List of Chicago Bulls seasons

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interior view of United Center
The United Center has been home to the Bulls since 1994.

The Chicago Bulls are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Chicago, Illinois. Dick Klein founded the Bulls in 1966 after a number of other professional basketball teams in Chicago had failed.[1][a] In their 47 seasons, the Bulls have achieved a winning record 23 times, and have appeared in the NBA playoffs 32 times.[4] They received international recognition in the 1990s when All-Star shooting guard Michael Jordan led them to their six league championships.[5] The only NBA franchises that have won more championships than the Bulls are the Boston Celtics (17 championships) and Los Angeles Lakers (16).[6]

The Bulls initially competed in the NBA's Western Division. The Western Division was renamed the Western Conference in 1970, and was split into the Midwest and Pacific Divisions. The Bulls played in the Midwest Division until 1980, when they moved to the Central Division of the Eastern Conference.[4]

History of the Bulls[edit]

Early years[edit]

During their inaugural season (1966–67), the Bulls compiled a 33–48 record under coach Johnny "Red" Kerr and reached the playoffs. This was the best record achieved by an NBA expansion team in its first year of play, a feat which earned Kerr the NBA Coach of the Year Award. Dick Motta replaced Kerr in 1969, and under his leadership, the Bulls appeared in the playoffs every year from 1970 to 1975. The team reached the Western Conference Finals in 1974 and 1975, but lost to the Milwaukee Bucks and Golden State Warriors, respectively. Key players during the Motta era included Jerry Sloan, Bob Love, Chet Walker, Norm Van Lier, and Tom Boerwinkle.[7]

The Bulls qualified for the playoffs just twice between 1976 and 1984, a period in which the team used eight different head coaches, including former player Jerry Sloan.[8] They had a chance to win the first pick of the 1979 NBA Draft, which would have allowed them to select future Hall of Famer Magic Johnson. However, they lost a coin flip to the Los Angeles Lakers, and went on to choose David Greenwood with the second pick. Although Greenwood averaged 12.6 points over six seasons with the Bulls, he never became an NBA All-Star.[9]

Jordan era[edit]

Michael Jordan preparing to dunk the basketball
Michael Jordan led the Bulls to their six championships.

The Bulls' luck turned for the better after selecting Michael Jordan with the third overall pick in the 1984 NBA Draft.[7] Now considered one of the greatest basketball players of all time,[10] Jordan averaged 28.2 points per game during his first season and received the 1985 NBA Rookie of the Year Award. From 1985 onwards, the Bulls reached the playoffs every season he was on the team's roster. However, Jordan could not lead the Bulls past the first round of the playoffs by himself, so in 1987, general manager Jerry Krause acquired Scottie Pippen and Horace Grant at that summer's draft. These two young forwards could complement Jordan with their scoring, defense, and rebounding. In 1989, the Bulls played in their first conference finals series since 1975, losing to the Detroit Pistons. Coach Phil Jackson joined the Bulls after that season, and in 1991, the team won their first of three consecutive NBA championships by defeating Magic Johnson and the Lakers.[7]

Jordan suddenly retired from basketball in October 1993 and embarked upon a career in minor league baseball. Although the Bulls signed European standout Toni Kukoč to help alleviate the loss, they could not extend their championship streak, falling to the New York Knicks in the 1994 Eastern Conference Semifinals. The Bulls then lost Horace Grant, who signed with the Orlando Magic as a free agent during the summer of 1994.[7] However, Jordan returned to the Bulls in March 1995, and with the added help of rebounding specialist Dennis Rodman, the team won three more championships from 1996 to 1998.[10] The 1995–96 Bulls won a record 72 regular season games (out of 82)[11] and are widely regarded as one of the greatest teams in NBA history.[12]

Post-Jordan era[edit]

After the Bulls won their sixth championship, Phil Jackson decided to leave the team and spend some time away from basketball. Michael Jordan then announced his second retirement, which prompted general manager Jerry Krause to begin rebuilding the roster with younger athletes. Six players from the 1997–98 Bulls (Scottie Pippen, Dennis Rodman, Steve Kerr, Luc Longley, Jud Buechler,[7] and Scott Burrell[13]) joined other teams through free agency or sign-and-trade deals, and with few established players left on the roster, the Bulls missed the 1999 playoffs. This began a six-year playoff drought, the longest such drought in team history.[7]

The Bulls showed signs of improvement after hiring coach Scott Skiles in 2003, reaching the playoffs in 2005, 2006, and 2007. Some of the primary contributors on those teams were Ben Gordon, Luol Deng, and Kirk Hinrich.[7] The Bulls' new playoff streak ended in 2008, when the team finished fourth in their division with a 33–49 record. After the season, the team hired a new coach, Vinny Del Negro.[14] The Bulls' poor record did help them win the 2008 NBA Draft Lottery, which allowed them to select Derrick Rose with the first pick in the NBA Draft.[15][16] They made the 2009 NBA Playoffs, only to lose in a seven-game series against the Boston Celtics which included a record seven overtime periods.[17] In 2010, Del Negro was replaced by Tom Thibodeau, and the Bulls reached the 2011 Eastern Conference Finals, losing to the Miami Heat in five games.[18]

Table key[edit]

Derrick Rose holds a basketball
Derrick Rose was drafted by the Bulls in 2008.
AMVP All-Star Game Most Valuable Player
COY Coach of the Year
DPOY Defensive Player of the Year
Finish Final position in league or division standings
GB Games behind first-place team in division[b]
Italics Season in progress
Losses Number of regular season losses
EOY Executive of the Year
FMVP Finals Most Valuable Player
MVP Most Valuable Player
ROY Rookie of the Year
SIX Sixth Man of the Year
SPOR Sportsmanship Award
Wins Number of regular season wins

Seasons[edit]

Note: Statistics are correct as of May 15, 2013.

NBA champions dagger Conference champions * Division champions ^ Playoff berth #
Season Conference Finish[c] Division Finish[c] Wins[d] Losses[d] Win% GB Playoffs Awards Head coach
1966–67 Western 4th # 33 48 .407 11 Lost Division Semifinals to St. Louis Hawks, 3–0[19] Johnny Kerr
(COY)[7]
Johnny Kerr
1967–68 Western 4th # 29 53 .354 27 Lost Division Semifinals to Los Angeles Lakers, 4–1[20] Johnny Kerr
1968–69 Western 5th 33 49 .402 22 Dick Motta
1969–70 Western 3rd[e] # 39 43 .476 9 Lost Division Semifinals to Atlanta Hawks, 4–1[22] Dick Motta
1970–71 Western 3rd # Midwest[f] 2nd 51 31 .622 2 Lost Conference Semifinals to Los Angeles Lakers, 4–3[23] Dick Motta
(COY)[7]
Dick Motta
1971–72 Western 3rd # Midwest 2nd 57 25 .695 6 Lost Conference Semifinals to Los Angeles Lakers, 4–0[24] Dick Motta
1972–73 Western 3rd # Midwest 2nd 51 31 .622 9 Lost Conference Semifinals to Los Angeles Lakers, 4–3[25] Dick Motta
1973–74 Western 3rd # Midwest 2nd 54 28 .659 9 Won Conference Semifinals vs. Detroit Pistons, 4–3
Lost Conference Finals to Milwaukee Bucks, 4–0[26]
Dick Motta
1974–75 Western 2nd # Midwest ^ 1st ^ 47 35 .573 Won Conference Semifinals vs. Kansas City-Omaha Kings, 4–2
Lost Conference Finals to Golden State Warriors, 4–3[27]
Dick Motta
1975–76 Western 9th Midwest 4th 24 58 .293 14 Dick Motta
1976–77 Western 6th # Midwest 3rd[g] 44 38 .537 6 Lost First Round to Portland Trail Blazers, 2–1[29] Ed Badger
1977–78 Western 8th Midwest 3rd 40 42 .488 8 Ed Badger
1978–79 Western 11th Midwest 5th 31 51 .378 17 Larry Costello
Scotty Robertson
1979–80 Western 9th Midwest 4th[h] 30 52 .366 19 Jerry Sloan
1980–81 Eastern 5th # Central[i] 2nd 45 37 .549 15 Won First Round vs. New York Knicks, 2–0
Lost Conference Semifinals to Boston Celtics, 4–0[31]
Jerry Sloan
1981–82 Eastern 9th Central 5th 34 48 .415 21 Jerry Sloan
Phil Johnson
Rod Thorn
1982–83 Eastern 9th Central 4th 28 54 .341 23 Paul Westhead
1983–84 Eastern 10th Central 5th 27 55 .329 23 Kevin Loughery
1984–85 Eastern 7th # Central 3rd 38 44 .463 21 Lost First Round to Milwaukee Bucks, 3–1[32] Michael Jordan
(ROY)[7]
Kevin Loughery
1985–86 Eastern 8th # Central 4th 30 52 .366 27 Lost First Round to Boston Celtics, 3–0[33] Stan Albeck
1986–87 Eastern 8th # Central 5th 40 42 .488 17 Lost First Round to Boston Celtics, 3–0[34] Doug Collins
1987–88 Eastern 3rd # Central 2nd[j] 50 32 .610 4 Won First Round vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, 3–2
Lost Conference Semifinals to Detroit Pistons, 4–1[36]
Jerry Krause (EOY)
Michael Jordan
(AMVP, DPOY, & MVP)[7][37]
Doug Collins
1988–89 Eastern 6th # Central 5th 47 35 .573 16 Won First Round vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, 3–2
Won Conference Semifinals vs. New York Knicks, 4–2
Lost Conference Finals to Detroit Pistons, 4–2[38]
Doug Collins
1989–90 Eastern 3rd # Central 2nd 55 27 .671 4 Won First Round vs. Milwaukee Bucks, 3–1
Won Conference Semifinals vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 4–1
Lost Conference Finals to Detroit Pistons, 4–3[39]
Phil Jackson
1990–91 dagger Eastern * 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 61 21 .744 Won First Round vs. New York Knicks, 3–0
Won Conference Semifinals vs. Philadelphia 76ers, 4–1
Won Conference Finals vs. Detroit Pistons, 4–0
Won NBA Finals vs. Los Angeles Lakers, 4–1[40] dagger
Michael Jordan
(FMVP & MVP)[7]
Phil Jackson
1991–92 dagger Eastern * 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 67 15 .817 Won First Round vs. Miami Heat, 3–0
Won Conference Semifinals vs. New York Knicks, 4–3
Won Conference Finals vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, 4–2
Won NBA Finals vs. Portland Trail Blazers, 4–2[41] dagger
Michael Jordan
(FMVP & MVP)[7]
Phil Jackson
1992–93 dagger Eastern * 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 57 25 .695 Won First Round vs. Atlanta Hawks, 3–0
Won Conference Semifinals vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, 4–0
Won Conference Finals vs. New York Knicks, 4–2
Won NBA Finals vs. Phoenix Suns, 4–2[42] dagger
Michael Jordan
(FMVP)[7]
Phil Jackson
1993–94 Eastern 3rd # Central 2nd 55 27 .671 2 Won First Round vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, 3–0
Lost Conference Semifinals to New York Knicks, 4–3[43]
Scottie Pippen
(AMVP)[7]
Phil Jackson
1994–95 Eastern 5th # Central 3rd 47 35 .573 5 Won First Round vs. Charlotte Hornets, 3–1
Lost Conference Semifinals to Orlando Magic, 4–2[44]
Phil Jackson
1995–96 dagger Eastern * 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 72 10 .878 Won First Round vs. Miami Heat, 3–0
Won Conference Semifinals vs. New York Knicks, 4–1
Won Conference Finals vs. Orlando Magic, 4–0
Won NBA Finals vs. Seattle SuperSonics, 4–2[45] dagger
Phil Jackson (COY)
Jerry Krause (EOY)
Michael Jordan
(AMVP, FMVP, & MVP)
Toni Kukoč (SIX)
[7][37]
Phil Jackson
1996–97 dagger Eastern * 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 69 13 .841 Won First Round vs. Washington Bullets, 3–0
Won Conference Semifinals vs. Atlanta Hawks, 4–1
Won Conference Finals vs. Miami Heat, 4–1
Won NBA Finals vs. Utah Jazz, 4–2[46] dagger
Michael Jordan
(FMVP)[7]
Phil Jackson
1997–98 dagger Eastern * 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 62 20 .756 Won First Round vs. New Jersey Nets, 3–0
Won Conference Semifinals vs. Charlotte Hornets, 4–1
Won Conference Finals vs. Indiana Pacers, 4–3
Won NBA Finals vs Utah Jazz, 4–2[47] dagger
Michael Jordan
(AMVP, FMVP, & MVP)[7]
Phil Jackson
1998–99[k] Eastern 15th Central 8th 13 37 .260 20 Tim Floyd
1999–00 Eastern 15th Central 8th 17 65 .207 39 Elton Brand[l] (ROY)[7] Tim Floyd
2000–01 Eastern 15th Central 8th 15 67 .183 37 Tim Floyd
2001–02 Eastern 15th Central 8th 21 61 .256 29 Tim Floyd
Bill Berry
Bill Cartwright
2002–03 Eastern 12th Central 6th 30 52 .366 20 Bill Cartwright
2003–04 Eastern 14th Central 8th 23 59 .280 38 Bill Cartwright
Pete Myers
Scott Skiles
2004–05 Eastern 4th # Central 2nd 47 35 .573 7 Lost First Round to Washington Wizards 4–2[49] Ben Gordon (SIX)[7] Scott Skiles
2005–06 Eastern 7th # Central 4th[m] 41 41 .500 23 Lost First Round to Miami Heat 4–2[51] Scott Skiles
2006–07 Eastern 5th # Central 3rd 49 33 .598 4 Won First Round vs. Miami Heat, 4–0
Lost Conference Semifinals to Detroit Pistons, 4–2[52]
Luol Deng (SPOR)[7] Scott Skiles
2007–08 Eastern 11th Central 4th 33 49 .402 26 Scott Skiles
Pete Myers
Jim Boylan
2008–09 Eastern 7th # Central 2nd 41 41 .500 25 Lost First Round to Boston Celtics 4–3 Derrick Rose (ROY)[53] Vinny Del Negro
2009–10 Eastern 8th # Central 3rd 41 41 .500 20 Lost First Round to Cleveland Cavaliers 4–1 Vinny Del Negro
2010–11 Eastern 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 62 20 .756 Won First Round vs. Indiana Pacers 4–1
Won Conference Semifinals vs. Atlanta Hawks 4–2
Lost Conference Finals to Miami Heat 4–1
Tom Thibodeau (COY)[54]
Gar Forman (EOY)
Derrick Rose (MVP)[55]
Tom Thibodeau
2011–12[n] Eastern 1st # Central ^ 1st ^ 50 16 .758 Lost First Round to Philadelphia 76ers 4–2 Tom Thibodeau
2012–13 Eastern 5th # Central 2nd 45 37 .549 4 Won First Round vs. Brooklyn Nets 4–3
Lost Conference Semifinals to Miami Heat 4–1
Tom Thibodeau
2013–14 Eastern 4th # Central 2nd 48 34 .585 8 Pending Pending Tom Thibodeau

All-time records[edit]

Note: Statistics are correct as of May 15, 2013

Statistic Wins Losses Win%
Chicago Bulls regular season record (1966–2013) 1975 1830 .519
Chicago Bulls postseason record (1966–present) 177 144 .551
All-time regular and postseason record 2152 1974 .522

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Bulls' predecessors included the Chicago Bruins, the Chicago Studebaker Flyers, the Chicago American Gears, the Chicago Stags, the Chicago Majors, and the Chicago Packers (later renamed the Zephyrs). The Zephyrs moved to Baltimore and then Washington, D.C., and are now known as the Washington Wizards.[2][3]
  2. ^ The formula is as followed: \mathrm{Games}\ \mathrm{behind} = \frac{(\mathrm{Team A's}\ \mathrm{wins}-\mathrm{Team B's}\ \mathrm{wins}) + (\mathrm{Team B's}\ \mathrm{losses} - \mathrm{Team A's}\ \mathrm{losses})}{\mathrm{2}}
  3. ^ a b The Finish column lists regular season results and excludes postseason play.
  4. ^ a b The Wins and Losses columns list regular season results and exclude any postseason play. Regular and postseason records are combined only below the table.
  5. ^ Though the Bulls had the same record as the Phoenix Suns in the Western Division, the Bulls lost the tiebreaker and finished third.[21]
  6. ^ The Western Division was renamed the Western Conference and split into the Midwest and Pacific divisions.
  7. ^ Though the Bulls had the same record as the Detroit Pistons in the Midwest Division, the Bulls lost the tiebreaker and finished third.[28]
  8. ^ Though the Bulls had the same record as the Denver Nuggets in the Midwest Division, the Bulls lost the tiebreaker and finished fourth.[30]
  9. ^ In 1980, the Dallas Mavericks entered the NBA as an expansion team and joined the Midwest Division of the Western Conference. The Bulls then moved to the Central Division of the Eastern Conference.[7]
  10. ^ Though the Bulls had the same record as the Atlanta Hawks in the Central Division, the Bulls won the tiebreaker and finished second.[35]
  11. ^ Due to a lockout, the season did not start until February 5, 1999, and all 29 teams played a shortened 50 game regular season schedule.[48]
  12. ^ Brand shared Rookie of the Year honors with Steve Francis of the Houston Rockets.[7]
  13. ^ Though the Bulls had the same record as the Indiana Pacers in the Central Division, the Bulls lost the tiebreaker and finished fourth.[50]
  14. ^ Due to a lockout, the season did not start until December 25, 2011 and all 30 teams played a shortened 66 game regular season schedule.[56]

Sources[edit]

  • Sachare, Alex (1999). The Chicago Bulls Encyclopedia. Contemporary Books. ISBN 0-8092-2515-8. 
  • "Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  • "Playoff Index". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sachare, pp. 2–7.
  2. ^ Rude, Jeff (November 4, 1990). "Bulls 25: Ultimate Saga of Success". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 16. 
  3. ^ Sachare, pp. 2–5.
  4. ^ a b "Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  5. ^ "Jordan: A Career Of Highlights". CBS News. January 12, 1999. Retrieved October 1, 2008. 
  6. ^ "Playoff Index". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Chicago Bulls History". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  8. ^ Sachare, pp. 123–131.
  9. ^ Sachare, pp. 26–27.
  10. ^ a b "Michael Jordan". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive. Retrieved September 26, 2008. 
  11. ^ "Bulls Set Record With 70th Win". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive. Retrieved September 21, 2008. 
  12. ^ "Top 10 Teams in NBA History". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive. Retrieved September 5, 2008. 
  13. ^ "Scott Burrell Player Info". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive. Retrieved October 5, 2008. 
  14. ^ "Bulls, Suns assistant GM Del Negro agree on deal". ESPN.com. June 10, 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  15. ^ "Bulls to pick first in draft; Heat, Wolves round out Top 3". ESPN.com. May 21, 2008. Retrieved September 26, 2008. 
  16. ^ "Derrick Rose: Number 1 Draft Pick By Chicago Bulls". The Huffington Post. June 26, 2008. Retrieved July 2, 2008. 
  17. ^ "Celtics avoid overtime, advance past Bulls 109-99 in Game 7". USA Today. May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 3, 2009. 
  18. ^ Cowley, Joe (May 29, 2011). "MVP Rose, Thibodeau, Taj’s dunk stand out in Bulls’ season". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved May 29, 2011. 
  19. ^ "1966–67 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  20. ^ "1967–68 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  21. ^ "1969-70 NBA Season Summary". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  22. ^ "1969–70 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  23. ^ "1970–71 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  24. ^ "1971–72 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  25. ^ "1972–73 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  26. ^ "1973–74 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  27. ^ "1974–75 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  28. ^ "1976-77 NBA Season Summary". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  29. ^ "1976–77 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  30. ^ "1979-80 NBA Season Summary". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  31. ^ "1980–81 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  32. ^ "1984–85 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  33. ^ "1985–86 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  34. ^ "1986–87 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  35. ^ "1987-88 NBA Season Summary". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  36. ^ "1987–88 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  37. ^ a b "Chicago Bulls Retired Numbers". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive. Retrieved October 4, 2008. 
  38. ^ "1988–89 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  39. ^ "1989–90 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  40. ^ "1990–91 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  41. ^ "1991–92 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  42. ^ "1992–93 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  43. ^ "1993–94 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  44. ^ "1994–95 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  45. ^ "1995–96 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  46. ^ "1996–97 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  47. ^ "1997–98 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  48. ^ Donovan, John (February 4, 1999). "Let the semi-season begin: Expect injuries, intensity and a new champion in '99". CNN Sports Illustrated. Retrieved September 4, 2011. 
  49. ^ "2004–05 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  50. ^ "2005-06 NBA Season Summary". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  51. ^ "2005–06 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  52. ^ "2006–07 Chicago Bulls". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  53. ^ "Bulls' Rose claims Rookie of the Year honors". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Retrieved April 22, 2009. 
  54. ^ "Chicago's Tom Thibodeau named 2010-11 NBA Coach of the Year". NBA.com. May 1, 2011. Retrieved May 1, 2011. 
  55. ^ "Chicago's Derrick Rose Wins 2010-11 Kia NBA MVP Award". NBA.com. May 3, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2011. 
  56. ^ Beck, Howard (November 28, 2011). "Two Exhibition Games for N.B.A. Teams". The New York Times. Retrieved November 28, 2011.