List of Chicago Wolves award winners

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Chicago Wolves awards
Image alt text.
Some of the Wolves' banners hanging in the Allstate Arena
Award Wins
Turner Cup
2
Calder Cup
2
Fred A. Huber Trophy
1
Robert W. Clarke Trophy
3
John D. Chick Trophy
3
Norman R. "Bud" Poile Trophy
3
President's Award
1
Norman R. "Bud" Poile Trophy (IHL)
2
Leo P. Lamoureux Memorial Trophy
3
John Cullen Award
1
Ironman Award
1
IHL Man of the Year
3
Les Cunningham Award
2
John B. Sollenberger Trophy
3
Willie Marshall Award
2
Dudley "Red" Garrett Memorial Award
1
Yanick Dupre Memorial Award
1
Jack A. Butterfield Trophy
2
Total
Awards won 35

The Chicago Wolves are a professional ice hockey team playing in the American Hockey League (AHL). They are members of the Midwest division in the Western Conference.[1] They were founded in 1994 as an expansion team in the International Hockey League (IHL).[2] The Wolves joined the AHL in 2001 following the absorption of the IHL by the AHL.[3]

The Wolves have won numerous awards in both leagues. The Wolves are four-time league champions having won two titles in both the AHL and the IHL. They were awarded the Fred A. Huber Trophy in the 1999–2000 season for having the best record in the IHL and have also received multiple trophies for winning their division. Individually, they have had four players lead their league in scoring a total of six times, with Steve Maltais accomplishing the feat in both leagues. Maltais is the most decorated individual in franchise history, winning three individual trophies along with being named a First Team All-Star three times and a Second Team All-Star three times.

Two players have had their numbers retired by the franchise. Wendell Young's number 1 was retired in 2001; five years later Maltais' number 11 was removed from circulation. The Wolves have also honored four other individuals with permanent banners hanging in the Allstate Arena. These are former players Tim Breslin and Dan Snyder, both of whom are deceased, as well as former head coach John Anderson and former general manager Kevin Cheveldayoff. Breslin and Snyder were further honored with the creation of team awards. The Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award is awarded to the player "who best typifies Breslin's on-ice spirit and team-first attitude". The Dan Snyder Man of the Year Award is handed out to the Wolves' player who "demonstrates the most outstanding dedication to Chicago-area community service".

League awards[edit]

Team trophies and awards[edit]

A large silver trophy made of individual bands that become progressively smaller as they approach the top, where a bowl is affixed.
The Turner Cup, which the Wolves won on two occasions

The Wolves have won two championships in both the AHL and the IHL, first winning the Turner Cup as IHL champions during the 1997–98 and 1999–2000 seasons, then winning the Calder Cup in the 2001–02 and 2007–08 seasons.[4][5] The 2001–02 championship coincided with the Wolves' inaugural AHL season. They were the sixth AHL team to win the championship in their first season.[5]

Chicago received the 2009–10 President's Award, which recognizes an AHL organization for "excellence in all areas off the ice". Upon bestowing the award to the Wolves, the AHL called them a "forerunner in unique promotion and game-night experience" as well as "one of the league's model organizations in terms of community relations."[6]

Award Description Season Ref
Turner Cup IHL Champion 1997–98 [4]
1999–2000 [4]
Calder Cup AHL Champion 2001–02 [7]
2007–08 [7]
Fred A. Huber Trophy Best record in the IHL for the regular season 1999–2000 [8]
Robert W. Clarke Trophy AHL playoff champion of the Western Conferencea 2001–02 [9]
2004–05 [9]
2007–08 [9]
John D. Chick Trophy AHL West Division championb 2004–05 [10]
2007–08 [10]
2009–10 [10]
Norman R. "Bud" Poile Trophy AHL Mid-West Division Championsc 2007–08 [11]
2011–12 [11]
2013–14 [12]
President's Award Recognizes an AHL organization for excellence in all areas off the ice 2009–10 [13]

^ a: Prior to 1998, the Robert W. Clarke Trophy was awarded to the champion of the Southern Conference/Division.
^ b: The John D. Chick Trophy was originally awarded to the Southern Division winner from 1974–95, and it has since been awarded to the winner of the Central (1996, 2002–03), Empire (1997–2000), Southern (2001) and West (2004–12) Divisions. Starting in 2012–13, the Chick Trophy goes to the regular-season champions of the South Division.
^ c: The Norman R. "Bud" Poile Trophy was previously awarded to winner of the West Division (2002–03), and regular season Western Conference champions (2004–11).

Individual awards[edit]

International Hockey League[edit]

While members of the IHL, the Wolves had two scoring champions on their team. Both Rob Brown and Steve Maltais led the league in points with Brown accomplishing the feat in 1995–96 and 1996–97; Maltais led the league in the 1999–2000 season.[14] In the nine years the IHL Man of the Year was awarded, three Wolves players received the honors.[15]

A Caucasian man smiling is shown from the waist up. He wears a black jersey with an anamorphic penguin playing ice hockey for the logo
Rob Brown won multiple individual honors during the Wolves' time in the IHL
Award Description Name Season Ref
Norman R. "Bud" Poile Trophy (IHL) Most Valuable Player in the Turner Cup playoffs Semak, AlexanderAlexander Semak 1997–98 [16]
Trefilov, AndreiAndrei Trefilov 1999–2000 [16]
Leo P. Lamoureux Memorial Trophy League leader in points scored Brown, RobRob Brown 1995–96
1996–97
[14]
Maltais, SteveSteve Maltais 1999–2000 [14]
John Cullen Award Player deemed a key contributor to his team, while overcoming injury, illness, or other personal setbacks. Larouche, SteveSteve Larouche 1999–2000 [17]
Ironman Award Player who played in all of his team's games and displayed outstanding offensive and defensive skills. Maltais, SteveSteve Maltais 1999–2000 [18]
IHL Man of the Year Player who has distinguished himself through donation of time and other resources to charitable and educational efforts within his community. Breslin, TimTim Breslin 1996–97 [15]
Marinucci, ChrisChris Marinucci 1998–99 [15]
Young, WendellWendell Young 2000–01 [15]
IHL First All-Star Team Top performers at each position over the course of the season Maltais, SteveSteve Maltais (LW) 1994–95
1998–99
1999–2000
[19]
Brown, RobRob Brown (RW) 1995–96
1996–97
[20]
Andersson, NiklasNiklas Andersson (RW) 2000–01 [21]
Larouche, SteveSteve Larouche (LW) 2000–01 [22]
IHL Second All-Star Team Top performers at each position over the course of the season Maltais, SteveSteve Maltais (LW) 1995–96
1996–97
[19]
Marinucci, ChrisChris Marinucci (RW) 1998–99 [23]
Tilley, TomTom Tilley (D) 1998–99 [24]
Andersson, NiklasNiklas Andersson (RW) 1999–2000 [21]
Larouche, SteveSteve Larouche (LW) 1999–2000 [22]
Eakins, DallasDallas Eakins (D) 1999–2000 [25]
Nardella, BobBob Nardella (D) 1999–2000 [22]

International Hockey League All-Star Game selections[edit]

The IHL first started holding All-Star games in 1962. Initially the game format had the defending champion playing against a collection of All-Stars from the teams in the league.[26] The game changed to an East vs. West in 1967, but returned to the original format in 2000.[27][28] The Wolves hosted the game as defending champions in 2001. They entered the game as the last place team in the Western Conference.[27] Despite their record Chicago won the game 4–0. It was the only shutout in IHL All-Star game history.[29][30] During the contest Steve Maltais recorded a goal and an assist, the two-point performance made him the IHL's all-time leading scorer in All-Star competition with 12 points in 7 games.[31]

Season Player(s) Ref
1994–95 Steve Maltais [30]
1995–96 Steve Maltais [30]
1996–97 Rob Brown, Steve Maltais, Troy Murray [30]
1997–98 Kevin Dahl, Ravil Gusmanov, Steve Maltais, Wendell Young [30]
1998–99 Niklas Andersson, Steve Maltais, Chris Marinucci, Tom Tilley, Pat Jablonskie [30]
1999–2000 Steve Maltais [30]
2000–01 Team representation [27]

American Hockey League[edit]

In the 2006–07 season the Wolves had two players winning four individual trophies, three players garnering end of the year All-Star team honors, and two making the All-rookie team.[32] The output was fueled by the Wolves' high scoring top line of Darren Haydar, Jason Krog, and Brett Sterling.[33] Each player finished in the top 10 in AHL scoring with Haydar leading the league in points. Haydar also received the Les Cunningham Award as the league's Most Valuable Player (MVP). Sterling led the league in goal scoring and earned rookie of the year honors.[34][35] In 2007–08 Krog led the league in goals, assists, and points, becoming only the third player in league history to accomplish the feat. His performance also earned him the MVP bringing his individual trophy total to three. He added a fourth after the Wolves won the Calder Cup and he was named playoff MVP.[5]

A Caucasian ice hockey player standing on the ice looking down. He wears a white helmet, white jersey with maroon shoulder and arm stripes, black shorts, and white socks. The jersey has a stylized wolf head with a stick and puck behind it as the logo.
Darren Haydar has won multiple individual awards during the Wolves' time in the AHL
Jake Allen was an AHL First Team All-Star and won the Aldege "Baz" Bastien Memorial Award in 2013–14
Award Description Player Season Ref
Les Cunningham Award Most Valuable Player Haydar, DarrenDarren Haydar 2006–07 [10]
Krog, JasonJason Krog 2007–08 [10]
John B. Sollenberger Trophy League leader in points Maltais, SteveSteve Maltais 2002–03 [36]
Haydar, DarrenDarren Haydar 2006–07 [36]
Krog, JasonJason Krog 2007–08 [36]
Willie Marshall Award League leader in goals scored Sterling, BrettBrett Sterling 2006–07 [13]
Krog, JasonJason Krog 2007–08 [13]
Aldege "Baz" Bastien Memorial Award League's best goaltender Allen, JakeJake Allen 2013–14 [37]
Dudley "Red" Garrett Memorial Award Rookie of the year Sterling, BrettBrett Sterling 2006–07 [38]
Yanick Dupre Memorial Award Man of the year for service to his local community Foster, KurtisKurtis Foster 2003–04 [13]
Jack A. Butterfield Trophy Most Valuable Player of the playoffs Nurminen, PasiPasi Nurminen 2001–02 [39]
Krog, JasonJason Krog 2007–08 [39]
AHL All-rookie Team Top rookies at each position Oystrick, NathanNathan Oystrick (D) 2006–07 [40]
Sterling, BrettBrett Sterling (LW) 2006–07 [40]
AHL First All-Star Team Top performers at each position over the course of the season Roche, TravisTravis Roche (D) 2004–05 [40]
Sterling, BrettBrett Sterling (LW) 2006–07 [40]
Haydar, DarrenDarren Haydar (RW) 2006–07 [40]
Krog, JasonJason Krog (C) 2007–08 [40]
Allen, JakeJake Allen (G) 2013–14 [41]
AHL Second All-Star Team Top performers at each position over the course of the season Maltais, SteveSteve Maltais (LW) 2003–04 [40]
Lehtonen, KariKari Lehtonen (G) 2004–05 [40]
Vigier, J.P.J.P. Vigier (RW) 2004–05 [40]
Oystrick, NathanNathan Oystrick (D) 2006–07 [40]
Kwiatkowski, JoelJoel Kwiatkowski (D) 2007–08 [40]
Sterling, BrettBrett Sterling (LW) 2007–08 [40]
Dawes, NigelNigel Dawesd (LW) 2010–11 [40]
Haydar, DarrenDarren Haydar (RW) 2010–11 [40]

^ d: Dawes split time between Chicago and the Hamilton Bulldogs during the season.

American Hockey League All-Star Game selections[edit]

A Caucasian ice hockey player, shown from the waist up, has his back turned to the camera looking over his left shoulder. He wears a white jersey with his name in maroon lettering and the number 6 on his back and sleeve in yellow.
Kevin Connauton represented the Wolves at the 2012 All-Star Classic.

The AHL All-Star Classic is an exhibition game held yearly by the league since it was reintroduced in the 1994–95 season.[42] Since the Wolves joined the league in 2001, twelve games have been played. During that time 22 Wolves' players have been selected to play in All-Star competition with Brett Sterling being the most frequent with 4 selections.[43][44]

Season Player(s) Ref
2001–02 J.P. Vigier [44]
2002–03 Garnet Exelby,e Kurtis Foster [30]
2003–04 Kari Lehtonene [30]
2004–05 Kari Lehtonen,f Travis Roche [45]
2005–06 Braydon Coburn [45]
2006–07 Darren Haydar,f Jason Krog,g Nathan Oystrick, Brett Sterlingf [45]
2007–08 Jason Krog, Joel Kwiatkowski, Brett Sterlingf [45]
2008–09 Joe Motzko [45]
2009–10 Brett Sterling [45]
2010–11 Spencer Machacek, Paul Postmaf [45]
2011–12 Kevin Connauton, Darren Haydarfh [45]
2012–13 Brad Hunt, Brett Sterlinge [46]
2013–14 Jake Allen [47]

^ e: Player was selected for the game, but did not play due to injury.
^ f: Player was a starter for the All-Star Game.
^ g: Player was selected for the game, but did not play due to a National Hockey League call-up.
^ h: Player was named team captain for the game.

Career achievements[edit]

The Chicago Wolves have retired two numbers in their history.[48][49] Wendell Young was the first to receive the honor. Young played seven seasons for the Wolves and was a member of their two Turner Cup championship teams.[49][50] He retired as the franchise leader in goaltender games played (322), wins (169), saves (8,467) and minutes played (17,912).[49] The second retired number belonged to longtime forward Steve Maltais. Maltais was the only player to be part of the Wolves for their first 11 season. His longevity and production led to him being the Wolves all-time leader in goals (454); assists (496); points (950); penalty minutes (1,061) and games played (839).[48]

The Wolves have also honored four individuals with permanent banners hanging in the Allstate Arena, two former players, a former head coach, and a former general manager.[51][52][53][54] The two players, Tim Breslin and Dan Snyder, are both deceased. Snyder died during his playing career and Breslin shortly after his. While neither player recorded big statistical numbers, each was highly involved in the community and with charities during their time with the Wolves.[55][56][57][58] They also honored John Anderson and Kevin Cheveldayoff for their contributions to the franchise. Anderson was head coach of the Wolves for all four of their championship teams.[53] Likewise Cheveldayoff was general manager for the four championships and 12 years in total.[54]

In 2013 defenseman Chris Chelios was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame, becoming the first person affiliated with the organization to be so honored. Chelios joined the Wolves during the 2009–10 season at the age of 47 in hopes of earning a contract with a National Hockey League (NHL) team.[59][60] He eventually signed with the Atlanta Thrashers and retired after the season.[61][62]

six banners hanging from the ceiling. They vary in size and shape each has yellow lettering with maroon trim describing what they represent.
The Wolves' honoree banners hanging in the Allstate Arena

Retired numbers[edit]

Player Number Year Years with the Wolves Ref
Wendell Young 1 2001 1994–2001 [49]
Steve Maltais 11 2006 1994–2005 [48]

Personnel honored with banners[edit]

Player Year Years with the Wolves Ref
Dan Snyder 2004 2001–03 [51]
Tim Breslin 2005 1994–99 [52]
John Anderson 2010 1997–2008 [53]
Kevin Cheveldayoff 2013 1997–2009 [54]

Hockey Hall of Fame[edit]

Player Year Years with the Wolves Ref
Chris Chelios 2013 2009–10 [63]

Team awards[edit]

Dan Snyder Man of the Year Award[edit]

 A Caucasian ice hockey player bent over at the waist. He wears a white helmet and has a large beard.
Brett Sterling was the Dan Snyder Man of the Year Award winner in 2010.

The Dan Snyder Man of the Year Award was created to honor former Wolves player Dan Snyder following his death from injuries resulting from a car accident. The award annually is given to the "Wolves' player who demonstrates the most outstanding dedication to Chicago-area community service each year."[55]

Snyder played parts of two seasons with the Wolves, appearing in 91 games and registering 58 points.[57] During the 2001–02 season he helped Chicago win their first Calder Cup.[55] In his short time with the team, Snyder participated in numerous charitable events and "set an example to be followed by future members of the team."[55] Snyder was critically injured after the Ferrari 360 Modena, being driven by his friend and teammate Dany Heatley, crashed. Snyder required surgery to repair a depressed skull fracture and was comatose.[64][65] Six days after the accident on October 5, 2003 he lapsed into septic shock and died, never regaining consciousness.[66]

Season Player Position Ref
2003–04 Foster, KurtisKurtis Foster Defense [67]
2004–05 Stewart, KarlKarl Stewart Left wing [68]
2005–06 Stewart, KarlKarl Stewart Left wing [69]
2006–07 Sipotz, BrianBrian Sipotz Defense [70]
2007–08 Oystrick, NathanNathan Oystrick Defense [71]
2008–09 LaVallee, JordanJordan LaVallee Left wing [72]
2009–10 Sterling, BrettBrett Sterling Left wing [73]
2010–11 Machacek, SpencerSpencer Machacek Right wing [74]
2011–12 Haydar, DarrenDarren Haydar Right wing [75]
2012–13 Davies, MichaelMichael Davies Forward [76]
2013–14 Davies, MichaelMichael Davies Forward [77]

Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award[edit]

A Caucasian ice hockey player shown from the waist up. He wears a white helmet with a visor and a white jersey with maroon shoulders and sleeves. The number 25 is on his sleeve in yellow below a patch with the Wolves' logo.
Mark Matheson was the 2012 winner of the Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award.

The Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award was created to honor former player Tim Breslin following his 2005 death due to complications from appendiceal cancer. The Award is handed out annually to a player who "best typifies Breslin's on-ice spirit and team-first attitude."[56] Players are nominated by the Wolves hockey operations department, with an internet fan poll determining the winner.[78][79]

Breslin was one of the first three players signed by the Wolves following their founding as an IHL expansion team.[2][56] He played five seasons with the Wolves, scoring 37 goals, 119 points in 330 games and was a member of Chicago's 1998 Turner Cup championship team.[56][80] While with the Wolves Breslin was highly involved in charitable work in the local community, both through the franchise and on his own.[81] Former GM Cheveldayoff said of Breslin "You could always count on Tim to come and compete every night and do what was needed for the team to win".[82]

Season Player Position Ref
2004–05 Wedderburn, TimTim Wedderburn Defense [83]
2005–06 Doell, KevinKevin Doell Center [84]
2006–07 Fahey, BrianBrian Fahey Defense [85]
2007–08 Sipotz, BrianBrian Sipotz Defense [83]
2008–09 Martins, SteveSteve Martins Center [86]
2009–10 Anderson, MattMatt Anderson Forward [79]
2010–11 Sifers, JaimeJaime Sifers Defense [87]
2011–12 Matheson, MarkMark Matheson Defense [88]
2012–13 Sweatt, BillBill Sweatt Left wing [89]
2013–14 Regner, BrentBrent Regner Defense [90]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chaimovitch 2012, p. 9
  2. ^ a b Smith, William (1995-10-06). "Upstart Wolves Skate a Fine Line as Second Season Starts". Chicago Sun-Times  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2012-07-27. 
  3. ^ Spellman, Mike (2001-10-12). "AHL president: Merger 'good for all of us'.(Sports Weekend)". Daily Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ a b c "Joseph Turner Memorial Cup". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  5. ^ a b c "Top Wolves Moments Of The Decade #5–1". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  6. ^ "Wolves Honored With Five League Awards". Chicago Wolves. 2010-07-08. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  7. ^ a b Chaimovitch 2012, p. 9 – Chicago Wolves section
  8. ^ Spellman, Mike (2000-04-21). "Despite Wolves' dominance, Houston has a shot at the Cup.(SportsWeekend)". Daily Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  9. ^ a b c Chaimovitch 2012, p. 18
  10. ^ a b c d e Chaimovitch 2012, p. 21
  11. ^ a b Chaimovitch 2012, p. 19
  12. ^ "Trophy Case:Norman R. "Bud" Poile Trophy". American Hockey League. Retrieved 2014-05-17. 
  13. ^ a b c d Chaimovitch 2012, p. 25
  14. ^ a b c "Leo Lamoureux Memorial Trophy winners". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  15. ^ a b c d "IHL Man of the Year winners". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  16. ^ a b "N.R. "Bud" Poile Trophy winners". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  17. ^ "John Cullen Award winners". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  18. ^ "Ironman Award winners". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  19. ^ a b "Steve G. Maltais player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  20. ^ "Rob Brown player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  21. ^ a b "Niklas P. Andersson player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  22. ^ a b c Skelnik 2012, p. 192
  23. ^ "Chris Marinucci player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  24. ^ "Tom R. Tilley player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  25. ^ "Dallas F. Eakins player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  26. ^ "Turner Cup champs defeat IHL All-Stars, Grizzlies". Deseret News. 2000-01-18. Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  27. ^ a b c Duncan, Sean (2001-01-15). "Wolves Not In Best Shape To Face Ihl Stars". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  28. ^ Spellman, Mike (2001-01-12). "Wolves prepare for IHL all-stars.(SportsWeekend)". Daily Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2012-07-27. 
  29. ^ "Wolves beat IHL stars". Deseret News. 2000-01-16. Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i Skelnik 2012, p. 191
  31. ^ Barry, Sal J. (2001-01-16). "An All-Star performance". Columbia Chronicle. Retrieved 2013-01-18. 
  32. ^ Chaimovitch 2012, pp. 21–34
  33. ^ "Penguins ready for Wolves". The Times Leader. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  34. ^ "AHL 2006-07 League Leaders". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  35. ^ Chaimovitch 2012, pp. 21–23
  36. ^ a b c Chaimovitch 2012, p. 23
  37. ^ "Allen Named AHL's Outstanding Goaltender". St. Louis Blues. 2014-04-17. Retrieved 2014-08-30. 
  38. ^ Chaimovitch 2012, p. 22
  39. ^ a b Chaimovitch 2012, p. 26
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Chaimovitch 2012, p. 34
  41. ^ "2013-14 AHL All-Star Team". Observer-Dispatch. 2014-04-10. Retrieved 2014-04-10. 
  42. ^ "Stars coming to Providence in 2013". American Hockey League. 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  43. ^ Foltman, Bob (2001-05-11). "Wolves slated to join AHL: Expanded league reportedly taking 5 other IHL clubs". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  44. ^ a b Chaimovitch 2012, p. 215
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h Chaimovitch 2012, p. 214
  46. ^ "Brad Hunt Replaces Brett Sterling on AHL All-Star Team". Chicago Wolves. 2013-01-23. Retrieved 2013-01-23. 
  47. ^ Dougherty, Pete (2014-01-09). "Pirri selected as AHL all-star; Devils snubbed". Times Union. Retrieved 2014-01-11. 
  48. ^ a b c "Wolves to retire Maltais' No. 11.(Sports)". Daily Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). 2006-01-27. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  49. ^ a b c d Spellman, Mike (2001-11-30). "Ring master Wolves will honor former goalie Young by retiring his No. 1.(Sports)". Daily Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  50. ^ "Wendell Young career statistics". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  51. ^ a b Goddard, Joe (2004-03-26). "Saturday is Snyder day for Wolves". Chicago Sun-Times  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  52. ^ a b "Knights' big finish buries Wolves". Chicago Sun-Times  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). 2005-12-04. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  53. ^ a b c "Sports in 60 seconds.(Sports)". Daily Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). 2010-02-16. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  54. ^ a b c Miles, Bruce (2013-02-16). "Wolves honor former GM Cheveldayoff". Daily Herald. Retrieved 2013-02-21. 
  55. ^ a b c d "Dan Snyder Man of the Year Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  56. ^ a b c d "Tim Breslin Scholarship and Awards". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  57. ^ a b "Dan Snyder career statistics". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  58. ^ "Tim Breslin career statistics". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  59. ^ "Chelios signs with AHL's Chicago Wolves". The Globe and Mail. 2009-10-20. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  60. ^ "Chicago Blackhawks legend Chris Chelios signs with Chicago Wolves". ESPN. 2009-10-20. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  61. ^ "Chelios, 48, signs with Thrashers". ESPN. 2010-03-02. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  62. ^ "Chelios retires after 26 NHL seasons". Detroit Red Wings. 2010-08-31. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  63. ^ Brough, Jason (2013-07-09). "Chelios, Niedermayer, and Shanahan headline 2013 Hall of Fame inductees". NBC Sports. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  64. ^ "A Sadness In Atlanta". Sports Illustrated. 2003-10-13. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  65. ^ "Snyder in critical condition; Heatley injured in car crash". CBC. 2003-10-01. Retrieved 2010-09-07. 
  66. ^ "Thrashers' Snyder Dies". The New York Times. 2003-10-06. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  67. ^ "Dan Snyder remembered in Chicago". American Hockey League. 2004-03-27. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  68. ^ "Stewart Earns Wolves' 2004-05 Dan Snyder Man of the Year Award". Chicago Wolves. 2005-04-14. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  69. ^ "Stewart Earns 05-06 Dan Snyder Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  70. ^ Marshall, Bruce (2008-06-15). "Sipotz looms large on and off the ice". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  71. ^ "Oystrick Named Wolves' 2007-08 Dan Snyder Man Of The Year". Chicago Wolves. 2008-04-10. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  72. ^ "LaVallee Named Wolves' Dan Snyder Man of the Year". Chicago Wolves. 2009-03-26. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  73. ^ "Sterling Named Wolves' 2009-10 Dan Snyder Man Of The Year". Chicago Wolves. 2009-03-26. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  74. ^ "Machacek Named Wolves 2010-11 Dan Snyder Man of the Year". Chicago Wolves. 2011-04-06. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  75. ^ "Wolves peaking just in time for AHL playoffs". Daily Herald. 2012-04-13. Retrieved 2013-01-02. 
  76. ^ "Wolves honor Davies, Sterling with awards". Daily Herald. 2013-04-12. Retrieved 2013-04-18. 
  77. ^ "Davies repeats as winner of Dan Snyder Award". Chicago Wolves. 2013-04-18. Retrieved 2014-05-17. 
  78. ^ "Fahey earns award". Glenview Announcements  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). 2007-04-19. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  79. ^ a b "Wolves to Present Anderson with Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  80. ^ "Tim Breslin Career Statistics". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  81. ^ Mandernach, Mark (1997-12-21). "Ice Guy: The Chicago Wolves' Tim Breslin Gets High Marks For Serving The Community". Chicago Tribune. p. 1. Retrieved 2012-12-27. 
  82. ^ Thomas, Monifa (2005-02-17). "Tim Breslin, 37, Chicago Wolves hockey player". Chicago Sun-Times  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 2012-12-27. 
  83. ^ a b "Wolves To Present Sipotz With Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. 2008-04-02. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  84. ^ "Wolves to Present Doell with Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. 2012-04-06. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  85. ^ "Wolves to Present Fahey with Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  86. ^ "Wolves To Present Martins With Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. 2008-03-27. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  87. ^ "Wolves To Present Sifers With Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  88. ^ "Wolves Defenseman Mark Matheson Named Breslin Unsung Hero Award Winner". Chicago Wolves. 2012-03-22. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  89. ^ "Sweatt Wins Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2013-04-18. 
  90. ^ "Regner wins Tim Breslin Unsung Hero Award". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved 2014-05-17.