List of Christian religious houses in Schleswig-Holstein

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Cismar Abbey

This is a list of Christian religious houses in Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, including Hamburg and Lübeck,[1] extant and non-extant, and including houses of both men and women. All religious houses were suppressed during the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century, with the exception of four former nunneries (Itzehoe, Preetz, Uetersen and St. John's, Schleswig), which became Protestant collegiate foundations for noblewomen, and still survive today.

Religious house Location Dedication Order Notes
Ahrensbök Charterhouse Ahrensbök Blessed Virgin Mary Carthusians 1397-1542
Béguinages Hamburg, Lübeck,[2] Neumünster, Neustadt and Plön Beguines various
Bordesholm Priory Bordesholm Blessed Virgin Mary Augustinian Canons c.1326/30-1566; moved here from Neumünster
Cismar Abbey near Grömitz Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint John the Evangelist Benedictine monks 1231-1561; transferred from St. John's Abbey, Lübeck
Flensburg Friary Flensburg Saint Catherine Franciscan friars 1232/33 or 1263-1528
Guldholm Abbey Glücksburg Benedictine monks 1191/92-1209/10; transferred from St Michael's Abbey, Schleswig; transferred to Rüde Abbey
St. Mary Magdalene's Priory, Hamburg Hamburg Saint Mary Magdalene Franciscan friars 1236/39-1529
St. John's Priory, Hamburg Hamburg Saint John Dominican friars c.1236-1529
Harvestehude Priory Harvestehude Blessed Virgin Mary Cistercian nuns until the Reformation; afterwards, Lutheran women's collegiate foundation (Damenstift) c.1250-1529 (Cistercian nuns); 1529-nk [after 1837] (Damenstift)
Hemmingstedt Priory Hemmingstedt Blessed Virgin Mary Benedictine nuns; Franciscan friars 1503-17 (Benedictine nuns); 1517-18 (Franciscan friars)
Franciscan Friary, Husum[3] Husum Franciscan friars c.1494-after 1527
Dominican Priory, Husum Husum Dominican friars shortly before 1466-tbe
Itzehoe Abbey (extant) Itzehoe Blessed Virgin Mary ?order; survived Reformation as a Lutheran women's collegiate foundation (Damenstift) founded in Ivenfleth in 1230, moved to Itzehoe 1256; 1256-1538, nuns; 1541 to present, Damenstift
Kiel Friary Kiel Blessed Virgin Mary Franciscan friars c.1240-1530
Kuddewörde Friary Kuddewörde Wilhelmite friars 1495/97-c.1525
St. John's Abbey, Lübeck Lübeck Saint John the Evangelist Benedictine double monastery, later Benedictine nuns; Cistercian nuns; women's collegiate foundation 1177-1231: Benedictine double monastery, later Benedictine nuns; transferred to Cismar; 1246-1575: Cistercian nuns; 1575-1806: women's collegiate foundation[4]
St. Catherine's Priory, Lübeck Lübeck Saint Catherine Franciscan friars 1225-1531
St. Mary Magdalene's Priory, Lübeck (or Burgkloster[5]) Lübeck Saint Mary Magdalene Dominican friars 1227/29-1532
St. Anne's Priory, Lübeck Lübeck Saint Anne Augustinian canonesses 1502/05-1532
St. Michael's Priory, Lübeck Lübeck Saint Michael Sisters of the Common Life before 1451-1557
Lunden Friary Lunden Franciscan friars 1516-32
Marienwohlde Abbey near Mölln Bridgettine double monastery 1413-1558[6]
Meldorf Priory Meldorf Blessed Virgin Mary Dominican friars 1378-1540
Mohrkirchen Hospital Mohrkirch Saint Anthony Hospital Brothers of St. Anthony 1391-1544 at Mohrkirch[7]
Neumünster Priory Neumünster Blessed Virgin Mary Augustinian Canons c.1125/27-c.1330 (transferred to Bordesholm)
Priory of the Sisters of the Common Life, Neumünster Neumünster Sisters of the Common Life 1498-1570
Neustadt Priory Neustadt Saint Anne Sisters of the Common Life c.1245/50-1537
Nütschau Priory, or St. Ansgar's Priory (extant) Travenbrück Saint Ansgar Benedictine monks founded 1951 as a dependent house of Gerleve Abbey; independent priory from 1975
Plön Priory Plön Blessed Virgin Mary and the Ten Thousand Martyrs Sisters of the Common Life 1468-1578
Preetz Priory (extant) Preetz Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint John Benedictine nuns; Lutheran women's collegiate foundation (Damenstift) c.1210/12[8]-1542: Benedictine nuns; 1542 to the present: Damenstift
St. George's Abbey on the Hill, Ratzeburg (Kloster St. Georg auf dem Berge)[9] Ratzeburg Saint George Benedictine monks; became a hospital in the 13th century early 11th century-1066; c. 1145-Reformation
Abbey of St. Mary and St. John, Ratzeburg Ratzeburg Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint John the Evangelist Premonstratensian Canons; secular college 1154-1504: Premonstratensian Canons; 1504-1566: secular college
Reinbek Abbey Reinbek Saint Mary Magdalene Cistercian nuns 1226/29-1529
Reinfeld Abbey Reinfeld Blessed Virgin Mary Cistercian monks 1186/90-1582
Rüde Abbey Glücksburg Cistercian monks 1209/10-after 1557 (demolished 1582); transferred from Guldholm Abbey
St. John's Priory, Schleswig (extant) (Schleswig St. Johannis) Schleswig Saint John the Baptist; later also Saint John the Evangelist Benedictine nuns; Lutheran women's collegiate foundation (Damenstift) 1st half of the 13th century-1542: Benedictine nuns; 1542 to the present: Damenstift
St. Michael's Abbey, Schleswig (Schleswig St. Michaelis) Schleswig Saint Michael Benedictine monks before 1140-1192
St. Paul's Priory, Schleswig (Schleswig St. Paul, also known as the Graukloster or "Greyfriars") Schleswig Saint Paul Franciscan friars 1234-1528/29
St. Mary Magdalene's Priory, Schleswig (Schleswig St. Maria Magdalena) Schleswig Saint Mary Magdalene Dominican friars 1235-1528/29
Segeberg Abbey Bad Segeberg Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint John the Evangelist Augustinian Canons 1134 (re-settled in 1155)-1564/66
Uetersen Priory (extant) Uetersen Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Apostle, Saint Bartholomew and the Holy Cross Cistercian nuns; Lutheran women's collegiate foundation (Damenstift) 1234/35-1555: Cistercian nuns; 1555 to the present: Damenstift
St. John's Priory, Schleswig

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ but not including the famous Cistercian monastery, Lügum Abbey, now Løgum Abbey, which was situated at Lügumkloster in North Schleswig, and is thus in Denmark
  2. ^ there were six béguinages in Lübeck
  3. ^ Husum Castle was built on the site
  4. ^ now the Gymnasium Johanneum
  5. ^ "castle monastery", because of its location near the castle
  6. ^ the remaining assets were appropriated by the Duke of Saxe-Lauenberg in 1558, but the premises had already been destroyed in 1534
  7. ^ conventionally, the monastery is known as Mohrkirchen, but the town as Mohrkirch
  8. ^ the nunnery occupied several sites in the vicinity of Preetz before settling at the present location in 1261
  9. ^ St. George's was the predecessor of the bishopric of Ratzeburg

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]