List of Chinese Americans

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This is a list of notable Chinese Americans, including both original immigrants who obtained American citizenship and their American descendants.

To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Chinese American or must have references showing they are Chinese American and are notable.

List[edit]

Arts[edit]

Business[edit]

Civil Rights[edit]

  • Wong Chin Foo (王清福) - 19th century civil rights activist and journalist
  • Wong Kim Ark (黃金德) - his lawsuit established the principle of citizenship by virtue of birth on US soil.
  • Harry Wu (吴弘达) - human rights activist, focuses on Laogai prison camps and human rights in China
  • Sherman Wu - civil rights activist, famous racial discrimination incident by university fraternity
  • Helen Zia (謝漢蘭) - community activist and writer

Entertainment[edit]

Fashion[edit]

Journalism[edit]

Law and judiciary[edit]

Literature[edit]

Military[edit]

Music[edit]

Politics and government[edit]

Science, engineering, medicine and academia[edit]

Sports[edit]

Other[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Fred Chang."
  2. ^ "James Chu."
  3. ^ "John Chuang."
  4. ^ "Ted Fu." http://taiwaneseamerican.org/census2010/photo.php
  5. ^ http://www.nancy-kwan.com
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Streetside Chat with Author Ed Lin, TaiwaneseAmerican.org, http://taiwaneseamerican.org/ta/2012/05/24/streetside-chat-with-author-ed-lin/
  8. ^ Tewari, Nita; Alvarez, Alvin (2008-09-26). Asian American psychology: current perspectives. CRC Press. pp. 117–. ISBN 978-0-8058-6008-5. Retrieved 6 March 2011. 
  9. ^ Jeffrey Lofton; Jamie Stevenson (18 May 2010). "Veterans History Project Explores Integration of the U.S. Armed Forces Through the Service of Asian-Pacific American Veterans". News from the Library of Congress. Library of Congress. Retrieved 14 February 2011. 
  10. ^ Cpl Christopher Duncan (30 January 2009). "Heroes visit the National Museum of the Marine Corps". Quantico Sentry. Retrieved 14 February 2011. 
  11. ^ "Jack Hsu."
  12. ^ "Kelis, born to a Puerto Rican and Chinese mother and African-American father, began her singing aspirations as a child with the Girl's Choir of Harlem."
  13. ^ http://averygoodlife.blogspot.com.au/2010/12/3-favorite-quotes-of-ling-ling-chang.html
  14. ^ http://chinatowncenter.com/2011/carol-chen/
  15. ^ http://www.asianweek.com/2012/03/02/taiwanese-nj-mayor-lin-symbolic-of-asian-americans-struggle/
  16. ^ http://www.marysuforwalnut.com/default.asp?sub=BIOGRAPHY
  17. ^ Matt Hennie (December 2, 2009). "Bell, Wan wink at history in scoring LGBT wins". Project Q Atlanta. 
  18. ^ http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/show_story.php?id=23833
  19. ^ MacArthur Foundation website
  20. ^ http://www.laskerfoundation.org/awards/1991_c_description.htm
  21. ^ "Faculty Biography: Ming C. Lin". People. Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved February 3, 2010. 
  22. ^ Faculty Honors: Ming C. Lin, Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, retrieved 2011-02-04.
  23. ^ The Shaw Prize 2009
  24. ^ Wright, Pearce (11 December 2001). "Joe Hin Tjio". The Guardian (London). 
  25. ^ http://www.jbc.org/content/282/22/e17.full
  26. ^ Zagorski, N. (2006). "Profile of Xiaodong Wang". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 103 (1): 7–9. doi:10.1073/pnas.0509187103. PMC 1324996. PMID 16380419.  edit
  27. ^ "The Shaw Prize". The Shaw Prize. 2006-06-21. Retrieved 2007-08-01. 
  28. ^ http://www.nature.com/drugdisc/nj/articles/nrd1811.html
  29. ^ http://communications.medicine.iu.edu/newsroom/stories/2011/scientist-who-developed-prozac-receives-international-honor/
  30. ^ http://www.spu.edu/depts/uc/response/winter98/features/prozac.html
  31. ^ "Alphabet Energy. Thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery". Alphabetenergy.com. Retrieved 2011-07-30. 
  32. ^ "Person Of The Year 2007". Time. 19 December 2007. 
  33. ^ "Washingtonpost.com: Chinese Americans Bask in Kwan's Spotlight". The Washington Post. 28 February 1999. 

See also[edit]