

Other sports[edit]

Colonial Era Brown Graduates (1769–1783)[edit]

1769[edit]

1770[edit]

1771[edit]

1772[edit]

1773[edit]

1774[edit]

1775[edit]

1782[edit]

Unclassified[edit]

Notable faculty (current and former)[edit]

Nigerian novelist, poet, professor and critic. Author of Things Fall Apart, the most widely read book in modern African literature.
David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies
Ghanaian novelist and playwright
Visiting Professor of Africana Studies and Literary Arts
Archaeologist, MacArthur Award recipient
Professor of Classics, Director of the Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
literary critic and author of Desire and Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel
Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Comparative Literature, English, Modern Culture & Media, and Gender Studies
Assistant Professor of Philosophy specializing in questions of moral agency.
American mathematician specializing in geometry. He is very well known for his research in differential geometry in three and four dimensions.
Professor of Mathematics
  • Mark F.Bear (Ph.D, Brown University)
neuroscientist. Author of one of the world's most widely used neuroscience introductory textbooks. Since 2003, the head of the MIT Brain Lab. Part of the 10-member jury, the Champalimaud Vision Award, bestowed by the Champalimaud Foundation.
discovered third photoreceptor in the eye (in addition to rods and cones)
Professor of Medical Science, Associate Professor of Neuroscience
  • Tracy Breton
winner of the Pulitzer Prize 1994 for investigative reporting
Visiting Professor of English
former president of Brazil
Professor-at-large of International Studies
former Republican member of the United States Senate
Distinguished Visiting Fellow in International Relations
famous philosopher known for his contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, free will, and the philosophy of perception; influenced a generation of Brown philosophers including Jaegwon Kim and Ernest Sosa, two of the world's most famous philosophers.
  • Jarat Chopra
international lawyer, father of peacekeeping doctrine since the Cold War
Thomas J. Watson Jr. Institute for International Studies faculty member
Nobel Prize in Physics 1972; father of superconductivity, and developer of the BCM theory of synaptic plasticity in neuroscience
Thomas J. Watson, Sr. Professor of Physics
post-modern writer, Spanking the Maid, The Origin of the Brunists; notable for his metafiction; electronic literature pioneer
T. B. Stowell University Professor, Adjunct Professor of English
celebrated poet, For Love
Professor of English
applied mathematician and philosopher of mathematics; co-author of The Mathematical Experience
Professor Emeritus of Applied Mathematics
  • Anne DeGroot
medical researcher developing vaccines for infectious diseases including HIV, TB, West Nile virus, smallpox, and tularemia
'Associate Professor of Community Health
founder of Cyberkinetics, a company that won FDA approval to test brain/robot interfaces (such as BrainGate) on humans
Professor and Chair of Neuroscience
  • David Dosa
geriatrician, author of "A Day in the Life of Oscar the Cat", the New England Journal of Medicine article which described the purported abilities of Oscar the cat to predict imminent death.
Assistant Professor of Medicine
an authority on the theory of plasticity in the field of applied mechanics; recipient of the National Medal of Science, the Timoshenko Medal, the ASME Medal, and the Drucker Medal, of which he is the namesake.
philosopher noted for philosophy of mind and aesthetics; influenced Roderick Chisholm; former president of the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division.
epidemiologist and addictionologist, author of "Drugs and the Whole Person"
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine
Professor of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences
a major contributor to the fields of sexology, biology of gender, sexual identity, gender identity, and gender roles.
writer; widely considered the most influential author of the Spanish speaking world since Jorge Luis Borges
economist studying economic growth; developer of the Unified growth theory.
Herbert H.Goldberger Professor of Economics
poet, author of Eye Against Eye, Torn Awake, Whiting Writers' Award and Howard Foundation Award winner
Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Philosopher and author of several books on Aristotle and Plato
  • David Benedict Professor of Classics and Philosophy
mathematician, originator of the Pattern Theory in mathematics, which also influenced David Mumford
L.Herbert Ballou University Professor
physicist; (co-)discoverer of the Higgs mechanism, Sakurai Prize winner
Chancellor's Professor of Physics
economist, co-originator of the Schumpeterian Paradigm with Philippe Aghion
poet; first Poet Laureate of the State of Rhode Island
Professor of English
planetary geologist who trained Apollo astronauts and led imaging teams for NASA's interplanetary unmanned probes, from the Viking program to Mars
Louis and Elizabeth Scherck Distinguished Professor of Geological Sciences
anthropologist, foremost anthropological researcher and scholar in field of alcohol studies.
Research Professor of Anthropology
broker of the Dayton Accords; former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.
Professor-at-Large of International Studies
archeologist, expert on Mayan hieroglyphics, recipient of the Macarthur fellowship
Professor of Anthropology
noted historian of Asian migration in Latin America and the Caribbean and theorist of diasporas and transnationalism
Professor of History and Professor of American Studies
historian, anthropologist, author of The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara and Prisoner of the Vatican
Provost, Paul Dupee, Jr. University Professor of Social Science, Professor of Anthropology, and Professor of Italian Studies
son of Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
Senior Fellow in International Studies
philosopher of mind, action theorist, author of Mind in a Physical World
William Herbert Perry Faunce Professor of Philosophy
of The Kosterlitz-Thouless transition (Condensed Matter Physics); winner of the 1981 Maxwell Medal and Prize, and the 2000 Onsager Prize (one of the APS main awards)
Professor of Physics
author, Listening to Prozac, Against Depression
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Achieved chemist who was consultant for the Manhattan Project and won the Priestley Medal and Franklin Medal.
linguist; known for publishing the first linguistic atlas of the US Linguistic Atlas of New England, winning the Loubat Prize, and for being the first main editor of the Middle English Dictionary
former president of Chile
Professor-at-large of International Studies
Barbadian author, "In the Castle of My Skin", "Natives of My Person"
Visiting Professor of Africana Studies and Literary Arts
Advisor to the United States Treasury, Federal Reserve System, and World Bank; highly cited economist, ranked 10th in the world, according to RePEc
James and Merryl Tisch Professor of Economics
addictions specialist and authority on drug policy
Donald G. Miller Distinguished Professor of Alcohol and Addiction
Once regarded as 'one of the most prominent black conservatives in the nation' now considered much more 'progressive.'
Professor of Economics
  • Peter MacAvoy
former member of the US Council of Economic Advisers
supporter of evolution involved in numerous public debates and trials about the teaching of intelligent design in schools
Professor of Biology
economist that researched into financial market fragility; his theories are considered the most accurate description of the financial crisis; namesake of the Minsky moment
noted political scientist for his work on health politics, popular participation, morality in politics, and on political development
Fields Medal winning mathematician, MacArthur Fellow
Professor of Applied Mathematics
composer
Professor of Music (retired)
historian of mathematics
Professor of the History of Mathematics
coauthor of Foundations of Differential Geometry (1963, 1969)
Professor of Mathematics (1960–1995)
philosopher, authored The Fragility of Goodness while teaching at Brown
Professor of Philosophy (1985~1995)
Norwegian-born physicist who taught at Brown (1928–1933); Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1968 awarded for Onsager reciprocal relations, produced while at Brown but was not tenured.
conductor, composer, and world's leading scholar on the music of author Anthony Burgess.
Professor of Music and Director of Orchestras and Chamber Music
Professor of the History of Mathematics and of Classics, MacArthur Fellow (1981)
President of the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis (1998–Present); Served on Reagan's White House Council of Economic Advisors[116]
Herbert H. Goldberger Professor of Economics (1974–1998)
Professor of Classics and History
President, Modern Language Association; author, The Rise and Fall of English; co-author, The Nature of Narrative
Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emeritus of Modern Culture and Media
author of well-known computer science book Algorithms; board of directors, Adobe Systems
Professor of Computer Science (1975~85)
computer scientist, best known for algorithmic research in combinatorial optimization and artificial intelligence
Nobel Prize in Economics, for developing empirical and scientific methods into economic research.
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for discovering the genetic bases of immunological reactions
Teacher in Biology (1930~1931)
Number theorist, co-founder of NTRU Cryptosystems, Inc.
Professor of Mathematics
philosopher, epistemologist
Nobel Prize in Economics, on the influence of government regulation on the economy
Professor of Economics (1946~1947)
  • William J. Suggs
co-discoverer of PCC (pyridinium chlorochromate), nick-named in Organic Chemistry as 'Corey's reagent'
  • Leslie Thornton
experimental filmmaker, Peggy and Fred in Hell
Professor of Modern Culture and Media
philosopher
Visiting Professor in Theology
computer graphics and hypertext pioneer, and co-founder of ACM SICGRAPH, precursor to SIGGRAPH
Thomas J. Watson, Jr. University Professor of Technology and Education,
Professor of Computer Science, former (and first) Vice President for Research
An Wang Professor of Computer Science, Jefferson Fellow, and theoretical computer science researcher.
Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, How I Learned to Drive
Adele Kellenberg Seaver Professor of English
  • Xu Wenli
founder of the Chinese Democratic Party
Visiting Senior Fellow in International Studies
author of multiple books including Digital Government and Cross Talk; developer of website www.InsidePolitics.org; vice president and director of governance studies at the Brookings Institution[117]
John Hazen White Professor of Public Policy and Political Science and director of the A. Alfred Taubman Center for Public Policy
writer (two time PEN/Faulkner Award winner), Philadelphia Fire
Asa Messer Professor and Professor of Africana Studies and Literary Arts
Pulitzer Prize for History winner, The Radicalism of the American Revolution
Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History
poet, String Light; Macarthur fellowship winner (2004)
Israel J. Kapstein Professor of English
  • Charles Larmore
political philosopher, formerly a professor at the University of Chicago School of Law, famous for critique of Rawlsian liberalism.
Duncan Macmillian Professor of Philosophy
  • Lucy Spelman (A.B. 1985)
famous primatologist, former director of the Washington Zoo and editor of The Rhino with Glue-on Shoes

Presidents of Brown University[edit]

Trustees of Brown University[edit]

  • Frank E. Winsor (Ph.B. 1892, A.M. 1896, Sc.D. 1929) Civil Engineer
  • Alain J.P. Belda Chairman of the Board & CEO of Alcoa
  • Thomas W. Berry (A.B. 1969, Brown; M.B.A., Harvard Graduate School of Business) Investment Banker
  • Mark S. Blumenkranz (A.B., M.S. 1976, M.D. 1976, Brown) Chairman of Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford School of Medicine
  • Julie N. Brown
  • James J. Burke, Jr. (A.B. 1973, Brown; M.B.A. 1979, Harvard Graduate School of Business) Investment Banker, Stonington Partners
  • Spencer R. Crew (A.B. 1971, M.A. 1973, Ph.D. 1979, Brown) CEO, National Underground Railroad Center
  • Charles M. Davis (A.B. 1982) Chairman & CEO, Fandango
  • Cornelia Dean (A.B., magna cum laude, 1969, Brown; M.A. 1981, Boston University) Science Editor, New York Times
  • Katherine G. Farley (A.B. 1971, Brown; M.Arch. 1976, Harvard Graduate School of Design) Senior Managing Director, Tishman Speyer
  • Richard Friedman (A.B. 1979, Brown; M.B.A. 1981, University of Chicago) Co-Head of Merchant Banking, Goldman Sachs & Co.
  • Fredric B. Garonzik (A.B. 1964, Brown) Advisory Director, Goldman Sachs Group
  • Martin J. Granoff (L.H.D. Honoris causa 2006, Brown) Textile company owner
  • Cathy Frank Halstead (B.A., New York University) President, Sideny Frank Importing Co.
  • Galen V. Henderson (M.D. 1993, Brown) Professor in Neurology, Harvard Medical School
  • H. Anthony Ittleson (A.B. 1960, Brown) Chairman & President, The Ittleson Foundation
  • Bobby Jindal (Sc.B. 1992, Brown) Governor, Louisiana
  • Debra L. Lee (A.B. 1976, Brown; M.P.P. 1980, Harvard Kennedy School of Government; J.D. Harvard Law School) President & COO, BET Holdings, Inc.
  • Karen M. Levy (A.B., honors, Brown; J.D. 1977, New York University School of Law)
  • Frederick Lippitt (A.B. 1939, Yale; J.D. 1946, Yale Law School) Political figure and philanthropist
  • Matthew J. Mallow (A.B. 1964, Brown; J.D. 1967, New York University) Partner, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom
  • Samuel M. Mencoff (A.B. 1978, Brown) Partner, Madison Dearborn Partners, Inc.
  • Annette L. Nazareth (A.B. 1978, Brown) United States Securities & Exchange Commission commissioner
  • Srihari S. Naidu (Sc.B. 1993, Brown; M.D. 1997, Brown) Director, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Treatment Center, Winthrop University Hospital
  • Jonathan M. Nelson (A.B. 1977, Brown) CEO, Providence Equity Partners, Inc.
  • Kenneth J. O'Keefe (A.B. 1976, Brown)
  • George S. Parker II (A.B. 1951, Brown) CEO/President of the Parker Pen Company 1966–86; besides being a trustee of Brown, also a trustee of Wisconsin's Beloit College.
  • Theresia G. Ranzetta (A.B. 1990, Brown) Managing Partner, Accel Partners
  • Alison S. Ressler (A.B., magna cum laude, 1980, Brown; J.D. 1983, Columbia University Law School) Partner, Sullivan & Cromwell
  • Carmen Garcia Rodriguez (A.B. 1983, Brown; J.D. 1986, Columbia University School of Law)
  • Eric L. Rodriguez (A.B. 2008, Brown) Political Advisor
  • Hannelore Rodriguez-Farrar (A.B. 1987, A.M. 1990, Brown) Ph.D. candidate, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Ralph F. Rosenberg (A.B. 1986, Brown) Managing Partner, R6 Capital Management
  • Charles M. Royce (A.B. 1961, Brown; M.B.A. 1963, Columbia University) President & Chief Investment Officer, Royce & Associates, LLC
  • Eileen M. Rudden (A.B. 1972, Brown) Technology Sector Advisor
  • Joan Wernig Sorensen (A.B. 1972, Brown) Development and Public Relations
  • Laurinda Hope Spear (B.F.A. 1972, Brown) Architect
  • Anita V. Spivey (A.B. 1974, Brown; J.D. Georgetown) Attorney
  • Barry Sternlicht (A.B., magna cum laude with honors, 1960, Brown; M.B.A., with distinction, Harvard Business School) Chairman & CEO, Starwood Capital Group
  • Marta Tienda (B.A. 1972, Michigan State University; Ph.D. 1977, University of Texas-Austin) Maurice P. During '22 Professor in Demographic Studies & Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Princeton University
  • Thomas J. Tisch (A.B. 1976, Brown; J.D. 1979, New York University) Managing Partner, Four Partners
  • Ambassador William H. Twaddell (A.B. 1963, Brown)
  • Jerome C. Vascellaro (A.B. 1974, Brown; M.B.A., Harvard Business School) Partner, Texas Pacific Group
  • Peter S. Voss (A.B. 1968, Brown) Chairman & CEO, IXIS Asset Management Group
  • William P. Wood (A.B. 1978, Brown) Co-founder, Austin Ventures

Honoris Causa Laureates[edit]

Fictitious alumni and faculty[edit]

  • Josiah Carberry – Professor of Psychoceramics (the study of cracked pots), who was created as a joke in 1929 and who has become a tradition at Brown. On every Friday the 13th, cracked pots are left around the Brown campus for students to deposit their pocket change. The money goes to support the Brown University library. Traditionally, Brown alums everywhere send their pocket change to the library on Friday the 13th. There is an organization of alums called "Friends of Josiah" that meets for dinner on the Brown campus on Friday the 13th.
  • Sean Alvarez, (played by Andre DaSilva), honest stock broker and murder victim on Law & Order, 2000 episode "Trade This" (season 11),[118] produced by Jeffrey L. Hayes, Brown '66.
  • Sabrina Anderson / Sabrina Jordan, (played by Spencer Locke) – young woman held hostage during a robbery who, as a result, must enter witness protection and will not be able to go to Brown where her old friends will recognize her, on In Plain Sight – 2010 (season 3) episode "WitSec Stepmother"[119]
  • Sam Arsenault, (played by James Naughton, Brown '67) – guest villain on Damages (2006–7). In one episode, he sings Danny Boy at a cocktail party, telling the guests he sang it with the Jabberwocks when he was an undergraduate student at Brown. Jim was, in fact, a member of the Jabberwocks when he was an undergraduate at Brown.
  • Ann August (played by Natalie Portman) – central character in Anywhere but Here; daughter of Adele August (played by Susan Sarandon). Ann applies and is accepted to Brown, much to her mother's dismay over the distance.
  • Cliff Calley, (played by Mark Feuerstein) – Senate Majority Counsel on The West Wing.[120]
  • ClippyMicrosoft Office Assistant represented as an animated paperclip, who, according to his résumé, has a degree in artsemiotics from Brown, where he "graduated cum laude with a performing arts thesis that involved twisting myself into a representation of Michelangelo's David"
  • Laura Donnellon, (played by Tracy Lynn Middendorf) – guest drug addict who drops out of Brown on The Guardian (TV series), episode Hazel Park, in 2003.
  • Amy Gardner (played by Mary-Louise Parker) – women's rights activist and later Chief of Staff to the First Lady Abbey Bartlet in the television series The West Wing. Gardner was asked by the First Lady where she got "such a smart mouth", to which Gardner quickly replied "Brown."
  • Brian Griffin (voiced by Seth MacFarlane) – erudite, alcoholic dog from the animated television series Family Guy; dropped out one class short of graduating; re-enrolls and fails in the episode "Brian Goes Back to College"
  • Joy - the wealthy nomad Don Draper meets in Mad Men: "The Jet Set" (season 2, episode 11) took a literature survey course at Pembroke College
  • Lucy Kelso (played by Sandra Bullock)- protagonist is a liberal lawyer who specializes in environmental law in New York City and is hired by an immature billionaire who needs a Chief Counsel who not only file briefs but help with every little aspect of his life. She and Meryl Brooks have known each other since "Brownie days."
  • Nick Mercer (played by Dermot Mulroney) – a male escort hired by Kat Ellis (played by Debra Messing) to be her date to her sister's wedding in the film The Wedding Date. Mercer graduated from Brown with a degree in Comparative Literature.
  • Otto Mann (voiced by Harry Shearer) – bus driver from the animated television series The Simpsons, who claims to have almost received tenure as a professor at Brown in one of Lisa Simpson's dream sequences
  • Imani Morehouse (played by Nicole Beharie) – district attorney on The Good Wife (TV series)
  • Jack Morgan – lead detective in the Private detective series written by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro.
  • Jonathan "Mox" Moxon (played by James Van Der Beek) – main character of the film Varsity Blues, the tormented replacement quarterback for his small-town Texas high school football team must devote himself to football and become a hero despite just wanting to sit on the bench and read Kurt Vonnegut. Receives acceptance to Brown, but his coach blackmails him to play football by threatening to ruin his transcript
  • Michael O'Neal (played by Dermot Mulroney) – main character of the film My Best Friend's Wedding. Dermot Mulroney played another fictitious Brown graduate, Nick Mercer, in the film The Wedding Date. Maybe Brown should give him an honorary degree?
  • Julianne Potter (played by Julia Roberts) – main character of the film My Best Friend's Wedding and her "best friend" Michael O'Neal (played by Dermot Mulroney), who met and made their marriage pact while attending Brown
  • Audrey Raines (played by Kim Raver) – Jack Bauer's lover and Inter-Agency Liaison in the U.S. Department of Defense in the television series 24; earned an A.M. in public policy from Brown
  • Elliot Reid in the television series Scrubs; revealed in the episode "My Turf War" that she and her sorority sister Melody O'Hara attended Brown
  • Monica Reyes (played by Annabeth Gish) – FBI Special agent in the television series The X-Files, who studied folklore and mythology at Brown
  • Andrea Sachs – The main character in the 2003 novel The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger. However, in the film version, Sachs is a graduate of Northwestern University.
  • Ryder Smith (played by George Hamilton) – leading man in Where the Boys Are a 1960 movie about spring break in Ft Lauderdale, shown during exam week on the Brown campus.
  • Jessica Stein (played by Jennifer Westfeldt) – titular character of the film Kissing Jessica Stein
  • Eileen Stevens – mom on Even Stevens
  • Jaye Tyler (played by Caroline Dhavernas) – snarky souvenir store clerk and main character of the television series Wonderfalls, who studied philosophy at Brown
  • Bridget "Bee" Vreeland – from the novel series Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
  • Bill Wentz (played by Jack Noseworthy) – U.S. Navy radioman in the film U-571, who studied German at Brown
  • Seth Cohen (played by Adam Brody) and his girlfriend Summer Roberts (played by Rachel Bilson) – in the television series The O.C. both applied to Brown and had interviews with the admissions officer from Brown. In a few episodes, both were seen competing to gain more extracurricular activities to add to their C.V. hopefully to increase their chances to Brown. Ultimately however, Seth was rejected and Summer was accepted.
  • Linda (played by Marisa Tomei) and Andrew (played by Allen Covert) are Brown alums in the movie Anger Management. Linda is Adam Sandler's girlfriend, and Andrew has been Linda's best friend since they dated at Brown. Andrew emasculates Sandler by forcing him to admit that he attended Trenton Community College, asking "where did you go to school again?" In another scene, Andrew tells Linda that "I rented out the entire sports bar. I thought it would be fun if it was just us Brown alums." He also tries to drum up their old romance by saying, "Do you remember back at Brown when we went up to see the Red Sox game?" In the movie, Sandler describes a Red Sox bra as "represent[ing] everything that I hate." Jack Nicholson, whose character went to Columbia University, reinforces the New York v. New England/Brown motif when he tells Sandler "Andrew is gonna try and recreate those hotsy-totsy nights up at Brown U."
  • As Good as It GetsJack Nicholson's publicist mentions her son got into Brown. Nicholson is indifferent because he has an antisocial personality.
  • Bill Buchanan from the TV series 24 has an English degree from Brown.
  • George Gammell Angell, great-uncle of the narrator of HP Lovecraft's The Call of Cthulhu, professor of Semitic Languages at Brown University.
  • Marina Thwaite, Danielle Minkoff and Julian Clarke, characters from Claire Messud's 2006 novel The Emperor's Children, were all friends at Brown University.
  • In the CW TV show Gossip Girl episode entitled "Poison Ivy", Serena van der Woodsen's (Blake Lively) mother attended Brown University. Her father went to Harvard University.
  • Christine Everhart (played by Leslie Bibb), 2008 Iron Man film: A Vanity Fair columnist who questions and interrogates Stark about his weapons industry, claiming that his company is killing people. Stark asks if she attended Berkeley, but she corrects him and says "Brown, actually." Later, she appears again, to tell Stark of the Ten Rings in Gulmira and at the end, suspecting Stark of being Iron Man.
  • In Hamlet 2, the main character, a drama teacher assumes a Latino student is a gangster. In actuality, his father is an accomplished author and he gained early admission to Brown.
  • Nora Clark (played by Jenna Dewan) – in the movie Step Up (film), Nora reveals to Tyler Gage (played by Channing Tatum) that she had been accepted to Brown University, but tells him she does not want to go and wants to pursue her passion for dancing instead.
  • Nell Kellner (played by Tricia Vessey) – in the movie Coming Soon, Nell gets accepted to Brown University at the end of the film when she reveals that her father had donated a large sum of money to the school.
  • Donna Keppel (played by Brittany Snow) – protagonist of the movie Prom Night (2008 film) was accepted to Brown, but has doubts of going because of being separated from her boyfriend.
  • Eric van der Woodsen – in the book series Gossip Girl written by Cecily von Ziegesar, Eric is a student at Brown University.
  • Norah Silverberg (played by Kat Dennings) – female protagonist and love interest of Nick O'Leary (played by Michael Cera) in the movie Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist; she tells Nick she was accepted to Brown University.
  • Courtney, April and Monica – in the movie Ninja Cheerleaders, Courtney (played by Trishelle Cannatella), April (played by Ginny Weirick) and Monica (played by Maitland McConnell) get accepted to Brown and attend the school at the end of the film.
  • Jane Weston (played by Amy Smart) – in the movie Outside Providence (film), Jane gets accepted to Brown University and attends the school at the end of the film.
  • Nick Lipton (played by Zach Braff, making his feature film debut) – in the movie Manhattan Murder Mystery. Nick is the son of protagonists Larry Lipton (played by Woody Allen) and Carol Lipton (played by Diane Keaton), and makes a brief appearance when he visits his parents over a college break.
  • Sophie Hall (played by Amanda Seyfried) – in the movie Letters to Juliet, Sophie tells Charlie Wyman, played by Chris Egan, that she went to Brown and she double majored with a minor in Latin (Brown does not offer minors, only concentrations).
  • Turanga Munda, the mother of the character Turanga Leela in Futurama, has a degree in exolinguistics from Brown[121] In the episode Zapp Dingbat, it was stated that Leela's father Morris also attended the University.
  • In a Foghorn Leghorn cartoon called Raw! Raw! Rooster!, a character named Rhode Island Red sings, "Who got kicked from Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and Brown?"
  • In a [[Futurama]] episode called [[The Mutants Are Revolting]], Brown University lies in the sewers of New New York and is called an "institution of lower learning." [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Edward Guiliano". nyit.edu. Retrieved 28 April 2014. 
  2. ^ Scott Trafton, Egypt Land, Duke University Press, 2004, pp 269. ISBN 0-8223-3362-7, ISBN 978-0-8223-3362-3
  3. ^ "James MacAlister papers". Drexel University Archives and Special Collections. November 16, 2005. Retrieved 2008-02-24. [dead link]
  4. ^ a b "Philip Allen". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Henry B. Anthony". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "Donald Carcieri". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  7. ^ "Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee". Rhode Island Office of the Secretary of State. Retrieved November 7, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Samuel Cony". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  9. ^ "Elisha Dyer". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  10. ^ "Elisha Dyer, Jr". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  11. ^ "James Fenner". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  12. ^ "Theodore Francis Green". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  13. ^ http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/current-governors/col2-content/main-content-list/maggie-hassan.html
  14. ^ "Charles Evans Hughes". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  15. ^ "Charles Jackson". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  16. ^ "Piyush "Bobby" Jindal". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  17. ^ "Otto Kerner, Jr.". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  18. ^ "William L. Marcy". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Jack A. Markell". National Governors Association. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
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