List of Etruscan names for Greek heroes

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This article is a list of Etruscan names for Greek heroes. It is a partial list of the names given under List of Etruscan mythological figures, with the Greek name placed first.

Achilles
Achle, Achile. Legendary hero of the Trojan War.[1]
Agamemnon
Achmemrun. Legendary king of Mycenaean Greece.[1]
Ajax, son of Telamon and Ajax, son of Oileus
Aivas Tlamunus, Aivas Vilates; also Eivas or Evas.[2]
Amycus
Amuce, Amuche, Amuke. The Greek legendary figure of the Argonauts myth.[3]
Atlas 
Aril.[3]
Actaeon
Ataiun.[3]
Admetus
Atmite.[4]
Adonis
Atunis.[4]
Kallinikos
Calanice. Greek name of Hercle.[4]
Capaneus
Capne, Kapne.[4]
Castor
Castur.[4]
Jason
Easun, Heasun, Heiasun.
Asklepios
Esplace. Legendary healer,[5]
Aitolos
Etule. Confused with his brother, Epeios, who built the Trojan horse.[5]
Eteocles
Evtucle, [Ev]thucle.[5]
Amphiaraus
Hamphiare, Amphare. Legendary seer.[6]
Hercle, Hercele, Herecele, Herkle, Hrcle
Etruscan form of the legendary hero known to the Greeks as Hēraklēs and the Romans as Hercules.[6]
Lynceus
Lunc, Lnche.[7]
Meleager
Meleacr.[8]
Menelaus
Menle. The hero of Trojan War fame.[8]
Nestor
Nestur.[9]
Palamedes
Palmithe, Talmithe.[9]
Patroclus
Patrucle.[9]
Peleus
Pele.[9]
Perseus
Perse, Pherse.[10]
Phaon
Phaun, Faun, Phamu.[10]
Phoinix
Phuinis. The friend of Peleus.[10]
Prometheus
Prumathe.[11]
Pollux
Pultuce, Pulutuce, Pulutuke, Pultuke. One of the mythological twins.[11]
Sisyphus
Sispe, Sisphe. The legendary king.[12]
Daedalus
Taitle.[13]
Teucer 
Techrs. The Trojan War hero.[13]
Telamon
Telmun, Tlamun, Talmun, Tlamu. A legendary Argonaut.[13]
Tiresias
Teriasals, Teriasa. Legendary blind prophet.[13]
Theseus
These.
Dioscuri
Tinas cliniar, "sons of Tina", designating the twins.[14]
Tyndareus
Tuntle.[15]
Tydeus
Tute.[15]
Orpheus
Urphe.[1]
Orestes
Urusthe. The homeric legendary character.[1]
Odysseus
Uthste
Elpenor 
Velparun.[16]
Icarus
Vikare. Son of Taitle.[17]
Iolaos
Vile, Vilae. Nephew of Hercle.[16]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d The Bonfantes (2002), page 192.
  2. ^ The Bonfantes (2002), page 193.
  3. ^ a b c The Bonfantes (2002), page 194.
  4. ^ a b c d e The Bonfantes (2002), page 195.
  5. ^ a b c The Bonfantes (2002), page 198.
  6. ^ a b The Bonfantes (2002) page 199.
  7. ^ The Bonfantes (2002), page 200.
  8. ^ a b The Bonfantes (2002), page 201.
  9. ^ a b c d The Bonfantes (2002), page 202.
  10. ^ a b c The Bonfantes (2002), page 203.
  11. ^ a b The Bonfantes (2002) page 204.
  12. ^ The Bonfantes (2002), page 205.
  13. ^ a b c d The Bonfantes (2002), page 206.
  14. ^ Swaddling and Bonafante (2006) page 78.
  15. ^ a b The Bonfantes (2002), page 208.
  16. ^ a b The Bonfantes (2002), page 210.
  17. ^ Swaddling & Bonfante page 42.

References[edit]

  • Bonfante, Giuliano; Bonfante, Larissa (2002). The Etruscan Language: an Introduction. Manchester: University of Manchester Press. ISBN 0-7190-5540-7.  Preview available on Google Books.
  • De Grummond, Nancy Thomson (2006). Etruscan Mythology, Sacred History and Legend: An Introduction. University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology. ISBN 1-931707-86-3.  Preview available on Google Books.
  • Dennis, George (1848). The Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria. London: John Murray.  Available in the Gazeteer of Bill Thayer's Website at [1]
  • Leland, Charles Godfrey (1892). Etruscan Roman Remains in Popular Tradition. London: T. Fisher Unwin.  Downloadable Google Books, online at [2].
  • Pallottino, M. (1975). The Etruscans. London: Penguin Books. 
  • Richardson, Emeline Hill (1964, 1976). The Etruscans: Their Art and Civilization. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-71234-6. 
  • Swaddling, Judith, and Bonfante, Larissa (2006). Etruscan Myths. University of Texas Press. ISBN 0-292-70606-5.  Preview Google Books.
  • Thulin, Carl (1906). Die Götter des Martianus Capella und der Bronzeleber von Piacenza. Alfred Töpelmann.  A German-language book, downloadable from Google Books.