List of Connecticut tornadoes

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Picture of a house destroyed by the Wallingford Tornado of 1878

Although historically the U.S. state of Connecticut is not typically known to fall casualty to tornadoes, more than 100 of these powerful storms have affected the state in modern history, resulting in at least 48 deaths, 780 injuries, and more than $500 million in damage.[1][2] This list of tornadoes in the state is likely incomplete, as official records date back only to 1950 for tornadoes in the United States.[1]

As with most of the northeastern United States, the number of tornadoes peaks in the summer months, normally in July or August. Hartford County has had the most tornadoes in the state, although since 1950 Litchfield County has reported the most tornadoes. Several areas have been struck more than once, and Waterbury has been struck by no less than four tornadoes since 1955.

From 1953 to 1991, Connecticut recorded an average of about 1.3 tornadoes per year, ranked 43rd in the United States.[3] Although Connecticut tornadoes are typically weak, isolated events can be violent. Three tornadoes of F4 intensity have affected the state in its history, as well as at least 27 tornadoes of F2 intensity or greater. Outbreaks of three or more tornadoes in a single day occurred in 1786, 1787, 1878, 1973, 1989, 1998, and 2001. The year 1973 was particularly active; eight tornadoes occurred on six separate days. The 1878 Wallingford tornado killed at least 29 and likely 34 people in Wallingford, the most by any tornado event in Connecticut history.

Before 1850[edit]

  • June 14, 1648: A "great tempest" downed trees somewhere in present-day Hartford County.[4]
  • June 20, 1682: A violent storm, including one or more likely tornadoes, devastated forests in southern Connecticut, affecting areas north of Fairfield across the Housatonic River before passing out into Long Island Sound between Milford and New Haven. The damage was worst around present-day Shelton, where a path was cut a half-mile wide where there was "scarce a tree left standing".[5][6]
  • August 17, 1784: Two tornadoes struck central Connecticut. The first tornado touched down near present-day Roxbury, then known as "Shipague-Neck". It travelled through the village of South Britain, injuring five people, with one man injured so that "his life was in great danger". Ten houses, five barns, and three mills were badly damaged or destroyed.[8] The second tornado injured one person while moving down a hillside west of Southington.[9]
  • August 23, 1786: As many as six tornadoes did a great deal of damage in Windham County. Twenty homes and sixty-three barns were destroyed, as well as 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of dense forest. One woman was killed and five people were injured in Woodstock. Leaves from destroyed trees rained down heavily in Providence, Rhode Island.[9][10]
  • August 15, 1787: The Four-State Tornado Swarm of 1787 was the largest tornado outbreak recorded to date, and affected most of New England. The first in the state touched down around 1:30 PM near New Britain, traveling along nearly the same path as a tornado in 1728 or 1729. This tornado was nearly as violent as the Wallingford Tornado of 1878. A mother and two of her children were killed in Wethersfield, and 10 others were injured before the tornado lifted outside of the town.[11] What may have been another tornado caused additional damage as far east as Coventry. Another tornado struck East Windsor, damaging several homes and barns. Yet another touched down near Killingly, moving northeast into Rhode Island and Massachusetts.[7][9]
  • June 19, 1794: A tornado destroyed several structures in Milford injuring four people, while a separate tornado cut through Branford. A strange incident was recorded where a tree was uprooted and carried, fully upright, along a road in New Milford, along with several other large objects. A barn door was found 10 miles (16 km) from its source. Some loss of life likely occurred from one or both tornadoes.[9][12]
  • June 30, 1808: One or more tornadoes moved from Windsor to Coventry, killing one person.[13]
  • July 22, 1808: Trees and buildings were damaged by a tornado which moved from East Windsor to North Bolton.[13]
  • July 16, 1810: A tornado produced damage in or around Somers.[13]
  • August 14, 1820: A tornado touched down east of Norwalk.[15]
  • July 31, 1839: Six homes were damaged or destroyed on the west side of New Haven.[16] A "heavy rumbling noise" was heard throughout the city.[17]
  • August 7, 1839: A possible tornado passed through a then-uninhabited area of Wallingford.[7]

1850–1949[edit]

  • September 15, 1876: A 300-yard (270 m) wide tornado unroofed several homes in northern Bridgeport.[21]
  • August 18, 1877: "Something like a tornado", described as a "whirling mass of black clouds" cut across Hartford, tearing down trees and branches.[22]
  • August 9, 1878: At least three tornadoes affected the state from a single storm system. The first touched down in South Kent, causing major damage but no injuries. The second, the Wallingford Tornado of 1878, touched down just outside of Wallingford. A severe tornado, likely an F4, it smashed through the north side of town, completely destroying dozens of houses. At least 29 people were killed in that town (likely 34), the most by any tornado event in Connecticut history. A third tornado moved through Durham and Killingsworth, unroofing houses but again causing no injuries.[23][24]
  • July 14, 1881: A "terrific storm" downed trees "in all directions" in Meriden, also damaging a school and several other buildings.[26]
  • September 14, 1882: A tornado touched down outside of Winsted, destroying nine homes and five barns as it moved into town. Twenty people were injured, two of whom may have later died.[27]
  • August 25, 1885: A tornado passed through the towns of Bloomfield and Windsor, crossing the Connecticut River before dissipating. Nearly the entire tobacco crop in the area was destroyed, at a loss in the millions of dollars. Another tornado may have struck East Hartford a few weeks earlier.[28]
  • September 27, 1899: A tornado passed from Norwalk to near Ridgefield, causing damage to trees and roofs in a path 50 to 300 feet (15 to 91 m) wide. Some buildings were completely destroyed.[30]
  • September 15, 1901: A damaging tornado swept through the village of Huntington around 7 PM. One man was killed when his house was torn from its foundation. Several barns were destroyed—one "completely disappeared"—and hundreds of trees were leveled on a path from modern-day Shelton to Monroe.[31][32]
  • August 28, 1911: A tornado cut a 3-mile (5 km) path through New Milford, Litchfield County, uprooting trees and damaging roofs.[33]
  • June 12, 1918: A "baby tornado" (possibly a microburst) caused $50,000 in damage, mainly to roofs and windows, in New Britain, Hartford County.[34]
  • August 7, 1918: A possible tornado touched down in Westbrook, causing roof damage and downing trees. A house was moved off its foundation in Fenwick.[35][36]
  • September 18, 1918: A tornado cut a path 130 to 160 feet (40 to 50 m) wide from Groton, through Mystic, and out into Long Island Sound. Small buildings, roofs, trees and telephone poles were damaged heavily. Several people received minor injuries from flying debris.[37]
  • August 30, 1920: A storm with "tornado features" caused damage on a small line from eastern Hamden to Guilford. A fireworks factory was destroyed, roofs were removed from four warehouses and a house, and hundreds of trees and utility poles were toppled. One boy was killed and thirty-three others were injured.[38][39]
  • July 13, 1922: A weak tornado tracked across Hartford, downing tree branches and utility poles.[40]
  • July 26, 1937: A tornado produced F2 damage while passing just south of Terryville and just north of Bristol.[41]
  • September 24, 1942: A tornado destroyed a church in Plainville and a garage in Bristol along a 3-mile (5 km) path.[42]

1950–1974[edit]

Tornado tracks from 1950 to 1999 in Connecticut, with their ratings on the Fujita scale
  • July 12, 1950: An F2 tracked 10 miles (16 km) through Middlesex County.[1][43]
  • July 14, 1950: An F2 touched down in Ridgefield around 7:30 AM, tearing the roof off the high school and downing trees through the center of town. Three people were injured.[1][44]
  • August 20, 1951: An F2 briefly touched down in Willington, Tolland County.[45]
  • August 21, 1951: A long-tracked F2 touched down in southwestern Litchfield County, passing more than 40 miles (64 km) well into Hartford County. Another tornado, an F3 (some sources say F2), touched down in northern Middlesex County, unroofing a factory and causing $100,000 in damage. Nine people were injured in the first tornado, with another eight injured in the second.[43][46]
  • May 10, 1954: An F3 (some sources say F2) hit Windsorville at 9:30 AM, destroying a house and some sheds, injuring two and causing $30,000 in damage. Additionally, an F2 touched down in northwestern Hartford County that afternoon.[43][47]
  • October 24, 1955: An F1 touched down in central Hartford County, while an F2 touched down near Waterbury.[43]
  • June 19, 1957: An F1 touched down in central Glastonbury, Hartford County.[49]
  • August 15, 1958: An F1 briefly touched down in northern Fairfield.[50]
  • August 21, 1958: An F1 briefly touched down in Colebrook, Litchfield County.[51]
  • September 7, 1958: An F2 injured two in Willington, Tolland County.[52]
  • May 12, 1959: An F2 touched down in Salisbury, damaging mostly trees along a one-mile (1.6 km) path.[53]
  • May 30, 1959: An F1 briefly touched down in Bloomfield, damaging a few greenhouses.[54]
  • August 29, 1959: An F0 briefly touched down in southeastern New Haven County.[43]
  • April 26, 1961: An F1 briefly touched down in western Tolland County.[43]
  • May 24, 1962: An F3 tracked through northern New Haven and southern Hartford Counties. The tornado produced "near-F4 damage" in parts of Waterbury and Southington, with more than 200 buildings destroyed and another 600 damaged. One person was killed, with another fifty injured, and the tornado caused $4,000,000 in damage along its 11-mile (18 km) path.[43][55]
  • June 18, 1962: An F2 briefly touched down in eastern Litchfield County.[43]
  • August 19, 1965: An F2 tracked 6 miles (10 km) through northern Tolland County.[43]
  • August 11, 1966: An F2 touched down in northern Litchfield County, passing east-northeast into Massachusetts.[43]
  • August 9, 1968: An F1 briefly touched down near Danbury.[43]
  • August 17, 1968: An F1 touched down in southern Tolland County.[43]
  • August 20, 1968: An F1 briefly touched down in northern Litchfield County.[43]
  • October 3, 1970: An F1 injured one in northern Hartford County.[43]
  • July 19, 1971: An F2 touched down near Norwalk.[43]
  • July 29, 1971: An F3 (some sources say F2) moved along Main Street in downtown Waterbury, unroofing a factory and damaging some houses. Two people were injured.[43][56]
  • August 7, 1972: An F1 tracked almost 10 miles (16 km) across northern Litchfield County.[43]
  • August 9, 1972: An F1 touched down in southern Litchfield County.[43]
  • July 12, 1973: An F2 touched down in southeastern Litchfield County.[43]
  • June 28, 1973: An F1 injured one person in western Hartford County.[43]
  • June 29, 1973: An F1 touched down in northwestern Litchfield County.[43]
  • August 31, 1973: An F2 briefly touched down in central Hartford County.[43]
  • September 18, 1973: Three tornadoes briefly touched down, an F1 in Greenwich, an F2 in southwestern Hartford county, and another F1 in southern Tolland County.[43]
  • July 3, 1974: An F1 tracked 5 miles (8 km) southeast through southern Litchfield County.[43]

1975–1999[edit]

NEXRAD radar loop of the supercell, with a visible hook echo, which produced the May 29, 1995 tornado in Southbury
  • June 19, 1975: An F1 tracked 5 miles (8 km) through central Litchfield County.[43]
  • July 20, 1975: An F1 touched down near New Milford.[43]
  • June 30, 1976: An F2 touched down in northern Litchfield County.[43]
  • October 3, 1979: The Windsor Locks, Connecticut Tornado, an extremely destructive F4 tornado, one of the worst in Connecticut history, killed three and injured 500 in northern Hartford County. The tornado struck without warning, tearing through Bradley International Airport, destroying more than a dozen airplanes, and narrowly missing a Boeing 727 which was attempting to land. About 100 homes were completely leveled. Most of the $200+ million in damage was done in Windsor Locks and Suffield. This was the sixth-most damaging tornado in US history.[58]
  • July 28, 1982: An F1 tracked through central New Haven County.[43]
  • August 1, 1983: An F0 struck Middlesex County.[43]
  • July 5, 1984: An F2 tracked from Bristol to Farmington, injuring one person and causing $500,000 in damage to houses and cars.[43][59]
  • June 24, 1985: An F1 tracked 10 miles (16 km) across central Windham County.[43]
  • August 26, 1985: An F1 touched down in extreme eastern Windham County, passing into Rhode Island.[43]
  • July 10, 1989: The Northeastern United States tornado outbreak of 1989 produced at least three tornadoes in Litchfield and New Haven Counties, causing more than $100 million in damage. The first tornado, possibly a family of three tornadoes, destroyed Cathedral Pines Forest, and caused F2 damage to trees and homes in Cornwall, Milton, and Bantam, injuring four people.[60] The second tornado, also an F2, unroofed or severely damaged 50 homes and injured 70 people on a path through Watertown, Oakville, and northern Waterbury. The final tornado was one of the worst in Connecticut history, cutting a 5-mile (8 km) path through Hamden. The F4 destroyed almost 400 structures and injured 40 people. No one was killed by these devastating tornadoes, though a girl was killed when straight-line winds blew a tree onto her tent.
  • June 29, 1990: An F0 briefly touched down in Danbury. Seven people were injured by flying glass.[11]
  • July 14, 1992: An F1 briefly touched down in southern Windham County.[43]
  • August 4, 1992: An F0 struck central Hartford County, and an F1 struck the Long Hill section of Trumbull.[43][61]
  • July 10, 1993: An F0 briefly touched down in western Windham County.[43]
  • June 29, 1994: A strong microburst accompanied by an F0 struck Avon. Many trees were downed, but there was very little property damage.[62]
  • May 29, 1995: An F1 tracked 2 miles (3 km) from South Britain to Southbury around 6:20 PM. Many trees were downed, and several homes sustained minor damage.[63]
  • July 23, 1995: An F0 struck the town of Prospect. A tractor-trailer was thrown 200 yards (180 m) through the air, but no injuries were reported.[64]
  • July 9, 1996: An F1 downed trees in Monroe.[67]

2000–present[edit]

Damage in Newtown from the May 16, 2007 tornado
Damage to a power pole in Shelton from the July 31, 2009 tornado
  • August 16, 2000: An F1 touched down in Ellington. It tossed several large trailers through the air and damaged a cow barn.[70]
  • June 23, 2001: An isolated supercell produced three tornadoes in the state. The first, an F1, hit a golf course in Washington, demolishing a storage building and a tennis court, and injuring one person. The second tornado, rated an F2, touched down in Torrington near Torrington Middle School, damaging the roof and destroying bleachers and a storage shed. The final tornado, an F0, produced minor damage to the East Hartland fire station.[71][72][73]
  • July 1, 2001: An F0 tracked 10 miles (16 km) across southern Litchfield County, touching down seven times along its path from New Milford to Roxbury.[74]
  • June 6, 2002: An F1 destroyed two acres (8,000 m2) of "healthy mature forest" in Salisbury.[76]
  • June 16, 2002: An F0 briefly touched down in Lanesville. In Montville, a waterspout formed over Gardner Lake, causing F1 damage to trees, houses, and cars upon crossing onto land.[77][78]
  • July 12, 2006: The Westchester tornado that produced F2 damage across the border in New York entered Greenwich at 4:01 PM, producing F1 damage on the north side of town. It may have briefly touched down a second time just north of the Merritt Parkway.[79]
  • May 16, 2007: Just three months after the switch to the Enhanced Fujita Scale for rating tornadoes, a skipping tornado, rated EF1, tracked 4 to 5 miles (6 to 8 km) from Bethel to Newtown. Widespread wind damage also affected other parts of the state.[80]
  • May 28, 2007: An EF0 landspout damaged the roof of a barn in Somers, on an otherwise calm day.[81][82]
  • June 26, 2009: An EF1 tornado hit the town of Wethersfield. Widespread damage across town especially near the area of Wolcott Hill. Many downed trees caused damages, most notably in Old Wethersfield where a tree split a house in town, and destroyed a front porch.[83] Damage was estimated at around $2.4 million.[84]
  • July 31, 2009: Significant wind damage was reported across the state, including two EF1 tornadoes. The first tornado caused tree and minor property damage along a 0.5-mile (0.80 km) path through eastern Shelton.[85][86] The second downed trees along a sporadic 2.75-mile (4.4 km) path in Madison.[87] Many trees were also snapped and uprooted in Fairfield, Milford, Guilford, Chester, Old Lyme and Naugatuck.[88][89]
  • June 24, 2010: A tornado briefly touched down in downtown Bridgeport, embedded within a larger area of strong wind damage which downed trees and damaged several buildings. 9 roofs were damaged causing the city to declare a state of emergency.[90] The National Weather service confirmed it as an EF1 tornado, estimating it to be 100 yards wide with winds of at least 100 mph. The damage was especially concentrated to the east end of Bridgeport and the Lordship section of Stratford. Both areas were declared states of emergencies for at least 24 hours after the storm hit.[91]
  • July 21, 2010: Several severe storms spawned five brief tornadoes and spread straight-line wind damage across the state. One touchdown was reported in Litchfield, and an EF1 tornado was confirmed in Bristol. The Bristol tornado was on the ground for 1.5 miles (2.4 km) and had winds at 90 mph. A touchdown was also confirmed in Litchfield, Thomaston, the Terryville section of Plymouth and Bristol Wednesday afternoon, the National Weather Service said. The tornado touched down in East Litchfield around Litchfield Road, in Thomaston near D. Welter Way, in Terryville near North Street and in Bristol near Blakeslee and High streets. Tree tops were twisted off and several trees were uprooted. In Bristol, the tornado's path was 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long and about 25 yards (23 m) wide. Wind gusts were about 90 miles per hour (140 km/h). The paths in the other three towns were shorter. All of the touchdowns were caused by the same supercell.[1]
  • June 9, 2011: A brief EF1 tornado occurred within a larger area of straight-line winds in Litchfield County.[92]
  • July 1, 2013: A series of three tornadoes touch down across the state; one in Fairfield County and two in Hartford County. Majority of impact limited to downed trees, though the EF1 caused notable structural damage near East Windsor.[93][94]
  • July 10, 2013: An EF1 tornado caused tree damage along an 11.2-mile (18.0 km) long intermittent path in Tolland County.[95]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ Tornado Safety Rules Worth Reviewing Hartford Courant Online. Accessed 2008-05-13.
  3. ^ Grazulis, p. 18
  4. ^ a b Ludlam, pg. 201
  5. ^ Grazulis, p. 552
  6. ^ Ludlam, pp. 4–5
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  8. ^ "Untitled article". Hartford Courant. 1784-08-31. p. 3. Retrieved 2009-02-21. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Grazulis, p. 553
  10. ^ Ludlam, pp. 11–12
  11. ^ a b Tornado Project. "Worst" Tornadoes Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  12. ^ Cerveny, p. 317
  13. ^ a b c d Grazulis, p. 554
  14. ^ a b c Grazulis, p. 555
  15. ^ Grazulis, p. 556
  16. ^ a b Grazulis, p. 559
  17. ^ Cerveny, p. 43
  18. ^ a b Ludlam, pg. 203
  19. ^ Ludlam, pg. 204
  20. ^ Grazulis, p. 577
  21. ^ "A Connecticut hurricane". The New York Times. 1876-08-16. p. 5. 
  22. ^ "Furious storm in Connecticut". The New York Times. 1877-08-19. p. 7. 
  23. ^ Grazulis, p. 596
  24. ^ Annual Report of the Chief Signal-Officer (PDF). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1878. pp. 654–661. Retrieved 2008-05-14. 
  25. ^ Grazulis, p. 610
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  27. ^ Grazulis, p. 617
  28. ^ "Great damage elsewhere". The New York Times. 1885-08-26. p. 1. 
  29. ^ Grazulis, p. 641
  30. ^ "Tornado in Connecticut". The New York Times. 1899-09-28. p. 1. 
  31. ^ "Tornado in Connecticut". The New York Times. 1901-09-17. p. 7. 
  32. ^ "Great Electrical Storm". Bridgeport Evening Farmer. 1901-09-16. p. 1. 
  33. ^ "Tornado hits Connecticut". The New York Times. 1911-08-29. p. 2. 
  34. ^ "Baby Tornado Causes $50,000 Damage in New Britain Visit". Hartford Courant. 1918-06-13. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  35. ^ "Tornado Wrecks House at Fenwick". Hartford Courant. 1918-08-10. p. 3. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  36. ^ "Cyclone Rages along the Shore". Hartford Courant. 1918-08-09. p. 9. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  37. ^ "Cyclone Damages M. F. Plant's Estate". Hartford Courant. 1918-09-19. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  38. ^ "One Dead, Many Hurt In North Haven Whirlwind". Hartford Courant. 1920-09-01. p. 1. 
  39. ^ "Tuesday's Storm". Hartford Courant. 1920-09-02. p. 10. 
  40. ^ "Hats, Trees, Wires Suffer in Storm". Hartford Courant. 1922-07-14. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  41. ^ Grazulis, p. 873
  42. ^ Grazulis, p. 904
  43. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak Data from the Storm Prediction Center archives, which are accessible through SeverePlot, free software created and maintained by John Hart, lead forecaster for the SPC.
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  45. ^ "Event Record Details, 20 Aug 1951, 1530 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  46. ^ Grazulis, p. 960
  47. ^ Grazulis, p. 980
  48. ^ "Event Record Details, 08 Aug 1956, 1530 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  49. ^ "Event Record Details, 19 Jun 1957, 1400 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  50. ^ "Event Record Details, 15 Aug 1958, 1150 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  51. ^ "Event Record Details, 21 Aug 1958, 1915 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  52. ^ "Event Record Details, 07 Sep 1958, 1510 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  53. ^ "Event Record Details, 12 May 1959, 1545 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  54. ^ "Event Record Details, 30 May 1959, 1430 CST". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  55. ^ Grazulis, p. 1042
  56. ^ Grazulis, p. 1127
  57. ^ Grazulis, p. 1144
  58. ^ Grazulis, p. 1216
  59. ^ Grazulis, p. 1261
  60. ^ Grazulis, p. 1289
  61. ^ Chris, Sheridan (1992-08-05). "Tornado touches down in Trumbull". Hartford Courant. p. D.1. 
  62. ^ "Event Record Details, 29 Jun 1994, 1416 EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  63. ^ "Event Record Details, 29 May 1995, 1823 EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  64. ^ "Event Record Details, 23 Jul 1995, 1830 EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  65. ^ "Event Record Details, 03 Jul 1996, 05:40:00 AM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  66. ^ Stewart, Barbara (1996-07-05). "Connecticut Hit By a Tornado, Hail and Floods". New York Times. p. D.1. 
  67. ^ "Event Record Details, 09 Jul 1996, 06:00:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  68. ^ "Event Record Details, 31 May 1998, 08:30:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  69. ^ "Event Record Details, 30 Jun 1998, 07:30:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  70. ^ "Event Record Details, 16 Aug 2000, 12:35:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  71. ^ "Event Record Details, 23 Jun 2001, 01:00:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  72. ^ "Event Record Details, 23 Jun 2001, 01:50:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  73. ^ "Event Record Details, 23 Jun 2001, 02:18:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  74. ^ "Event Record Details, 01 Jul 2001, 03:25:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
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  76. ^ "Event Record Details, 05 Jun 2002, 10:55:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
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  78. ^ "Event Record Details, 16 Jun 2002, 04:30:00 PM EST". NCDC Storm Events database. National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  79. ^ National Weather Service, Upton, New York (2006-07-14). "Public Information Statement" (Text file). Retrieved 2007-06-02. 
  80. ^ National Weather Service, Upton, New York (2007-05-18). "Public Information Statement" (Text file). Retrieved 2007-06-02. 
  81. ^ Associated Press (2007-05-28). "Small twister hits Somers". Connecticut Post. p. A7. Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-06-01. 
  82. ^ Storm Prediction Center (2007-06-01). "20070528's Storm Reports". Retrieved 2007-06-02. 
  83. ^ Weather Service Confirms It: Tornado Hit Wethersfield Friday
  84. ^ Officials: Tornado touched down in Conn.
  85. ^ Tornado Hits Shelton
  86. ^ Public Information Statement...Corrected
  87. ^ Goodman/GC/MAS (2009-08-06). "Public Information Statement". Upton, New York: National Weather Service. Archived from the original on 2009-08-07. Retrieved 2009-08-06. 
  88. ^ 20090731's Storm Report
  89. ^ Public Information Statement
  90. ^ Joe, Pollina (June 25, 2010). "Public Information Statement". National Weather Service in Upton, New York. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Archived from the original on 2010-06-25. Retrieved 2010-06-25. 
  91. ^ "Tornado confirmed in Bridgeport". Connecticut Post. June 25, 2010. Retrieved 2012-09-08. 
  92. ^ "Connecticut Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2011. Retrieved July 15, 2013. 
  93. ^ "Tornado Confirmed In The Towns Of Greenwich And Stamford In Fairfield County Connecticut". National Weather Service Office in Upton, New York. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. July 2, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  94. ^ "Tornado Confirmed Near Windsor in Hartford County Connecticut". National Weather Service Office in Taunton, Massachusetts. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. July 1, 2013. Retrieved July 11, 2013. 
  95. ^ "Tornado Confirmed Near Andover...Coventry and Mansfield in Tolland County CT". National Weather Service Office in Boston, Massachusetts. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. July 12, 2013. Retrieved July 15, 2013. 

Book citations[edit]

  • Grazulis, Thomas P (July 1993). Significant Tornadoes 1680–1991. St. Johnsbury, VT: The Tornado Project of Environmental Films. ISBN 1-879362-03-1. 
  • Ludlum, David McWilliams (1970). Early American Tornadoes 1586–1870. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society. ISBN 0-933876-32-7. 
  • Cerveny, Randy (2005). Freaks of the Storm. Thunder's Mouth Press. ISBN 1-56025-801-2. Retrieved 2009-01-21. 

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