List of English Latinates of Germanic origin

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Many words in the English lexicon are made up of Latinate words; that is, words which have entered the English language from a Romance language (usually Anglo-Norman), or were borrowed directly from Latin. Quite a few of these words can further trace their origins back to a Germanic source (usually Frankish[1]), making them cognate with many native English words from Old English, yielding etymological twins. Many of these are Franco-German words, or French words of Germanic origin.[2]

Below is a list of Germanic words, names and affixes which have come into English via Latin or a Romance language.

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

F[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

N[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

U[edit]

V[edit]

W[edit]

X[edit]

Y[edit]

Z[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Skeat, Principles of English etymology, pg. 244
  2. ^ Wes Ulm, The Germanic Component of Old and Middle French: Frankish, Gothic, Burgundian and Their Contributions to the English Tongue, http://wesulm.bravehost.com/languages/english/franco_german.htm
  • Online Etymology Dictionary. [1]
  • Auguste Brachet, An Etymological Dictionary of the French Language: Third Edition
  • Centre National de Ressources Textuelles et Lexicales [2]
  • Dictionary.com. [3]
  • Diez, An Etymological Dictionary of the Romance Languages"

See also[edit]