List of Cornish writers

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Caroline Fox[1][2][3]

This is a list of writers in English and Cornish, who are associated with Cornwall and Cornish linguists. Not all of them are native Cornish people.

Some Cornish writers have reached a high level of prominence, e.g. William Golding, who won the Nobel Prize for literature (in 1983), D. M. Thomas who won the Cheltenham Prize for Literature and Arthur Quiller-Couch ("Q").

Some of the "incomers" have written extensively about Cornwall and the Cornish, e.g. Daphne du Maurier, who went as far as joining Mebyon Kernow.

Historians and scholars[edit]

See List of Cornish historians

Novelists[edit]

Poets[edit]

Playwrights and dramatists[edit]

Children's writers[edit]

Linguists and writers in Cornish[edit]

Henry Jenner

Bards of the Gorseth Kernow[edit]

This is an honorary position, not all of the bards are Cornish or based in Cornwall. For purposes of brevity, those mentioned above are not repeated.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox, Caroline (1883). Horace N. Pym, ed. Memories of Old Friends. London: Smith, Elder, and Co.  – Frontispiece, from an etching by Sir Hubert Herkomer, after a painting by Samuel Laurence, depicting Caroline Fox, age 27. Volume 1 available online at Internet Archive and Volume 2 at Internet Archive
  2. ^ Robinson, William (1891). Friends of a Half Century. London: Edward Hicks. Retrieved 9 December 2007.  – page 138
  3. ^ Memories . . .
  4. ^ "Janie Bolitho". Retrieved 21 March 2009. 
  5. ^ Margaret Forster, 'Du Maurier, Dame Daphne (1907–1989)’, rev., Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 20 Dec 2008
  6. ^ Kevin McCarron, 'Golding, Sir William Gerald (1911–1993)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 20 Dec 2008
  7. ^ Dennis Barker, 'Graham, Winston Mawdsley (1908?–2003)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edn, Oxford University Press, Jan 2007 accessed 20 Dec 2008
  8. ^ Heald, Tim (12 March 2008). "Curriculum Vitae". Tim Heald's website. Retrieved 20 December 2008. 
  9. ^ R. G. Burnett, 'Hocking, Silas Kitto (1850–1935)’, rev. Sayoni Basu, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  10. ^ Podolsky, J. D.; Wright, John (13 September 1993). "John Le Carre". People. Retrieved 20 December 2008. 
  11. ^ "Charles Lee, author". Cornwall Calling. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  12. ^ "Jessica Mann". Retrieved 21 March 2009. 
  13. ^ "An Interview with Angie Sage". BookBrowse. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  14. ^ a b Old Croydonian Teachers database
  15. ^ Michael Millgate, 'Hardy, Thomas (1840–1928)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  16. ^ Michell, Roger (15 June 2005). "Obituary: Nick Darke". The Observer. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  17. ^ Walter and Wilbur
  18. ^ Kernowland children's novels
  19. ^ Matthew Spriggs, 'Boson family (per. c.1675–1730)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  20. ^ S. Mendyk, 'Carew, Richard (1555–1620)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  21. ^ Sale, Jonathan (31 July 2005). "How do you say 'bugger off' in Cornish?". The Observer. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  22. ^ "Piw on ni? Who are we?". Kesva an Taves Kernewek and Cornish. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  23. ^ Peter W. Thomas, 'Jenner, Henry (1848–1934)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edn, Oxford University Press, May 2005 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  24. ^ Brian Murdoch, 'Nance, Robert Morton (1873–1959)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  25. ^ Matthew Spriggs, 'Scawen, William (1600–1689)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  26. ^ "The Tregear Homilies". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 

External links[edit]