List of Bulgarians

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Famous or notable Bulgarians include:

Bulgarian monarchs[edit]

Performing arts[edit]

Directors[edit]

Actors and actresses[edit]

See also List of Bulgarian actors and actresses

Dancers[edit]

Journalists[edit]

Television[edit]

TV hosts[edit]

TV News presenters[edit]

Showmen[edit]

Literature[edit]

Authors[edit]

Theory of Literature[edit]

Music[edit]

Composers[edit]

See also List of Bulgarian composers

Singers and musicians[edit]

See also List of Bulgarian musicians and singers

Visual arts[edit]

Photogrphers[edit]

Sculptors[edit]

Graphic artists[edit]

Painters[edit]

Architects[edit]

Cartoonists[edit]

Arts Curators[edit]

Business[edit]

Businessmen[edit]

State[edit]

Politicians[edit]

Revolutionaries[edit]

Voivodes[edit]

Academicians[edit]

Scientists[edit]

Economists[edit]

Political Scientists[edit]

Philosophers[edit]

Sports[edit]

Athletics[edit]

Boxing[edit]

  • Daisy Lang - A female boxer. A world champion in 3 different weight categories.
  • Georgi Kostadinov - boxer, won the Olympic Flyweight gold medal at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games for Bulgaria
  • Ivailo Marinov - boxer, won the Olympic Flyweight gold medal at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games, among others
  • Svilen Rusinov - boxer

Kubrat Pulev - boxer Tervel Pulev - boxer

Chess[edit]

Volleyball[edit]

Football[edit]

See also List of Bulgarian footballers

Tennis[edit]

Other sports[edit]

Theology[edit]

Cuisine[edit]

Notorious criminals[edit]

See also Bulgarian mafia

Assassinated 1995[edit]

Assassinated 2003[edit]

Assassinated 2005[edit]

Assassinated 2008[edit]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Multiple citizenship status - Bulgaria and Republic of Macedonia.
  2. ^ "Even the famous leader of the Macedonian revolutionaries, Gotse Delchev, openly said that “We are Bulgarians” and addressed “the Slavs of Macedonia as ‘Bulgarians’ in an offhanded manner without seeming to indicate that such a designation was a point of contention”; See:The Macedonian Conflict: Ethnic Nationalism in a Transnational World, Loring M. Danforth, Editor: Princeton University Press, 1997, ISBN 0-691-04356-6,p. 64.
  3. ^ "…Goce Delchev and the other leaders of the BMORK were aware of Serbian and Greek ambitions in Macedonia. More important, they were aware that neither Belgrade nor Athens could expect to obtain the whole of Macedonia and, unlike Bulgaria, looked forward to and urged partition of this land. Autonomy, then, was the best prophylactic against partition – a prophylactic that would preserve the Bulgarian character of Macedonia's Christian population despite the separation from Bulgaria proper…" See: The Macedoine, (pp. 307-328 in of "The National Question in Yugoslavia. Origins, History, Politics" by Ivo Banac, Cornell University Press, 1984)

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