List of FIFA Club World Cup finals

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List of FIFA Club World Cup finals
Founded 2000
Region International (FIFA)
Number of teams 7 (total)
2 (finalists)
Current champions Germany Bayern Munich (1st title)
Most successful club(s) Spain Barcelona
Brazil Corinthians
(2 titles each)

The FIFA Club World Cup is an international association football competition organised by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body.[1] The championship was first contested as the FIFA Club World Championship in 2000.[2] It was not held between 2001 and 2004 due to a combination of factors, most importantly the collapse of FIFA's marketing partner International Sport and Leisure.[3] Following a change in format which saw the FIFA Club World Championship absorb the Toyota Cup, it was relaunched in 2005 and took its current name the season afterwards.[4]

The current format of the tournament involves seven teams competing for the title at venues within the host nation over a period of about two weeks; the winners of that year's edition of the Asian AFC Champions League, African CAF Champions League, North American CONCACAF Champions League, South American Copa Libertadores, Oceanian OFC Champions League and European UEFA Champions League, along with the host nation's national champion, participate in a straight knockout tournament.[1]

Corinthians and Barcelona hold the record for most victories, with each club winning the competition twice since its inception. Teams from Brazil have won the tournament the most times, with four winners produced from the nation. The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) is the most successful confederation of the competition with six titles earned by five of its clubs. The current champions are Bayern Munich, who won their first title, following a 2–0 win against Raja Casablanca in the 2013 FIFA Club World Cup Final at the Stade de Marrakech in Marrakesh, Morocco.[5]

History[edit]

Manchester United see this as an opportunity to compete for the ultimate honour of being the very first world club champions.

Martin Edwards, Manchester United's chairman, 1980–2002, commenting on the FIFA Club World Championship; British Broadcasting Corporation News, June 30, 1999.[6]
An aerial view of the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro.
Estádio do Maracanã, the location of the first Club World Cup final in 2000 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

There they were claiming that the English weren't interested in the world championship, yet the BBC sent 60 people to cover the tournament. This shows that it was the most important competition that they have taken part in in their history. They came here thinking they were going to win easily but they didn't count on the strength of Vasco. No Manchester player would get a place in the Vasco team at the moment. The Brazilians are the best players in the world, the Europeans do not even come close.

Eurico Miranda, Vasco da Gama's vice-president, 1986–2000, commenting on the importance given to the tournament by the British news media, the level of European club football as well as Brazil's after his side's 3-1 win over Manchester United; Independent Online, January 11, 2000.[7]

The first final of the competition was an all-Brazilian affair, as well as the only one which saw one side have home advantage.[8]Vasco da Gama could not take advantage of its local support, being beaten by Corinthians 4–3 on penalties after a 0–0 draw in extra time.[9] The second edition of the competition was planned for Spain in 2001, and it was supposed to feature 12 clubs.[10] However, it was canceled on May 18, due to a combination of factors, most importantly the collapse of FIFA's marketing partner International Sport and Leisure.[3] FIFA agreed with Toyota to merge the Toyota Cup and Club World Championship into one event.[4]

The 2005 edition saw São Paulo pushed to the limit by Saudi side Al-Ittihad to reach the final.[11] In the final, one goal from Mineiro was enough to dispatch English club Liverpool; Mineiro became the first player to score in a Club World Cup final.[12] Internacional defeated defending World and South American champions São Paulo in the 2006 Copa Libertadores finals in order to qualify for the 2006 tournament.[13] At the semifinals, Internacional beat Egyptian side Al-Ahly in order to meet Barcelona in the final.[14] One late goal from Adriano Gabiru allowed the trophy to be kept in Brazil once again.[15]

It was in 2007 when Brazilian hegemony was finally broken: AC Milan disputed a close match against Japan's Urawa Red Diamonds, who were pushed by over 67,000 fans at Yokohama's International Stadium, and won 1–0 to reach the final.[16] In the final, Milan defeated Boca Juniors 4–2, in a match that saw the first player sent off in a Club World Cup final: Milan's Kakha Kaladze from Georgia at the 77th minute. Eleven minutes later, Boca Juniors' Pablo Ledesma would join Kaladze as he too was sent off.[17] The following year, Manchester United would emulate Milan by beating their semifinal opponents, Japan's Gamba Osaka, 5–3.[18] They saw off Ecuadorian club LDU Quito 1-0 to become world champions in 2008.[19]

Barcelona dethroned World and European champions Manchester United in the 2009 UEFA Champions League final to qualify for the 2009 edition of the Club World Cup.[20] Barcelone beat Mexican club Atlante in the semifinals 3–1 and met Estudiantes in the final.[21] After a very close encounter which saw the need for extra-time, Lionel Messi scored from a header to snatch victory for Barcelona and complete an unprecedented sextuple.[22][23][24][25] The 2010 edition saw the first non-European and non-South American side to reach the final: Congo's Mazembe defeated Brazil's Internacional 2–0 in the semifinal to face Internazionale, who beat South Korean club Seongnam Ilhwa Chunma 3–0 to reach that instance.[26][27] Internazionale would go on to beat Mazembe with the same scoreline to complete their quintuple.[28]

In 2011, Barcelona would once again show its class after winning their semifinal match 4–0 against Qatari club Al-Sadd.[29] In the final, Barcelona would repeat its performance against Santos; this is, to date, the largest winning margin by any victor of the competition.[30] The 2012 edition saw Europe's dominance come to an end as Corinthians traveled to Japan to join Barcelona in being two-time winners of the competition.[31] In the semifinals, Al-Ahly managed to keep the scoreline close as Corinthians' Paolo Guerrero scored to send the Timão into their second final.[32] Guerrero would once again come through for Corinthians as the Timão saw off English side Chelsea 1–0 in order to bring the trophy back to Brazil.[33]

List of finals[edit]

The International Stadium Yokohama in Japan has played host to the FIFA Club World Cup final the most times with six title-deciding matches held.[34] Along with the Estádio do Maracanã, they are the only venues in the world to have hosted both the FIFA World Cup final and the FIFA Club World Cup final (International Stadium Yokohama hosted the 2002 FIFA World Cup Final while the deciding match of the 1950 FIFA World Cup was disputed at the Maracanã).[34][35] The 2000 FIFA Club World Championship final remains the highest attended final of the competition with 73,000 fans watching the all-Brazilian final.[8] The final was also the only one which saw two clubs from the same nation dispute it.[8] The 2013 final had the least amount of spectators turn up with 37,774.

The 2007 final holds the record for most goals scored in a Club World Cup Final with six goals scored by five players, while the 2000 final remains the only scoreless decider.[17][8] The 2011 final became the most lopsided match of the competition with the triumphant team winning with a difference of four goals.[36]

Key to the FIFA Club World Cup finals table
dagger Match was won during extra time double-dagger Match was won on a penalty shoot-out
Finals
Season Country Club Score Club Country Final venue Host nation Attendance Refs
Winner Runner-up
2000  Brazil Corinthians   0–0Match was won on a penalty shoot-out [n 1] Vasco da Gama  Brazil Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro  Brazil 73,000 [8][37][5]
2005  Brazil São Paulo 1–0 Liverpool  England International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama  Japan 66,821 [38][12][39]
2006  Brazil Internacional 1–0 Barcelona  Spain International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama  Japan 67,128 [40][15][41]
2007  Italy Milan 4–2 Boca Juniors  Argentina International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama  Japan 68,263 [42][17][43]
2008  England Manchester United 1–0 LDU Quito  Ecuador International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama  Japan 68,682 [44][19][45]
2009  Spain Barcelona   2–1Match was won during extra time [n 2] Estudiantes  Argentina Zayed Sports City Stadium, Abu Dhabi  United Arab Emirates 43,050 [46][47][48]
2010  Italy Internazionale 3–0 TP Mazembe Democratic Republic of the Congo DR Congo Zayed Sports City Stadium, Abu Dhabi  United Arab Emirates 42,174 [49][28][50]
2011  Spain Barcelona 4–0 Santos  Brazil International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama  Japan 68,166 [46][30][51]
2012  Brazil Corinthians 1–0 Chelsea  England International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama  Japan 68,275 [37][33][52]
2013  Germany Bayern Munich 2–0 Raja Casablanca  Morocco Stade de Marrakech, Marrakesh  Morocco 37,774 [53][54]
Footnotes
  1. ^ Score was 0–0 after 120 minutes. Corinthians won 4–3 on penalties.[8]
  2. ^ Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes.[22]

Results by club[edit]

A group of association football players, who played for FC Barcelona at the time of the photo, lifting their coach after winning their second FIFA Club World Cup.
Pep Guardiola is hoisted by his players after Barcelona won the 2011 FIFA Club World Cup. Barcelona, along with Corinthians, are the most successful clubs of the competition with two triumphant campaigns each.
The Corinthians team is seen posing for a picture after winning the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup.
The Corinthians squad of 2012 celebrating after winning the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup. Corinthians is the only club to have flawless appearances in the final, winning the 2000 and 2012 editions. The Timão is also the only world champion that qualified to the Club World Cup by merit of being the host nation's national champion.
An association football team being congratulated by delegates from São Paulo.
São Paulo FC's players are congratulated by the Brazilian president Lula after winning the 2005 FIFA Club World Championship at the Federação Paulista de Futebol (FPF). Brazil is the strongest national league of the competition with four titles to its name. It has also provided the most finalists with six in total. The 2000 decider, an all-Brazilian affair, remains the only final contested between two clubs from the same nation.
UEFA's headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.
The headquarters of the Union of European Football Associations, or UEFA, in Nyon, Switzerland. UEFA is the most successful confederation of the competition with five titles won between four clubs.

Corinthians and Barcelona share the record number of victories in the competition with two triumphs each.[37][46] Corinthians remain the only club World Champion to have qualified to the competition by being the host nation's national champion while Barcelona hold the record for the most final appearances with three.[37][46] TP Mazembe and Raja Casablanca are the only non-European and non-South American clubs ever to reach the final, with those feats being accomplished during the 2010 and 2013 editions, respectively.[26]

Performance by club
Nation Club Won Runner-up Years won Years runner-up
Spain Barcelona 2 1 2009, 2011 2006
Brazil Corinthians 2 0 2000, 2012 &
Brazil São Paulo 1 0 2005 &
Brazil Internacional 1 0 2006 &
Italy Milan 1 0 2007 &
England Manchester United 1 0 2008 &
Italy Internazionale 1 0 2010 &
Germany Bayern Munich 1 0 2013 &
Brazil Vasco da Gama 0 1 &
2000
England Liverpool 0 1 &
2005
Argentina Boca Juniors 0 1 &
2007
Ecuador LDU Quito 0 1 &
2008
Argentina Estudiantes 0 1 &
2009
Democratic Republic of the Congo TP Mazembe 0 1 &
2010
Brazil Santos 0 1 &
2011
England Chelsea 0 1 &
2012
Morocco Raja Casablanca 0 1 &
2013

Results by nation[edit]

Brazil's Brasileirão has proven to be the most successful national league of the competition with four titles won in 2000, 2005, 2006 and 2012.[8][12][15] Italy's Serie A and Spain's La Liga are second with two titles each in 2007 and 2010 for the former and 2009 and 2011 for the latter.[17][22][28][30] Serie A and Germany's Bundesliga remain the only undefeated national leagues which has had representatives carry the world title.[17][28] Argentina's Primera División carries the dubious record of losing the most finals, without ever winning the world title, with two defeats in 2007 and 2009.[17][22]

Performance by nation
Nation Finalists Winners Runners-up
 Brazil 6 4 2
 Spain 3 2 1
 Italy 2 2 0
 England 3 1 2
 Germany 1 1 0
 Argentina 2 0 2
 Ecuador 1 0 1
Democratic Republic of the Congo DR Congo 1 0 1
 Morocco 1 0 1

Results by confederation[edit]

UEFA has the most wins in the competition with six titles in total. The Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol, or CONMEBOL, has had the most finalists with nine total appearances. The Confédération Africaine de Football, also known as CAF, is the only confederation, apart from UEFA and CONMEBOL, to have had a representative reach the deciding match.[28]

Performance by confederation
Confederation Appearances Winners Runners-up
UEFA 9 6 3
CONMEBOL 9 4 5
CAF 2 0 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "FIFA Club World Cup Japan 2012 – Regulations" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved March 11, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Brazil 2000 Final Draw". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. October 14, 1999. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "FIFA decides to postpone 2001 Club World Championship to 2003". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. May 18, 2001. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Toyota confirmed as FIFA Club World Championship 2005 naming partner". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. March 15, 2005. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b de Arruda, Marcelo Leme (January 10, 2013). "FIFA Club World Championship". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  6. ^ "United pull out of FA Cup". British Broadcasting Corporation. June 30, 1999. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Reds in Rio to drink, taunts Gerson". Independent Online. January 11, 2000. Retrieved March 13, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "Corinthians – Vasco da Gama". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. January 14, 2000. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Corinthians crowned world champions". British Broadcasting Corporation News. January 15, 2000. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
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  12. ^ a b c "Sao Paulo FC – Liverpool FC". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. December 18, 2005. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
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External links[edit]