Campus of Dartmouth College

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A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. From left to right: the Fairchild Physical Sciences Center (consisting of Burke, Steele, Fairchild and Wilder Halls) and Wheeler Hall.

Dartmouth College is located in the rural town of Hanover in the Upper Valley of the Connecticut River in the New England state of New Hampshire. Dartmouth's 269-acre (1.09 km2) campus centered on The Green makes the institution the largest private landowner of the town of Hanover,[1] and its landholdings and facilities are valued at an estimated $419 million.[2] Dartmouth's campus buildings vary in age from several early 19th century buildings to a number of ongoing construction projects. Most of Dartmouth's buildings are designed in the Georgian style,[3][4][5] a theme which has been preserved in recent architectural additions.[6]

Undergraduate college facilities[edit]

Academic and administrative buildings[edit]

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
44 North College Street Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 44 College Street.JPG 1855 or earlier 44 North College Street was privately owned until at least 1954. Under the College's stewardship, it has served as a Russian language immersion house and an international students' house. Currently, it houses Off-Campus Programs. [7][8]
Baker Memorial Library Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Baker Memorial Library 01.JPG 1928 Baker Library was built to replace the Wilson Hall library with money donated by George Fisher Baker in memory of his uncle, Fisher Ames Baker. The Reserve Corridor in the basement are decorated by a fresco by José Clemente Orozco called The Epic of American Civilization. Baker's iconic 200-foot (61 m) tower is often used as a symbolic representation of the College. [9][10][11][12]
Bartlett Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Bartlett Hall 01.JPG 1890–1891 Bartlett Hall was originally constructed as the College's YMCA headquarters. Today it houses the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures and the Program in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. [13]
Berry Library Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Berry Library.JPG 1998–2000 Berry Library is an 80,000-square-foot (7,400 m2) addition to Baker Memorial Library, named for George Berry. It stands on the site of the 1931 Dragon Hall, among other buildings. [14]
Burke Laboratory Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Burke Hall 01.JPG 1993–1994 Part of the Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center, the Burke Laboratory is adjoined to the Fairchild Building and currently houses the Chemistry Department offices and laboratories. [15]
Carpenter Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Carpenter Hall.JPG 1929 Carpenter currently houses the Art History Department, its Sherman Art Library, and the Program in Women's and Gender Studies. [16]
Carson Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Carson Hall.JPG 2002 Carson Hall, connected to Berry Library, houses the History Department. [17]
Clement Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Clement Hall.JPG 1914 Originally built as an auto garage, Clement housed art studios and workspace and the entire Animation section of the Film and Media Studies Department until it was demolished in February 2010. [18] [19]
Dartmouth Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Dartmouth Hall 02.JPG 1904–1906 The original Dartmouth Hall, constructed in 1784, was the oldest College building until it burned in 1904. It was reconstructed the following year, and its replacement houses the Department of French and Italian Languages and Literatures, Department of German Studies, and Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures. [20]
Charles Gilman Life Sciences Laboratory Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Gilman Life Sciences Laboratory.JPG 1964 Gilman houses the Biological Sciences Department and is connected to the Dartmouth Medical School. [21]
Haldeman Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Haldeman Center 01.JPG 2004–2006 The Haldeman Center houses the Institute for the Study of Applied and Professional Ethics, the Fannie and Alan Leslie Center for the Humanities at Dartmouth College, and The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding. [22]
Hopkins Center for the Creative and Performing Arts Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Hopkins Center for the Arts 01.JPG 1962 Designed by famed architect Wallace Harrison, the Hopkins Center ("the Hop") houses Dartmouth's Music, Studio Art, and Theater departments. It also contains several auditoriums, a dining facility, and the Paddock Music Library. [23]
Kemeny Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Kemeny Hall 01.JPG 2004–2006 Kemeny Hall is the home of the Mathematics Department, which had previously been scattered among multiple buildings for more than 25 years. [22]
McNutt Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 McNutt Hall 01.JPG 1902–1904 Originally named Tuck Hall, McNutt housed the Tuck School of Business until 1930. Today, the building houses the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, the Office of the Registrar, and Student Financial Services. [24]
Moore Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Moore Psychology Building.JPG 1996–1998 Moore Hall houses the Psychological and Brain Sciences Department. [25]
Parkhurst Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Parkhurst Hall.JPG 1911 This building houses administrative offices, including the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Dean of the College, and Office of Undergraduate Judicial Affairs. [26]
Raven House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Raven House.JPG 1944 or later Raven was built as a "convalescent home" for patients of the hospital that formerly stood nearby. In 1989, Dartmouth purchased the building and converted it to use for computing administration. It also houses the Department of Education. [27]
Reed Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Reed Hall 01.JPG 1839–1840 Reed was originally constructed to house Dartmouth's library, which was previously located in the nearby Dartmouth Hall. In the late 19th century, it came to be used partially as a dormitory, and today is home to the Department of Classics, Department of Russian Language and Literature, Comparative Literature Program, Jewish Studies Program, and Linguistics and Cognitive Science Program. [28]
Rockefeller Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Rockefeller Center.JPG 1983 Named after U.S. Vice President and Dartmouth alumnus Nelson Rockefeller, this annex to Silsby Hall contains the Department of Economics and the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences. [29]
Sanborn House Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sanborn Hall.JPG 1929 Sanborn House houses the English Department. [30]
Shattuck Observatory Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Shattuck Observatory.JPG 1854 Shattuck is an observatory and is the oldest scientific building at Dartmouth. It stands on a hill behind the Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center. [31]
Fairchild Building Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center.JPG 1972–1974 Part of the Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center, the Fairchild Building houses the Department of Geography and the Department of Earth Sciences. [32]
Sherman House Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sherman House 01.JPG 1883 Originally the home of Dartmouth professor Frank A. Sherman, the Sherman House belonged to Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity from 1928 until the 1950s. Today, it houses Dartmouth's Native American Studies Program. [33]
Silsby Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Silsby Hall 01.JPG 1927–1928 Silsby Hall currently houses the Department of Anthropology, Department of Government, and Department of Sociology, Program in African and African-American Studies, Program in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies, and Program in Mathematics and Social Sciences. [34]
Steele Chemistry Building Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Steele Chemistry Building.JPG 1920–1921 Part of the Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center, the Steele Building used to house the Chemistry department until its move to Burke Laboratory. It is used by the Department of Earth Sciences now and is home to the Environmental Studies Program and the Geochemistry laboratories. [35][36]
Sudikoff Laboratory Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Sudikoff Hall.JPG 1968 Originally the mental health facility for the hospital that formerly stood nearby, Sudikoff now houses Computer Science and its laboratories. [37]
Thornton Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Thornton Hall 02.JPG 1828–1829 Thornton Hall was originally a dormitory. Today, it houses the Religion and Philosophy departments. [38]
Webster Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Webster Hall 04.JPG 1901–1907 Originally an auditorium and concert hall, Webster Hall was temporarily home to the town's Nugget Theater and served as the location for Commencement ceremonies from 1908-1930. In 1998, the building was redesigned to house the Rauner Special Collections Library. [39]
Wentworth Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Wentworth Hall 02.JPG 1828–1829 Wentworth served as a dormitory until 1912, when major internal reconstruction transformed it into academic and office space. [40]
Wilder Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Wilder Hall 01.JPG 1897–1899 Part of the Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center, Wilder Hall houses the Physics and Astronomy Department. [41][42]
Wilson Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Wilson Hall 01.JPG 1884–1885 Wilson was built as the first library building of the College. It later housed the anthropology department and the College museum, before the latter was moved to the Hood Museum of Art. Currently, Wilson houses film studios, the Film and Media Studies Department, and a practice hall. [43]

Residential buildings[edit]

As opposed to ungrouped dormitories or "residential colleges" as employed at such institutions as Yale University or Princeton University (in imitation of the colleges of Cambridge and Oxford), Dartmouth residence halls are grouped into nine "communities," each composed of one to three "clusters" of dormitories.[44] Dartmouth houses approximately 3,300 students in its facilities, or about 85% of the student body; the remaining 15% opt to live in off-campus housing.[44] The Housing Office consists of three employees that house students four times a year (not including the interim period), due to the college's enrollment plan (the "D-Plan").

Every cluster or group of clusters is administered by a live-in Community Director.[45] Approximately one-third of the rooms are singles; the remaining rooms vary among "one, two, and three-room doubles, one, two, and three-room triples, two, three, and four-room quads, apartments and suites."[45]

Affinity programs[edit]

Affinity programs are a housing option for Dartmouth students, described as "residentially-based, educationally-purposeful living opportunities for residents that center around a self-defined Academic or Special Interest programmatic focus."[46] Some affinity programs are housed in sections or on floors of larger dormitories; those listed below are only the programs in their own free-standing structures.

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Chinese Language House Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Chinese Language House.JPG 1951 8 The building was built as a residence for the headmaster of the Clark Preparatory School. It became the Asian Studies Center in 1985 and the Chinese Language House in 2007. [46][47]
Brewster Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Brewster International House.JPG 1938 26 Originally constructed to house employees of the Hanover Inn, Brewster Hall also served as the house for Epsilon Kappa Theta sorority before hosting the International House in 1994. [46][48]
Cutter Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Cutter-Shabazz 02.JPG 1938 26 Cutter Hall was built for the Clark Preparatory School and purchased by Dartmouth in 1953. Since 1970, it has been the home of the Afro-American Society and El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz Center for Intellectual Inquiry. [46][49]
Foley House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Foley House.JPG 1931 or later 10 By the mid-1980s, Dartmouth had acquired this privately owned building and began using it as an Outward Bound House. Foley House houses the Foley Cooperative, where residents communally participate in cooking, eating, and household chores. [46][50]
La Casa Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 La Casa.JPG 1820 ca. 10 This house was initially operated as a private hospital before coming into the hands of private citizens, including a Dean of the Thayer School of Engineering. The College acquired it around 1936. La Casa is an affinity house for students interested in Spanish languages and cultures. [46][51]
Native American House Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Native Americans at Dartmouth House.JPG 1852 16 This structure first served as a bakery and confectionery. In the early 20th century, it was owned by Lambda Chi Alpha and Pi Lambda Theta fraternities. During the 1960s, it became the Occom Inn, before finally being purchased by the College in 1993. It now serves as the Native American House, providing "cultural, social and educational enrichment for Native and other Dartmouth students." [46][52]
Pike House Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean House 01.JPG 1874 14 This building served as a dormitory until the 1920s, also housing Epsilon Kappa Phi fraternity. Since 1999, it has been known as the Latin American, Latino and Caribbean (LALACS) House. [53]

The Choate Cluster[edit]

The modernist Choate Cluster is an all-freshman residence cluster principally consisting of Bissell, Brown, Cohen and Little, part of an "experiment in student living". The cluster includes four dormitories and two lounges. Each pair of T-shaped dorms is attached to a single lounge via glass-enclosed above-ground walkways that are referred to as "hamster tunnels". The dorms include one-room doubles and one-room singles. Each dorm is three floors high and connected to the lounge on the second floor. The cluster was constructed on land acquired from Cardigan Mountain School and was the first major construction project of John Sloan Dickey's presidency. The cluster cost $1.5 million to build, and was partially funded by the U.S. Housing and Home Finance Administration.[54]

The nearby North Hall is administratively part of the cluster, but was not constructed at the same time, and does not house freshmen.

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Bissell Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Bissell Hall.JPG 1956–1958 76 Bissell Hall is connected to Cohen, with which it shares a lounge. [55][56]
Brown Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Brown Hall.JPG 1956–1958 77 Brown Hall is named for trustee Albert O. Brown. [55][57]
Cohen Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Cohen Hall.JPG 1956–1958 77 Suite 103 of Cohen Hall was notably the residence of future Finnish Prime Minister Paavo Lipponen during his year at Dartmouth, 1960–1961, as well as future IBM CEO Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. [55][58]
Little Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Little Hall 01.JPG 1956–1958 75 Little Hall is named for Trustee Clarence Little. [54][55]
North Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 North Hall.JPG 1922–1923 19 North Hall was built as a dormitory for the Clark Preparatory School. It was acquired by the College in 1953. North Hall is the smallest of the College's residence halls. [55][59]

East Wheelock Cluster[edit]

The East Wheelock Cluster stands at the end of East Wheelock Street and consists of five buildings. Initially known as "the new dorms," the construction of the post-modern Andres, Morton and Zimmerman was inspired by the Houses at Harvard University and the residential colleges at Yale University. Sponsored by the class of 1943, the first three halls of the cluster were constructed in 1987, with McCulloch being added in 2000. East Wheelock is reputed to be a quieter and more intellectual housing cluster, and requires an application form for students wishing to live there. The Ledyard Apartments stand nearby and house upperclass students.

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Andres Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Andres Hall 05.JPG 1985–1987 82 [60][61]
Ledyard Apartments Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 19 East Wheelock Street.JPG 1921 18 The Ledyard Apartments were originally constructed to house new faculty members. Today, they provide apartment-style living for upperclass students. [60][62]
McCulloch Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 McCulloch Hall 01.JPG 1999–2000 76 McCulloch Hall, named for trustee Norman E. McCulloch, Jr. '50, is the most recent addition to the cluster. The $8 million building features an "unconventional" communal bathroom system and basement classroom facilities. [60][63]
Morton Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Morton Hall 01.JPG 1985–1987 67 [60][64]
Zimmerman Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Zimmerman Hall 01.JPG 1985–1987 84 [60][65]

The Fayerweather Cluster[edit]

The "Fayers", built on the hill behind Dartmouth Hall, are named for the New York merchant Daniel B. Fayerweather. The cluster is sponsored by the class of 1961.[66]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Fayerweather Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Mid Fayerweather Hall.JPG 1899–1900 107 Fayerweather Hall, now known as "mid-Fayer," cost $44,060 when it was constructed at the turn of the 20th century. It became a barracks in 1918 and was completely reconstructed in 1928-1930. [66][67]
North Fayerweather Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 North Fayerweather Hall 01.JPG 1906–1907 56 "North Fayer" cost $30,530 to build and was joined to Fayerweather Hall in 1984-1985 by a subterranean passage. [66][68]
South Fayerweather Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 South Fayerweather Hall.JPG 1907 63 "South Fayer", which cost $35,686 to build, burned to its skeleton in December 1909; students escaped by jumping from their windows. Notable past residents include Dartmouth Outing Club founder Fred Harris '11, who injured his knee escaping the fire. The building was rebuilt in 1910. [66][69]

Gold Coast Cluster[edit]

The Gold Coast cluster, located along Tuck Drive, comprises three dormitories. It was so named because during the Great Depression, it was the most expensive cluster to occupy.[70]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Gile Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Gile Hall 02.JPG 1928 112 Gile Hall, named for trustee John M. Gile, cost $208,000 to build. It was operated as the "U.S.S. Gile" during World War II. [70][71]
Lord Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Lord Hall.JPG 1929 78 Lord Hall, named for trustee John K. Lord, was built alongside Streeter Hall for a combined $297,000. [71][72]
Streeter Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Streeter Hall.JPG 1929 67 Streeter Hall, named for trustee General Frank Streeter, was built alongside Gile Hall for a combined $297,000. The ground floor was remodeled in 1989 to include a kitchen and lounge. [71][73]

Massachusetts Row Cluster[edit]

The "Mass Row" cluster is popular for its convenient location to Thayer Dining Hall and the Collis Center.[71] It houses only upperclass students.

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Hitchcock Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Hitchcock Hall.JPG 1913 86 Named for the Hitchcock Estate on which it was built, Hitchcock Hall served briefly as a barracks in 1918. It opened in January 2008 for Winter Term after undergoing extensive renovation and remodeling. [74][75]
Massachusetts Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Mid Massachusetts Hall 02.JPG 1907 111 Generally called "Mid Mass," this dormitory cost $80,000 to build. Notable past residents include U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop '37 in room 310, television host Fred Rogers '50 in room 101, and football coach Dave Shula '81 in room 107. [71][76][77]
North Massachusetts Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 North Massachusetts Hall 02.JPG 1912 68 "North Mass" was once home to U.S. Congressman Paul Tsongas '62 in room 301. [71][78]
South Massachusetts Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 South Massachusetts Hall 01.JPG 1912 68 "South Mass" functioned as a sick bay for the Naval Training School that operated at Dartmouth during World War II. Notable past residents include actor Andrew Shue '89 in room 305. [71][79]

McLaughlin Cluster[edit]

The McLaughlin Cluster, named for former Dartmouth president David T. McLaughlin '54, Tu '55, consists of six buildings and houses 342 students.[80] It cost more than $41 million to build. Located in Goldstein Hall is Occom Commons, a community space described as "state-of-the-art." The cluster earned silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council LEED program for its environmentally friendly design.[81]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Reference
Berry Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Berry Hall.JPG 2004–2006 43 [80][81]
Bildner Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Bildner Hall.JPG 2004–2006 61 [80][81]
Byrne Hall II Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Byrne II Hall.JPG 2004–2006 49 [80][81]
Goldstein Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Goldstein Hall.JPG 2004–2006 39 [80][81]
Rauner Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Rauner Hall 01.JPG 2004–2006 75 [80][81]
Thomas Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Thomas Hall.JPG 2004–2006 75 [80][81]

Ripley-Woodward-Smith Cluster[edit]

This cluster, known as "RipWoodSmith," cost $260,000 to build in 1930. Its buildings are named for three of the earliest tutors at the College: Sylvanus Ripley, Bezaleel Woodward, and John Smith. Women were not permitted to live in Ripley or Smith until 1989, although Woodward served as one of two exclusively women's dorms until the same year.[82]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Ripley Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Ripley Hall.JPG 1930 45 [66][82]
Smith Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Smith Hall.JPG 1930 47 Notable past residents include Robert Reich '68, who lived in room 208 during his freshman year. [66][82]
Woodward Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Woodward Hall 02.JPG 1930 45 [66][82]

The River Cluster[edit]

Originally known as "the Wigwams," the River Cluster is so named for its location near the banks of the Connecticut River. The all-freshman portion of the River dorms now comprises only two dormitories, with Hinman Hall being demolished to make way for the Tuck LLC (see below). The other two are apartment facilities.

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Channing Cox Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Channing Cox Hall.JPG 1976 68 Channing Cox, along with Maxwell Hall, is an apartment facility. [83][84]
French Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 French Hall.JPG 1958–1962 98 French Hall is an all-freshman dorm and was remodeled in 1985. [83][85]
Judge Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Judge Hall.JPG 1958–1962 87 Judge Hall, formerly McLane Hall, is one of two all-freshmen dormitories in the River. [83][86]
Maxwell Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Maxwell Hall.JPG 1982 68 Maxwell, along with Channing Cox, is an apartment facility. [83][87]

Russell Sage Cluster[edit]

The Russell Sage Cluster sits between Tuck Mall and Webster Avenue on land from the 45-acre (18 ha) 1912 donation of the Hitchcock Estate to the College. The Tuck Mall Residence Halls, Fahey and McLane, were added in 2006 at the collective cost of $19 million.[88]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Butterfield Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Butterfield Hall.JPG 1940 55 Butterfield was named for philanthropist Ralph Butterfield (class of 1839), who donated the school's natural history museum (since demolished). It was the last pre-World War II dormitory constructed at Dartmouth. The Hyphen, a lounge constructed in 1988-1989, connects Butterfield to Russell Sage Hall. [89][90]
Fahey Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Fahey Hall.JPG 2005–2006 62 [89][91]
McLane Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 McLane Hall.JPG 2005–2006 99 [89][91]
Russell Sage Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-21 03 - Russell Sage Hall.JPG 1922–1923 119 Russell Sage is the oldest building of the cluster, named after the Russell Sage Foundation and designed in part by architect John Russell Pope. The Hyphen, a lounge constructed in 1988-1989, connects Russell Sage to Butterfield Hall. [89][92]

Topliff-New Hampshire Cluster[edit]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
The Lodge Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 The Lodge.JPG 1961 72 The Lodge was originally the Hanover Inn Motor Lodge, located on Lebanon Street in downtown Hanover. It was converted for student use in 1974. [93][94]
New Hampshire Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 New Hampshire Hall.JPG 1908 120 New Hampshire Hall, known as "New Hamp", cost $80,000 to build. It was remodeled in 1928-1930, and will undergo complete renovation starting in 2008. Notable past residents include Reggie Williams '76 who lived in room 211 during his freshman year. [93][95]
Topliff Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Topliff Hall 03.JPG 1920 174 Named for benefactor Elijah M. Topliff, this residence hall cost $355,000 to build. It was built to accommodate the post-World War I influx of students, and when constructed, was the largest dormitory on campus. Notable past residents include Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel) '25 in room 416 and Louise Erdrich '76 in room 303. [93][96]

Wheeler-Richardson Cluster[edit]

Building Image Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Richardson Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Richardson Hall 02.JPG 1897–1898 63 Richardson is the oldest building on campus still used as a residence hall. It cost $49,013 to build. Room 108 housed the unofficial headquarters of Dartmouth Outing Club sub-group Cabin & Trail from 1968 to 1982. [97][98]
Wheeler Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Wheeler Hall 03.JPG 1905 106 Wheeler Hall cost $83,135 to build. It was featured in a 1974 Pepsi commercial centering around the College's Winter Carnival tradition. [97][99]

Greek houses and other undergraduate societies[edit]

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
Alpha Chi Alpha Dartmouth AXA.jpg 1896 The Alpha Chi Alpha house was built and owned by the Emery family before being occupied by Alpha Chi Rho fraternity between 1956 and 1961. In 1963, the organization became Alpha Chi Alpha. [100]
Alpha Delta Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Alpha Delta 03.JPG 192X Alpha Delta Phi built this house to replace their prior home on the same plot. In 1969, the name was changed to Alpha Delta. [101]
Alpha Theta Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Alpha Theta 02.JPG 1940–1941 The Alpha Theta house, built by AΘ's predecessor fraternity Theta Chi, was a replacement for an older building whose furnace leaked, killing nine house members. [102]
Amarna Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Amarna 03.JPG 192X Amarna, a College undergraduate society, moved into this house on East Wheelock Street in 1993. [103]
Beta Alpha Omega Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Alpha Zeta Delta.JPG 1931 After being removed from campus in 1997, Beta Theta Pi was reformed as Beta Alpha Omega in the fall of 2008, re-occupying its house after renting it to sorority Alpha Xi Delta during its time off-campus. [104]
Bones Gate Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Bones Gate 02.JPG 1925 Bones Gate, formerly Delta Tau Delta, moved into this house from an older structure on North Main Street. It was rebuilt following a fire in 1929. [105]
Casque and Gauntlet Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Casque & Gauntlet.JPG 1823 This house at 1 South Main Street houses Casque & Gauntlet, a senior society founded in 1886. [106]
Chi Gamma Epsilon Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Chi Gamma Epsilon.JPG 1937 Kappa Sigma, later Chi Gamma Epsilon, built this structure as a replacement for their 1915 building. [107]
Chi Heorot Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Chi Heorot 03.JPG 1929 c. The Chi Heorot house at 11 East Wheelock Street was built to replace their 1795 structure. [108]
Cobra Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Cobra Hall.JPG 1898-1915 ca. This College-owned house at 13 Summer Street served as Dartmouth's Hillel house before the Roth Center for Jewish Life was finished in 1998. It is now used by Cobra, a women's senior society founded in 1979. [109]
Delta Delta Delta Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Delta Delta Delta 01.JPG 1898 The Delta Delta Delta house was built as a faculty duplex, and its halves were variously occupied by Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity and College substance-free housing. Tri-Delt occupied the house around 1992, and its two halves were joined around 1994. [110]
Dragon Society Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Dragon Society.JPG 1995–1996 The Dragon Society's former tomb was demolished to make way for Berry Library, and the College helped build this one as replacement. It stands on a hill overlooking College Street. [111]
Epsilon Kappa Theta Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Epsilon Kappa Theta 01.JPG 1896 This house was built for a professor and was leased to the Mary Hitchock Memorial Hospital School of Nursing during the 1940s. After being occupied by a number of failed coeducational societies, it was obtained by the College. EKT began renting it in 1991. [112]
Fire & Skoal House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Fire and Skoal House.JPG 1893-1896 ca. Fire & Skoal, a senior society, has occupied this building on Park Street since 1984. [113]
Gamma Delta Chi Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Gamma Delta Chi 01.JPG 1936 ca. This house was built following the merger of two societies to form Gamma Delta Chi. The house has an underground basketball court underneath the porch. [114]
Kappa Delta Epsilon Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Kappa Delta Epsilon.JPG 1898–1899 Privately owned until 1950, the house was used as the initial location of the Foley House until Alpha Chi Omega, eventually KDE, obtained it in 1984. [115]
Kappa Kappa Gamma Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Kappa Kappa Gamma.JPG 1842 Originally standing on the site of the east entrance to Baker Library, this house was moved to its present location on East Wheelock Street in the 1920s. Kappa Kappa Gamma has occupied it since before 1986. [116]
Kappa Kappa Kappa Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Kappa Kappa Kappa 02.JPG 1925 Tri-Kap's third residence, at 1 Webster Avenue, was funded by the College in return for the fraternity's property on the site of Silsby Hall. [117]
Panarchy Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Panarchy 02.JPG 1835 Panarchy resides in an off-campus house with a Doric temple front and cupola. It was bought in the early 20th century by a local fraternity whose descendant, Phi Sigma Psi, became the current undergraduate society of Panarchy around 1992. [118]
Phi Delta Alpha Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Phi Delta Alpha.JPG 1902 Phi Delta Theta was the first fratenity to establish itself on Webster Avenue. In 1960, its name changed to Phi Delta Alpha. [119]
Phi Tau Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Phi Tau 01.JPG 2002 Phi Tau's current building was built as part of Dartmouth's construction of Berry Library and other north campus development. [120]
Psi Upsilon Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Psi Upsilon 02.JPG 1908 Psi Upsilon's house was constructed on an empty lot previously housing a local hatter. [121]
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 02.JPG 1931 This structure replaced Sigma Alpha Epsilon's house on the same site. [122]
Sigma Delta Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sigma Delta 03.JPG 1936–1937 Originally belonging to Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, the College bought this structure in the 1970s and rented it to Dartmouth's first sorority, Sigma Kappa (later Sigma Delta). [123]
Sigma Nu Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sigma Nu 02.JPG 1925 Sigma Nu's house at 12 Webster Avenue has undergone numerous alterations since its 1925 construction. [124]
Sigma Phi Epsilon Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sigma Phi Epsilon.JPG 1896 This house was privately owned until at least 1950; the College acquired the property from the Cardigan Mountain School in 1953 and leased it to Sigma Phi Epsilon later that year. A wing was added in 1959. The fraternity purchased the property in 1964. In June 2010, the fraternity demolished the worn out and now inadequate building to make room for a new house completed at the end of 2010. [125]
Sphinx Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Sphinx 03.JPG 1903 The Sphinx tomb on East Wheelock Street was designed by Manchester architect William M. Butterfield. [126]
The Tabard Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 The Tabard.JPG 1932 The Eta-Eta Chapter of Sigma Chi fraternity, a descendant of a Chandler School society, built this house to replace a previous burned structure. The fraternity adopted the name The Tabard, a reference to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, on April 20, 1960, and became coeducational in the 1970s. [127]
Theta Delta Chi Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Theta Delta 01.JPG 1925 This house stands on land used by Eleazar Wheelock for a garden. It was constructed in 1924 to replace the fraternity's earlier house on this site after it burned. [128]
Zeta Psi Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Zeta Psi.JPG 1925 Zeta Psi began in 1853 but lapsed during the 1860s and late 19th century. It lost College recognition in 2001 but regained recognition in 2009. [129]

Graduate school facilities[edit]

Geisel School of Medicine[edit]

The buildings of the Geisel School of Medicine are clustered on the north end of the Dartmouth campus,[130] known as the "north campus."[131]

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
1 Rope Ferry Road Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 1 Rope Ferry Road.JPG 1937 1 Rope Ferry Road, originally called the Hitchcock Clinic, was renamed after the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center moved from Hanover to the neighboring city of Lebanon. It now houses administrative offices of the Medical School, including the Dean's Office. [132][133]
3 Rope Ferry Road Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 3 Rope Ferry Road.JPG 1893 Formerly the Women's Ward of the Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, 3 Rope Ferry Road now serves as the Medical School's Admissions department. [134][135]
Dana Biomedical Library Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Dana Biomedical Library.JPG 1963–1964 Dana Biomedical Library, built with a grant from the Charles A. Dana Foundation, currently houses 240,000 volumes. [136]
Kellogg Auditorium Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Kellogg Auditorium.JPG 1962 Kellogg Auditorium is a Medical School meeting forum connected to Remsen by a skybridge. [137][138]
Remsen Medical Sciences Building Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Remsen Hall.JPG 1959–1960 Remsen, along with Vail, is one of the two main buildings of the Medical School campus, housing offices, labs, and classrooms. [139]
James D. Vail Medical Sciences Building Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Dartmouth Medical School 01.JPG 1971–1973 Vail is an eight-story building which, along with Remsen, houses the Medical School's offices, labs, and classrooms. [140]

Thayer School of Engineering[edit]

The Thayer School of Engineering is located adjacent to the Tuck School of Business on the western edge of campus, near the Connecticut River. It currently comprises two buildings, and it shares the Murdough Center (listed under Tuck) with the Tuck School of Business.

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
Horace Cummings Memorial Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Horace Cummings Memorial Hall.JPG 1939 This $200,000 building was built as the main facility of the Thayer School, with additional wings added in 1945-1947 and 1976. [141]
MacLean Engineering Sciences Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Thayer School of Engineering 04.JPG 2004–2006 Completed at a cost of just under $21 million, MacLean provides both research and teaching space for the Thayer School. [142]

Tuck School of Business[edit]

Like the Thayer School of Engineering, the Tuck School of Business is located in a complex on the western side of campus, along the Connecticut River.

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
Buchanan Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Buchannan Hall.JPG 1968 Originally called the "Tuck Mall Dorm," Buchanan is a Tuck dormitory. It contains 68 singles and five suites. [143]
Byrne Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Byrne Hall.JPG 1992 Byrne Hall contains classrooms, study/interview rooms, and a dining facility operated by Dartmouth Dining Services with seating in the PepsiCo Dining Room. [144][145]
Chase Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Chase House.JPG 1930 Named for College alumnus Salmon P. Chase, Chase was originally built as a dormitory. Now, it contains the Tuck School's admissions and financial aid offices, as well as some faculty offices. [146][147]
Murdough Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Murdough Center.JPG 1973 The Murdough Center is shared by the Tuck School and the Thayer School. In addition to lecture halls and some offices, the Center houses the Feldberg Business and Engineering Library. [148][149]
Stell Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Stell Hall.JPG 1930 Stell was originally a refectory, but upon the completion of Byrne Hall in the early 1990s, it was converted to a common space for students, faculty and staff with an events hall on the first floor and a mailroom and office services area below that. [150][151]
Tuck Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Tuck School of Business.JPG 1930 Tuck Hall serves as the main administrative building of the Tuck School. [152][153]
Achtmeyer, Pineau-Valencienne, and Raether Halls Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Tuck LLC.JPG 2007-2008 Tuck's newest residence halls include residential rooms, study and conference rooms, a library, common kitchens, laundry room, and lounges. It also includes classrooms and a large common space, the McLaughlin Atrium in Raether Hall, with fireplace, sofas, and ample room to relax or study. A balcony, open in warmer months, has deck chairs, tables, and a view of the Connecticut River. [154][155]
Whittemore Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Whittemore Hall.JPG 1999–2000 Whittemore Hall is a dormitory for Tuck students, housing 60 first-year students. [156][157]
Woodbury Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Woodbury House.JPG 1930 Woodbury Hall, originally built as a dormitory, was converted to office space in the late 1980s. It contains Tuck's five research centers. [147][158]

Athletic and outdoor recreation buildings[edit]

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
Alumni Gymnasium Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Alumni Gymnasium 01.JPG 1909–1910 Alumni Gymnasium serves as the center of Dartmouth's athletic facilities and includes two pools, a fitness center, a weight room, and an indoor track. It has undergone numerous remodelings, most recently in 2006. [159]
Berry Sports Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Berry Sports Center.JPG 1987 The Berry Sports Center holds racquetball and basketball facilities (Edward Leede Arena). [160]
Boss Tennis Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Boss Tennis Center.JPG 2000 The Alexis Boss Tennis Center, located behind Thompson Arena, contains six regulation tennis courts. The attached Alan Gordon Pavilion provides locker rooms and a lounge. [161]
Davis Field House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Davis Varsity House.JPG 1926 Davis Field House, which overlooks the Memorial Field track, is a facility for varsity athletic teams. [162]
Floren Varsity House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Floren Varsity House.JPG 2006–2007 Floren, which opened in the fall of 2007, contains a strength training center, a sports classroom, meeting rooms, locker rooms, equipment storage, and team offices. [163]
Friends of Dartmouth Rowing Boathouse Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Friends of Dartmouth Rowing Boathouse.JPG 1998–1999 The Boathouse, sitting on the banks of the Connecticut River north of the Ledyard Bridge, can store 30 rowing shells. [164]
Ledyard Canoe Club Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Ledyard Canoe Club.JPG 1920 The building housing the Club sits along the Connecticut River and includes storage space for canoes, as well as a meeting room and kitchen. [165]
Leverone Field House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Leverone Field House.JPG 1962–1963 Designed by Italian architect Pier Luigi Nervi, Leverone contains an indoor track and tennis courts. [166]
Memorial Field Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Memorial Field 02.JPG 1921–1923 Memorial Field, Dartmouth's football and track & field stadium, was erected on the site of previous athletic grandstand built in 1893. It is named in memory of the Dartmouth alumni who died in World War I. [167]
Thompson Arena Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Thompson Arena.JPG 1975 Thompson Arena, Dartmouth's hockey facility, was also designed by Pier Luigi Nervi. [168]
Tom Dent Cabin Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Tom Dent Cabin.JPG 1940 Tom Dent Cabin is a recreational cabin standing along the Connecticut River near the Ledyard Canoe Club. [169]

Other facilities[edit]

Building Image Constructed Notes Reference
5 Rope Ferry Road Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 5 Rope Ferry Road.JPG 1913 5 Rope Ferry Road contained the maternity ward of the Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. It is now home to the Department of Safety & Security, Dartmouth's campus police force. [170][171]
13 East Wheelock Street Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 13 East Wheelock Street 01.JPG 18XX 13 East Wheelock Street was bought by the College at some point between 1950 and 1961. Since around 1997, it has been used as housing for faculty associated with the East Wheelock cluster. [172]
37 Dewey Field Road Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 37 Dewey Field Road.JPG 1936–1937 37 Dewey Field Road was built as part of the MHMH School of Nursing. It now contains the IT department and technical support. [173][174]
Aquinas House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Aquinas House 1.JPG
Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Aquinas House 2.JPG
1961–1962 Aquinas House is the independent Catholic Students' Center, located at the end of Webster Avenue. [175]
Bartlett Tower Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Bartlett Tower.JPG 1885–1895 Bartlett Tower is a 71-foot (22 m) prospect tower located on a hill in the northeast corner of campus. It was erected by Dartmouth students over the course of ten years. [176]
Blunt Alumni Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Blunt Alumni Center 02.JPG 1810 ca. The oldest part of the Blunt Alumni Center was a house built by Professor Zephaniah Swift Moore. It was bought by the College in 1884 and served as a dormitory called the Crosby House from 1896 until 1949, when the Alumni Records department moved in. Several additions have been added to the original house. Crosby House, the original structure built by Moore, is the oldest house in Hanover that remains on its original foundation. The Blunt Alumni Center also houses the Rassias Foundation. [177]
Choate House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Choate House.JPG 1786 Choate House, originally standing near today's Webster Hall, was inhabited by a number of College professors and private owners before being sold to the College in 1910. It was modernized and moved several times, finally to its current location on North Main Street. It briefly housed part of the Mathematics Department. [178]
Collis Center Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Collis Center 03.JPG 1901–1902 The Collis Center was constructed on the site of the burned Balch House, of which only the granite steps out front remain. Originally called "College Hall," it was expanded in 1993 to its current form. It serves as a student center and contains a café. [179]
Dartmouth Outing Club House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Dartmouth Outing Club House.JPG 1928 Standing on the north end of Occom Pond, the Dartmouth Outing Club House is the DOC's Cross Country Ski Center and equipment rental location. [180]
Dean of the College House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Dean of College House.JPG 1917 or later This house, standing at 9 Choate Road, houses the current Dean of the College. It was formerly privately owned, and once held Aquinas House's functions. [181]
Dick's House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Dick's House.JPG 1927 Officially "Dick Hall's House," it is the College infirmary. [182]
Edgerton House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Edgerton House.JPG 1960 Edgerton House is the Episcopal students' center. [183]
Fairbanks Hall North Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-05 Fairbanks North.JPG 1925 Fairbanks North originally held the Clark School gymnasium and stood on North Main Street before being moved to its current location and being adjoined to Fairbanks South. [184]
Fairbanks Hall South Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-05 Fairbanks South.JPG 1903–1904 Fairbanks South was built as the home of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. It is currently used by the William Jewett Tucker Foundation for Community Service. [185]
Hallgarten Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Hallgarten Hall.JPG 1873–1874 Hallgarten Hall was a dormitory for the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. It was purchased by Dartmouth in 1892 and served as a dorm until 1919, when it was used as an infirmary. It now holds the Bregman Electronic Music Studio. [186]
Hanover Inn Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Hanover Inn 01.JPG 1887 The Hanover Inn is a College-owned hotel overlooking the College Green. [187]
Hood Museum of Art Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Hood Museum of Art.JPG 1981–1983 The museum was previously housed in Carpenter, but it outgrew that space in the 1950s. The current 37,000-square-foot (3,400 m2) Hood Museum was funded by Trustee Harvey Hood in 1978. [188]
McKenzie Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 McKenzie.JPG 1931 ca. McKenzie Hall is the home of Dartmouth's Facilities Operations & Management (FO&M) Department. It was originally constructed as a milk pasteurization plant. [189]
Montgomery House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Montgomery House.JPG 1925 Montgomery House along Rope Ferry Road houses visiting Montgomery Fellows. [190]
Parker House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Parker House.JPG 1917 Parker House in the ravine behind College Street currently houses various College offices. [191]
President's House Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 President's House.JPG 1926 The President's House stands on Webster Avenue along with twelve of Dartmouth's fraternities and sororities. [192]
Robinson Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Robinson Hall.JPG 1913–1914 Robinson Hall is the home of a variety of student organizations, including The Dartmouth, the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, the Dartmouth Outing Club, and Dartmouth Broadcasting. [193]
Rollins Chapel Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-03 Rollins Chapel (edit 1).JPG 1884–1885 Rollins Chapel is Dartmouth's nondenominational chapel. [194]
Roth Center for Jewish Life Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Roth Center for Jewish Life.JPG 1996–1997 The Roth Center is a center for the Jewish community of Dartmouth and the surrounding area. [195]
Thayer Dining Hall Dartmouth College campus 2007-06-23 Thayer Dining Hall 02.JPG 1937 Thayer Dining Hall is the center of student meal service, containing five dining operations. [196]
Webster Cottage Dartmouth College campus 2007-10-02 Webster Cottage.JPG 1780 Webster Cottage was, according to oral tradition, the home of student Daniel Webster during his senior year at Dartmouth. It passed through a variety of private hands, and now houses the Hanover Historical Society. [197]

Planned buildings[edit]

Building Scheduled Notes Reference
Class of 1953 Commons 2010–2011 The remodeling of Thayer Dining Hall. [198]
Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center 2009–2012 The new Life Sciences Building in the North Campus by the Dartmouth Medical School will replace Gilman Life Sciences Building. It will cost $93 million, and will be built on the land which now contains Strasenburgh, the Modular Laboratory, and Butler Hall. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson are the architects. [199]
Visual Arts Center 2010–2011 This new building for the Departments of Studio Art and Film & Television Studies will face Lebanon Street and replace Brewster and Clement Halls. Machado and Silvetti are the architects. [200][201]

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External links[edit]