List of Chicago Cubs seasons

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The following lists the results of every season of the Chicago Cubs professional baseball club of Major League Baseball, beginning from their inaugural season in 1871 as the Chicago White Stockings to the present. Initially, the White Stockings were part of the National Association, but after it folded in 1875 the White Stockings, along with other baseball teams at the time, established the National League. The White Stockings changed their name in 1890 to the Chicago Colts and again in 1898 to the Chicago Orphans until finally settling in 1902 with the name of the Chicago Cubs.

The Chicago Cubs have completed 142 seasons of professional baseball games, second only to the Atlanta Braves.[a] Within this time, the Cubs have won 16 National League pennants, 2 World Series Championships, and tied for 1 Pre-World Series Championship.

Further information: History of the Chicago Cubs

Year by year

World Series Champions
(1903–present)
NL Champions
(1876–present)[b]
Division Champions
(1969–present)
Wild Card Berth
(1994–present)
Season Team League Division Regular season Post-Season Awards
Finish[c] Wins[c] Losses[c] Win% GB[d]
Chicago White Stockings
1871 1871[e] NA 2nd 19 9 .679 2
1874 1874[f] NA 5th 28 31 .475 18.5
1875 1875 NA 6th 30 37 .448 35
1876 1876 NL 1st 52 14 .788 -
1877 1877 NL 5th 26 33 .441 15.5
1878 1878[g] NL 4th 30 30 .500 11
1879 1879 NL 4th 46 33 .582 10.5
1880 1880 NL 1st 67 17 .798 -
1881 1881 NL 1st 56 28 .667 -
1882 1882 NL 1st 55 29 .655 -
1883 1883 NL 2nd 59 39 .602 4
1884 1884 NL 5th 62 50 .554 22
1885 1885[h] NL 1st 87 25 .777 Tied Postseason Championship vs. St. Louis Browns, 3–3–1[i]
1886 1886 NL 1st 90 34 .726 - Lost Postseason Championship vs. St. Louis Browns, 4–2
1887 1887 NL 3rd 71 50 .587 6.5
1888 1888 NL 2nd 77 58 .570 9
1889 1889 NL 3rd 67 65 .508 19
Chicago Colts
1890 1890 NL 2nd 84 53 .613 6
1891 1891[j] NL 2nd 82 53 .607 3.5
1892 1892 NL 7th 70 76 .479 30
1893 1893[k] NL 9th 56 71 .441 29
1894 1894 NL 8th 57 75 .432 34
1895 1895 NL 4th 72 58 .554 15
1896 1896 NL 5th 71 57 .555 18.5
1897 1897 NL 9th 59 73 .447 34
Chicago Orphans
1898 1898 NL 4th 85 65 .567 17.5
1899 1899 NL 8th 75 73 .507 26
1900 1900 NL 6th 65 75 .464 19
1901 1901 NL 6th 53 86 .381 37
Chicago Cubs
1902 1902 NL 5th 68 69 .496 34
1903 1903 NL 3rd 82 56 .594 8
1904 1904 NL 2nd 93 60 .608 13
1905 1905 NL 3rd 92 61 .601 13
1906 1906 NL 1st 116 36 .763 - Lost World Series to Chicago White Sox, 2–4
1907 1907 NL 1st 107 45 .704 - Won World Series vs Detroit Tigers, 4–0–1
1908 1908 NL 1st 99 55 .643 - Won World Series vs Detroit Tigers, 4–1
1909 1909 NL 2nd 104 49 .680 6.5
1910 1910 NL 1st 104 50 .675 - Lost World Series to Philadelphia Athletics, 1–4
1911 1911 NL 2nd 92 62 .597 7.5 Frank Schulte (MVP)[2]
1912 1912 NL 3rd 91 59 .607 11.5
1913 1913 NL 3rd 88 65 .575 13.5
1914 1914 NL 4th 78 76 .506 16.5
1915 1915 NL 4th 73 80 .477 17.5
1916 1916[l] NL 5th 67 86 .438 26.5
1917 1917 NL 5th 74 80 .481 24
1918 1918 NL 1st 84 45 .651 - Lost World Series to Boston Red Sox, 2–4
1919 1919 NL 3rd 75 65 .536 21
1920 1920 NL 5th 75 79 .487 18
1921 1921 NL 7th 64 89 .418 30
1922 1922 NL 5th 80 74 .519 13
1923 1923 NL 4th 83 71 .539 12.5
1924 1924 NL 5th 81 72 .529 12
1925 1925 NL 8th 68 86 .442 27.5
1926 1926 NL 4th 82 72 .532 7
1927 1927 NL 4th 85 68 .556 8.5
1928 1928 NL 3rd 91 63 .591 4
1929 1929 NL 1st 98 54 .645 - Lost World Series to Philadelphia Athletics, 1–4 Rogers Hornsby (MVP)[2]
1930 1930 NL 2nd 90 64 .584 2
1931 1931 NL 3rd 84 70 .545 17
1932 1932 NL 1st 90 64 .584 - Lost World Series to New York Yankees, 0–4
1933 1933 NL 3rd 86 68 .558 6
1934 1934 NL 3rd 86 65 .570 8
1935 1935 NL 1st 100 54 .649 - Lost World Series to Detroit Tigers, 2–4 Gabby Hartnett (MVP)[2]
1936 1936 NL 2nd 87 67 .565 5
1937 1937 NL 2nd 93 61 .604 3
1938 1938 NL 1st 89 63 .586 - Lost World Series to New York Yankees, 0–4
1939 1939 NL 4th 84 70 .545 13
1940 1940 NL 5th 75 79 .487 25
1941 1941 NL 6th 70 84 .455 30
1942 1942 NL 6th 68 86 .442 38
1943 1943 NL 5th 74 79 .484 30.5
1944 1944 NL 4th 75 79 .487 30
1945 1945 NL 1st 98 56 .636 - Lost World Series to Detroit Tigers, 3–4 Phil Cavarretta (MVP)[2]
1946 1946 NL 3rd 82 71 .536 14.5
1947 1947 NL 6th 69 85 .448 25
1948 1948 NL 8th 64 90 .416 27.5
1949 1949 NL 8th 61 93 .396 36
1950 1950 NL 7th 64 89 .418 26.5
1951 1951 NL 8th 62 92 .403 34.5
1952 1952 NL 5th 77 77 .500 19.5 Hank Sauer (MVP)[2]
1953 1953 NL 7th 65 89 .422 40
1954 1954 NL 7th 64 90 .416 33
1955 1955 NL 6th 72 81 .471 26
1956 1956 NL 8th 60 94 .390 33
1957 1957 NL 7th 62 92 .403 33
1958 1958 NL 5th 72 82 .468 20 Ernie Banks (MVP)[2]
1959 1959 NL 5th 74 80 .481 13 Ernie Banks (MVP)[2]
1960 1960 NL 7th 60 94 .390 35
1961 1961 NL 7th 64 90 .416 29 Billy Williams (ROY)[3]
1962[m] 1962 NL 9th 59 103 .364 42.5 Ken Hubbs (ROY)[3]
1963 1963 NL 7th 82 80 .506 17
1964 1964 NL 8th 76 86 .469 17
1965 1965 NL 8th 72 90 .444 25
1966 1966 NL 10th 59 103 .364 36
1967 1967 NL 3rd 87 74 .540 14
1968 1968 NL 3rd 84 78 .519 13
1969 1969 NL East[n] 2nd 92 70 .568 8
1970 1970 NL East 2nd 84 78 .519 5
1971 1971 NL East 3rd 83 79 .512 14 Fergie Jenkins (CYA)[4]
1972[o] 1972 NL East 2nd 85 70 .548 11
1973 1973 NL East 5th 77 84 .478 5
1974 1974 NL East 6th 66 96 .407 22
1975 1975 NL East 5th 75 87 .463 17.5
1976 1976 NL East 4th 75 87 .463 26
1977 1977 NL East 4th 81 81 .500 20
1978 1978 NL East 3rd 79 83 .488 11
1979 1979 NL East 5th 80 82 .494 18 Bruce Sutter (CYA)[4]
1980 1980 NL East 6th 64 98 .395 27
1981 1981 NL East 6th 38 65 .369 21.5 [p]
1982 1982 NL East 5th 73 89 .451 19
1983 1983 NL East 5th 71 91 .438 19
1984 1984 NL East 1st 96 65 .596 - Lost NLCS to San Diego Padres, 2–3 Ryne Sandberg (MVP)[2]
Rick Sutcliffe (CYA)[4]
Jim Frey (MOY)[6]
1985 1985 NL East 4th 77 84 .478 23.5
1986 1986 NL East 5th 70 90 .438 37
1987 1987 NL East 6th 76 85 .472 18.5 Andre Dawson (MVP)[2]
1988 1988[q] NL East 4th 77 85 .475 24
1989 1989 NL East 1st 93 69 .574 - Lost NLCS to San Francisco Giants, 1–4 Jerome Walton (ROY)[3]
Don Zimmer (MOY)[6]
1990 1990 NL East 4th 77 85 .475 18
1991 1991 NL East 4th 77 83 .481 20
1992 1992 NL East 4th 78 84 .481 18 Greg Maddux (CYA)[4]
1993 1993 NL East 4th 84 78 .519 13
1994 1994 NL Central[r] 5th 49 64 .434 16.5 [s]
1995 1995 NL Central 3rd 73 71 .507 12
1996 1996 NL Central 4th 76 86 .469 12
1997 1997 NL Central 5th 68 94 .420 16
1998 1998 NL Central 2nd 90[t] 73 .552 12.5 Lost NLDS to Atlanta Braves, 0–3 Sammy Sosa (MVP)[2]
Kerry Wood (ROY)[3]
1999 1999 NL Central 6th 67 95 .414 30
2000 2000 NL Central 6th 65 97 .401 30
2001 2001 NL Central 3rd 88 74 .543 5
2002 2002 NL Central 5th 67 95 .414 30
2003 2003 NL Central 1st 88 74 .543 - Won NLDS vs Atlanta Braves, 3–2
Lost NLCS to Florida Marlins, 3–4
2004 2004 NL Central 3rd 89 73 .549 16
2005 2005 NL Central 4th 79 83 .488 21
2006 2006 NL Central 6th 66 96 .407 17.5
2007 2007 NL Central 1st 85 77 .525 - Lost NLDS to Arizona Diamondbacks, 0–3
2008 2008 NL Central 1st 97 64 .602 - Lost NLDS to Los Angeles Dodgers, 0–3 Geovany Soto (ROY)[3]
Lou Piniella (MOY)[6]
2009 2009 NL Central 2nd 83 78 .516 8.5
2010 2010 NL Central 5th 75 87 .463 16
2011 2011 NL Central 5th 71 91 .438 25
2012 2012 NL Central 5th 61 101 .377 36
2013 2013 NL Central 5th 66 96 .407 31
2014 2014 NL Central 5th 73 89 .451 17
Totals Wins Losses Win % Championships
National Association Regular season 77 77 .500
National League Regular season[u] 10372 9893 .512 16 National League Pennants
MLB Post-season[v] 28 55 .337 2 World Series Championships
All-Time Regular and Post-season Record 10477 10025 .511

Footnotes

  1. ^ Both the Chicago Cubs and the Atlanta Braves started in 1871, but Chicago was forced to cancel the 1872 and 1873 seasons due to the 1871 Great Chicago Fire.
  2. ^ For lists of all National League pennant winners see National League pennant winners 1876–1968 and National League Championship Series.
  3. ^ a b c The Finish, Wins, and Losses columns list regular season results and exclude any postseason play. Regular and postseason records are combined only at the bottom of the list.
  4. ^ The GB column lists "Games Back" from the team that finished in first place that season. It is determined by finding the difference in wins plus the difference in losses divided by two.
  5. ^ The White Stockings completed the season despite The Great Chicago Fire destroying Union Base-Ball Grounds and all the club's possessions. They were unable to field a team for the next two seasons.
  6. ^ The White Stockings moved to 23rd Street Grounds after Union Base-Ball Grounds was destroyed in The Great Chicago Fire in 1871. They played here from 1874 to 1877.
  7. ^ The White Stockings moved to Lakefront Park, formerly the location of Union Base-Ball Grounds that was destroyed in the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, and played there until 1885.
  8. ^ The White Stockings moved from Lakefront Park to West Side Park where they played until 1891. Securing new property after 1884 took longer than anticipated and they spent the first several weeks of the 1885 season on the road until the park was opened on June 6.
  9. ^ The dispute in 1885 concerned Game 2, which was forfeited by St. Louis when they pulled their team off the field protesting an umpiring decision. The managers, Cap Anson and Charles Comiskey, initially agreed to disregard the game. When St. Louis won the final game and an apparent 3–2 Series championship, Chicago White Stockings owner Albert Spalding overruled his manager and declared that he wanted the forfeit counted. The result of a tied Series was that neither team got the prize money that had been posted by the owners before the Series (and was returned to them after they both agreed it was a tie).[1]
  10. ^ The Chicago Colts moved during the 1891 season to South Side Park splitting their schedule between West Side Park and South Side Park. They played at South Side Park from 1891 to 1893.
  11. ^ The Chicago Colts moved to West Side Park, a few blocks west-southwest of the first West Side Park, from South Side Park, splitting their 1893 schedule with South Side Park. They would later move in 1916 to Weeghman Park, now Wrigley Field.
  12. ^ The Chicago Cubs moved from an aging West Side Park to Weeghman Park, now Wrigley Field. Weeghman Park was built in 1914 to host the, now defunct, Federal League's Chicago Whales. Once the Federal League collapsed at the end of the 1915 season, the Chicago Whales owner, Charles Weeghman, became part owner of the Chicago Cubs and moved the team to Weeghman Park.
  13. ^ In 1962 the National League increased the schedule from 154 games, which had been established since 1904, to 162 games, where it remains today.
  14. ^ In 1969 MLB expanded by 4 teams to 12 in each league and split each league into an East and West division, the Cubs were placed in the National League East.
  15. ^ The 1972 Major League Baseball strike forced the cancellation of the first seven games (thirteen game-days) of the season.[5]
  16. ^ The 1981 season was shortened by a player's strike. MLB decided to split the season into two halves with the division winner of each half playing in a Divisional Round of the playoffs.
  17. ^ Lights were installed in 1988 with the first night game on August 8 against Philadelphia, but was rained out after 3.5 innings.
  18. ^ In 1994 MLB split each league into 3 divisions. The Cubs were placed in the newly created National League Central.
  19. ^ There was no postseason in 1994 due to the 1994 Major League Baseball strike.
  20. ^ The Cubs played 163 games to resolve a regular season record tie with the San Francisco Giants for the wild card playoff spot and forced a one-game playoff tiebreaker, which the Cubs won 5-3.
  21. ^ Includes regular season games since 1876.
  22. ^ IThis does not include pre-modern World Series games (National League vs. American Association).


References

General

Specific

  1. ^ Jon David Cash, Before They Were Cardinals: Major League Baseball in Nineteenth-Century St. Louis. University of Missouri Press 2002
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Most Valuable Player winners". Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 4, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Rookie of the Year winners". Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 4, 2009. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Cy Young Award winners". Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 4, 2009. 
  5. ^ Morgan, Joe (August 21, 2002). "Strike is no longer necessary". ESPN. Retrieved 2009-03-05. 
  6. ^ a b c "Manager of the Year winners". Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 4, 2009.