List of Final Fantasy compilation albums

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Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi and owned by Square Enix that includes video games, motion pictures, and other merchandise. There have been a number of compilation albums of Final Fantasy music produced by Square Enix, as well as several albums produced by outside groups, both officially and unofficially licensed. These albums include music directly from the games, as well as arrangements covering a variety of styles, such as orchestral, piano, vocal, and techno.

Square Enix produced the first album, Final Fantasy 1987–1994, in 1994. Since then, Square Enix has produced thirteen albums, leading up to Final Fantasy Remix in 2008. The first compilation album produced by an outside group was The Best of Final Fantasy 1994–1999: A Musical Tribute, released in 2000 by Sherman F. Heinig; the newest is Voices of the Lifestream, a download-only album from OverClocked ReMix released in 2007.

Albums[edit]

For compilation albums from video games across multiple series produced by Square Enix, including the Final Fantasy series, see List of Square Enix compilation albums.

Final Fantasy 1987–1994[edit]

Final Fantasy 1987–1994
Greatest hits album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released November 26, 1994 (limited edition)
December 10, 1994
October 23, 2001 (N Generation)
October 1, 2004 (re-release)
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 63:10
Label NTT Publishing
Tokyopop (N Generation)
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Final Fantasy 1987–1994 is a greatest hits album of music from Final Fantasy I through VI. The album contains music from the soundtracks of the games, as well as unreleased tracks and four vocal selections that were arranged, remixed and performed by Nobuo Uematsu, Shirō Hamaguchi and others. The album was released by NTT Publishing on December 10, 1994, with a limited edition previously released on November 26, 1994, and was re-released on October 1, 2004. The limited edition release bears the catalog number PSCN-9101, the normal edition release bears the catalog number PSCN-5011, and the re-release bears the catalog number NTCP-5011. The album contains 16 tracks and spans 63:10.[1] The album was released in North America as Final Fantasy N Generation: Official Best Collection on October 10, 2001 by Tokyopop with the catalog number TPCD 0212-2. This version had slightly different track names and packaging than Final Fantasy 1987–1994.[2]

The compilation was well received by critics. Freddie W. of RPGFan found the track selection for Final Fantasy 1987–1994 to be "pretty good" and termed it a "great collection".[1] Lucy Rzeminski of RPGFan agreed, finding the album to be a "nice collection of arrangements".[2] Adam Corn of Soundtrack Central also enjoyed the album, saying that there were "few CDs I would recommend more highly" and that the tracks were "rife with emotion and beauty".[3]


Final Fantasy: Pray[edit]

Final Fantasy: Pray
Compilation album by Risa Ohki
Released June 25, 1994
October 1, 2004 (re-release)
Recorded Baybridge Studio, Pale Green Studio, Sound Inn, Zero Studio, and Arc Garret
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 47:02
Label NTT Publishing
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Final Fantasy: Pray is an arranged album of music from the first six games in the series composed by Nobuo Uematsu and arranged for vocals by Toshiro Mitsutomi, Masatsugu Shinozaki and Yoshiro Nakamura and sung by Risa Ohki. The tracks were sung in many languages, including English, French, Japanese, and Portuguese. The album covers a duration of 47:02, and was released on June 25, 1994 by NTT Publishing, and subsequently re-released on October 1, 2004. The original release bears the catalog number PSCN-5006, while the re-release bears the catalog number NTCP-5006.[4]

Final Fantasy: Pray was well received by reviewers such as Patrick Gann of RPGFan, who found the album to be "one of the most original" albums produced for the Final Fantasy series and described it as "simply incredible". He did, however, take issue with some of the lyrics, finding that when translated into English they made little sense.[4] Kevin Murphy of Soundtrack Central agreed, finding the arrangements to be "great".[5] Dan of Square Enix Music Online also enjoyed the album, although he found the lyrics to be "nothing too special".[6]


F.F. Mix[edit]

F.F. Mix
Compilation album by various
Released November 26, 1994
October 1, 2004 (re-release)
Recorded Sunrise Studio, Snow Production Studios
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 58:10
Label NTT Publishing

F.F. Mix is an album of music from Final Fantasy IV, V, and VI, composed by Nobuo Uematsu and remixed by several artists, including Snow Productions, "The Murderers of Cross Over", Phat Stylee, and Los Mambo Panchos. It was first released on November 26, 1994, and subsequently re-released on October 1, 2004, by NTT Publishing. The album includes songs from the previously released singles Final Fantasy IV Minimum Album, Final Fantasy V: 5+1, and Final Fantasy V Mambo de Chocobo, as well as three original techno-style arrangements. The album covers a duration of 58:10, and the original release bears the catalog number PSCN-5012 while the re-release bears the catalog number NTCP-5012.[7]

The album received mixed reviews by critics. Patrick Gann of RPGFan disliked the new tracks and found many of the others lacking, though he felt the album as a whole was "great for hardcore fans".[7] Soundtrack Central was "a little disappointed" in the album, but felt it was still a "nice" CD.[8] Simon of Square Enix Music Online, however, disliked the collection, feeling that it was a "bizarre" album and only "for hardcore fans".[9]


Final Fantasy: Love Will Grow[edit]

Final Fantasy: Love Will Grow
Compilation album by Risa Ohki and Ikuko Noguchi
Released November 25, 1995
October 1, 2004 (re-release)
Recorded Sunrise Studio
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 42:48
Label NTT Publishing
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Final Fantasy: Love Will Grow is an album of music from the first six Final Fantasy games arranged for vocals and performed by Nobuo Uematsu, and sung by Risa Ohki and Ikuko Noguchi in various languages, including English, Japanese, French, and Portuguese. It covers a duration of 42:48 and was released by NTT Publishing on November 25, 1995, and was subsequently re-released on October 1, 2004. The original release bears the catalog number PSCN-5041, and the re-release bears the catalog number NTCP-5041.[10]

The album was well received by critics, with Patrick Gann of RPGFan proclaiming that he "really cannot express how good this soundtrack is" and that it was the "best vocal collection" he had heard to date.[10] Adam Corn of Soundtrack Central was also pleased with the CD, finding it to have "wonderful instrumentation" and the vocals to be "impeccable". He concluded that "what this CD lacks in intensity it makes up for in sheer beauty".[11] Dan of Square Enix Music Online, however, although stating that he enjoyed the album found several of the tracks to be "tedious" and preferred Final Fantasy: Pray to Love Will Grow.[6]


Music from FFV and FFVI Video Games[edit]

Music from FFV and FFVI Video Games
Compilation album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released October 5, 1999
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 57:27
Label Square

Music from FFV and FFVI Video Games is a promotional CD which was included with the release of the Final Fantasy Anthology collection in North America. The album, which was never released as a stand-alone product, contains nine songs from Final Fantasy V followed by thirteen songs from Final Fantasy VI. This release marked the first time that Final Fantasy V had been released outside of Japan. The songs on the album are identical to the versions from the games' respective original soundtracks. The Final Fantasy Anthology was released by Square on October 5, 1999, and the album did not have a catalog number. It spans 22 tracks and covers a duration of 57:27.[12]

The album was poorly received by critics such as Daniel K of Soundtrack Central, who derided the track selection and declared that the album was only acceptable because it came free with the game.[13] Chris of Square Enix Music Online also disliked the track selection for the album, terming it an "an unworthy 'best of' selection" and claiming that the album "offers nothing" to both casual listeners and Final Fantasy music fans.[14] Patrick Gann of RPGFan, however, said that while many of the best songs from the games were not included, the album was still "an enjoyable listening experience".[12]


The Best of Final Fantasy 1994–1999: A Musical Tribute[edit]

The Best of Final Fantasy 1994–1999: A Musical Tribute
Studio album by Sherman F. Heinig and Oceanlight Productions Cover =
Released September 26, 2000
October 9, 2001 (re-release)
Recorded Sherman Records
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 37:12
42:49 (re-release)
Label Big Ear Music
WB Music Corp (re-release)

The Best of Final Fantasy 1994–1999: A Musical Tribute is an arranged and remixed tribute album of music from Final Fantasy VI, VII, and VIII. The album contains a selection of musical tracks from the games, arranged and remixed by Sherman F. Heinig and performed by the Hollywood Symphony Orchestra and the Electric Sound Ensemble. Vocals were performed by Tamara Woodman in "Liberi Fatali". It was first released on September 26, 2000 by Big Ear Music, and subsequently re-released on October 9, 2001 as Music Inspired By Final Fantasy, containing an additional track, "Alexandria (Vivi's Theme)" from Final Fantasy IX, by WB Music Corp. "Alexandria" was performed by KFSS Studios. The original release bears the catalog number EAZ-4032, and the re-release bears the catalog number 40131-2.[15]

The album was poorly received by critics, with Daniel Space of RPGFan terming it a "disappointment" and criticizing the quality of the synthesized instruments and vocals.[15] Stahn Mahn of RPGFan was more approving, calling it "average", but also disliked the synthesized instruments and the quality of the remixing.[15] Chris Tilton of Soundtrack Central was more derogatory, saying that "if you can name any kind of harm you can do to music, it's on this CD" and was greatly disapproving of the quality of the synthesized instruments.[16]


Potion: Relaxin' with Final Fantasy[edit]

Potion: Relaxin' with Final Fantasy
Compilation album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released February 21, 2001
July 19, 2006 (re-release)
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 66:22
Label DigiCube
Square Enix (re-release)
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Potion: Relaxin' with Final Fantasy is an album of Final Fantasy music, containing a selection of musical tracks from previous arranged albums and one previously unreleased track. The tracks were all composed by Nobuo Uematsu, and the bonus track, "Shin'aie Naru Tomo e", was arranged by Yoko Shimomura and performed by Kazunori Seo. The album was released on February 21, 2001, by DigiCube with the catalog number SSCX-10051 and re-released by Square Enix on July 19, 2006 with the catalog number SQEX-10073. The album spans 17 tracks and covers a duration of 66:22.[17] The album reached No. 42 on the Japan Oricon charts and was well received by critics; Damian Thomas of RPGFan termed it "a solid buy" and found it to be a very relaxing album.[18][17]


Final Fantasy S Generation: Official Best Collection[edit]

Final Fantasy S Generation: Official Best Collection
Greatest hits album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released October 23, 2001
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 66:50
Label Tokyopop
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Final Fantasy S Generation: Official Best Collection is a greatest hits collection of arranged music from Final Fantasy VII, VIII, and IX. The album contains a selection of musical tracks from other albums, composed and arranged by Nobuo Uematsu. It was released on October 23, 2001 exclusively in North America by Tokyopop. The release bears the catalog number TPCD 0213-2, spans 16 tracks, and covers a duration of 66:50.[19] The album was well received by critics, with Lucy Rzeminski of RPGFan praising the track selection and saying that she had "no complaints about anything on this album".[19]


Potion 2: Relaxin' with Final Fantasy[edit]

Potion 2: Relaxin' with Final Fantasy
Compilation album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released December 19, 2001
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 61:23
Label DigiCube
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Potion 2: Relaxin' with Final Fantasy is an album of Final Fantasy music, containing a selection of musical tracks from previous arranged albums and one previously unreleased track, "Eyes on Me (Acoustic Guitar Version)". The tracks were all composed by Nobuo Uematsu. The album was released on December 19, 2001, by DigiCube with the catalog number SSCX-10059. It spans 14 tracks and covers a duration of 61:23.[20]

The album was well received by critics. Damian Thomas of RPGFan found it to be a "great compilation" and "highly" recommended the CD.[20] Philip of Square Enix Music Online, while not as exuberant as RPGFan, also enjoyed the album, finding that although some of the tracks "stretched the definition" of relaxing, the disk as a whole was engaging and solid.[21]


20020220 - Music from Final Fantasy[edit]

20020220 - Music from Final Fantasy
Live album by Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra
Released May 9, 2002
July 22, 2004 (re-release)
Recorded Tokyo International Forum
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length Disk 1: 54:04
Disk 2: 53:59
Label DigiCube
Square Enix (re-release)
Producer Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra

20020220 - Music from Final Fantasy is a live recording of an orchestral concert of arranged music from the Final Fantasy video game series. The album contains a selection of musical tracks from the games, arranged for orchestra by Nobuo Uematsu and Shirō Hamaguchi and performed by the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra on February 20, 2002 at the Tokyo International Forum. Track 2-06 was performed by RIKKI accompanied by the orchestra, track 2-08 was performed by Emiko Shiratori, also accompanied by orchestra, and tracks 2-02 and 2-03 are solo piano pieces performed by Aki Kuroda. The album was first released on May 9, 2002 by DigiCube, and subsequently re-released on July 22, 2004 by Square Enix. The original release bears the catalog numbers SSCX-10065-6, and the re-release bears the catalog numbers SQEX-10030-1. The album spans 25 tracks over two disks and covers a duration of 107:27.[22]

The album reached No. 54 on the Oricon charts and was well received by critics and was termed an "amazing soundtrack" and "probably the best Final Fantasy arranged album ever made" by Robert Bogdanowicz of RPGFan.[23][22] Liz Maas of RPGFan agreed; although she found there to be a lack of actual innovation overall, she felt the music was "wonderful" and the album as a whole "rather enjoyable".[22] Patrick Dell of Soundtrack Central felt that the album was "wonderful" and "an impressive display", although he greatly disliked the performance of the choir.[24] Dave of Square Enix Music Online was not as impressed by the album, saying that many of the performances were "lacking cohesion and direction", although he felt that overall it was "satisfactory" and "worth repeated listens".[25] Sophia of Square Enix Music Online, on the other hand, felt that it was a "fantastic album" and a "must have".[26]

Track listing


The Black Mages[edit]

Main article: The Black Mages

The Black Mages are a Japanese instrumental rock band formed by Nobuo Uematsu which arranges Uematsu’s musical compositions in a rock style often similar to progressive metal, achieved with the additional use of synthesizers. They have released three studio albums. The first contains only combat-related instrumentals. It was released eponymously as The Black Mages in 2003, and was published by Square Enix.[27] The second album, The Black Mages II: The Skies Above, was released in 2004 by Universal Music and features a wider array of pieces. Guest vocalists Tomoaki Watanabe, or Mr. Goo, and Kazco Hamano appear on separate tracks, and an original track titled “Blue Blast - Winning the Rainbow” was created for Japanese K-1 fighter Takehiro Murahama.[28] The band released their third album, The Black Mages III: Darkness and Starlight in 2008, published by Sony Music Distribution.[29]


Final Fantasy Song Book: Mahoroba[edit]

Final Fantasy Song Book: Mahoroba
Compilation album by Yuji Hasegawa, Manami Kiyota
Released March 10, 2004
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 50:18
Label Universal Music
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Final Fantasy Song Book: Mahoroba is an arranged album containing a selection of musical tracks from the Final Fantasy series as well as a track from the Ten Plants album, composed by Nobuo Uematsu, arranged for vocals by Yuji Hasegawa, and sung in Japanese by Manami Kiyota. It was released on March 10, 2004, by Universal Music. The release bears the catalog number UPCH-1332. The album includes a hidden track, with the final song of the album playing after 50 seconds of silence on the 10th track.[30]

The album was received by critics, with Patrick Gann of RPGFan calling it a "relaxing, enjoyable experience", and praising the song selection and the quality of the arrangements.[30] Dave of Square Enix Music Online concurred, saying that the album was an "accomplished arrangement" and "a fun album to listen to if you like vocal music".[31] Simon of Square Enix Music Online found that the album was "not as accessible as the other two Final Fantasy Vocal Albums" but still enjoyed and recommended the CD.[32]


More Friends: Music from Final Fantasy[edit]

More Friends: Music from Final Fantasy
Live album by Nobuo Uematsu, Shirō Hamaguchi, Arnie Roth, Tsuyoshi Sekito, Michio Okamiya
Released February 15, 2006
Recorded Gibson Amphitheatre, Universal City, California
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 74:54
Label Square Enix

More Friends: Music from Final Fantasy is a live recording of an orchestral concert of arranged music from the Final Fantasy video game series. The album contains a selection of musical tracks from the games, composed by Nobuo Uematsu, arranged for orchestra by Shirō Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Sekito, and Michio Okamiya, and performed by an orchestra conducted by Arnie Roth on May 16, 2005 at the Gibson Amphitheatre in Universal City, California. The Black Mages, RIKKI, Emiko Shiratori, and a local choir also performed various pieces either with or separate from the orchestra. The album was released on February 15, 2006 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10065. The album spans 13 tracks and covers a duration of 74:54.[33]

The album was well received by critics such as Patrick Gann of RPGFan, who said that "the recording quality is great, almost every song is aimed to please, and rarely do Square Enix fail in this regard".[33] Sophia of Square Enix Music Online concurred, terming it "An album with a little bit of everything" and "a must-have for any Final Fantasy fan".[34]



Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy[edit]

Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy
Live album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released December 4, 2007
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 74:22
Label AWR Records

Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy is a recording of orchestral music from the Final Fantasy video game series. The album contains a selection of musical tracks from the games, composed by Nobuo Uematsu, arranged for orchestra by Shirō Hamaguchi, Sachiko Miyano, Naoshi Mizuta, Hiroyuki Nakayama, and Arnie Roth, and performed by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. It was recorded in August 2007 at the Stockholm Concert Hall, prior to the "Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy" concert tour, which opened in Stockholm on December 4, 2007. The album was released on December 4, 2007 by AWR Records with the catalog number AWR-10101. The album spans 13 tracks and covers a duration of 74:22.[35]

The album received mixed reviews from critics, with Patrick Gann of RPGFan saying that "The recording quality is decent, the performance is standard, and it's all the classic Final Fantasy you've come to love", but expressing disappointment that the album contained only one new arrangement, with the other songs composed of arrangements originally made for other concerts.[35] Andre of Square Enix Music Online, however, despite also wishing for more original arrangements, felt that the quality was superb and that the album as a whole was "one of life and energy."[36] Chris of Square Enix Music Online also praised the album, finding similar features and flaws.[37]


Final Fantasy Finest Box[edit]

Final Fantasy Finest Box
Box set by Nobuo Uematsu
Released March 28, 2007
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length Disk 1: 72:56 (Final Fantasy IV)
Disk 2: 61:20 (Final Fantasy V)
Disk 3: 67:22 (Final Fantasy V)
Disk 4: 58:15 (Final Fantasy VI)
Disk 5: 57:28 (Final Fantasy VI)
Disk 6: 73:07 (Final Fantasy VI)
Label Square Enix

Final Fantasy Finest Box is a promotional album containing the soundtracks from Final Fantasy IV Advance, Final Fantasy V Advance and Final Fantasy VI Advance, all composed by Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy IV disk included several tracks which were not included in the original OST, such as the "Chocobo Forest" theme, the music for the dancing girl, the short intro to "Cry in Sorrow/Sorrow and Loss", and various fanfares. The other two games' disks included all the same tracks as their respective OSTs, remade for the hardware of the Game Boy Advance.[38][39] It was offered on March 28, 2007 to 5,000 people in Japan as part of the "Finest Fantasy for Advance" campaign. The box set spans 183 tracks and covers a duration of 6:30:28. The album was well received by critics such as Mark Tjan of RPGFan, who praised the quality of the remade songs, though he lamented the price of the collection due to the limited release.[38]


Voices of the Lifestream[edit]

Voices of the Lifestream
Studio album by OverClocked ReMix
Released September 14, 2007
Length 3:27:46
Label OverClocked ReMix
Producer Andrew Aversa (zircon)

Voices of the Lifestream is an unofficial tribute album released by OverClocked ReMix as a tribute to Nobuo Uematsu's score for Final Fantasy VII. The album was released on September 14, 2007 to coincide with the 10th anniversary of Final Fantasy VII.[40] Since its release, the collection has received praise from numerous video game sites and professional composers.[40] As an unofficial album, the collection is only available as a free download.


Final Fantasy Remix[edit]

Final Fantasy Remix
Remix album by Ante
Released August 6, 2008
Recorded Saidera Mastering
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 55:29
Label Square Enix

Final Fantasy Remix is a remix album containing dance club remixes of music from games throughout the series by Ante, a DJ group composed by Ian Hartley and Matt Baggiani. It was released on August 6, 2008, by Square Enix. The release bears the catalog number SQEX-10119.[41]

The album was poorly received by critics; Patrick Gann of RPGFan said that while it was better than the previous time Final Fantasy music had been remixed in this style, in Final Fantasy Mix, it was still "a disappointment". He felt that the album was full of "amateur-ish mistakes that no remixer should allow", lamented the track selection, and said that several of the remixes had mistakes related to basic musical theory. Though still finding fault with them, he singled out "Eternal Wind" and "Zanarkand" as the best tracks of a poor album.[41]


Guitar Solo Final Fantasy[edit]

Guitar Solo Final Fantasy Official Best Collection
Compilation album by Yuji Sekiguchi
Released September 20, 2008
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 50:22
Label Square Enix

Guitar Solo Final Fantasy Official Best Collection is a book of sheet music for 25 Final Fantasy pieces arranged for solo guitar that also has a CD soundtrack of the pieces performed by arranger Yuji Sekiguchi.[42] The pieces are done rather faithfully, without much artistic embellishment from their in-game versions.[43] A reviewer liked the album, but wished that some of the pieces had at least been duets to allow more of the music than the main melodic line.[43]

Those Who Distorted[edit]

Those Who Distorted
Remix album by Cellythm
Released March 25, 2009
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 19:46
Label Dog Ear Records

Those Who Distorted is a mini-album of three Final Fantasy arrangements as well as three arrangements of classic rock songs performed by Cellythm, a cello quartet. It was published by Nobuo Uematsu's Dog Ear Records on March 25, 2009.[44] The group has previously performed Final Fantasy arrangements at a concert by The Black Mages on August 9, 2008.[45] The tracklist for the album is "Those Who Fight Further" from Final Fantasy VII, "Immigrant Song" by Led Zeppelin, "Battle Theme" from Final Fantasy VI, "Clash on the Big Bridge" from Final Fantasy V, "Eleanore Rigby" by The Beatles, and "Land of Hope and Glory" by Edward W.[44] The album has a catalog number of DERP-10004 and its six tracks cover a duration of 19:46.[46]


Distant Worlds II: More Music from Final Fantasy[edit]

Distant Worlds II: More Music from Final Fantasy
Live album by Nobuo Uematsu
Released June 1, 2010
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 1:02:38
Label AWR Records

Distant Worlds II: More Music from Final Fantasy is a recording of orchestral music from the Final Fantasy video game series. It features more tracks composed for the Distant Worlds concert series that were either not included or not written yet when the Distant Worlds album was released. The selection of tracks was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, arranged for orchestra by Arnie Roth, and performed by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. The album has a catalog number of AWR-10102 and a total length of 1:02:38 across thirteen tracks.[47] Susan Calloway sang as the vocal soloist for "Suteki Da Ne" and "A Place to Call Home - Melodies of Life".


Piano Opera Final Fantasy I/II/III[edit]

Piano Opera Final Fantasy I/II/III
Remix album by Hiroyuki Nakayama
Released February 29, 2012
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 49:12
Label Square Enix

Piano Opera Final Fantasy I/II/III is an album of piano arrangements of the first three games in the Final Fantasy video game series. It features thirteen tracks arranged and performed by Hiroyuki Nakayama: four from the first game, three from the second, four from the third, and two medleys of tracks from all three games. The album has a catalog number of SQEX-10302 and it covers a duration of 49:12. Jayson Napolitano of Original Sound Version was "impressed with this album", and said that Nakayama did a "fantastic job".[48]


Piano Opera Final Fantasy IV/V/VI[edit]

Piano Opera Final Fantasy IV/V/VI
Remix album by Hiroyuki Nakayama
Released May 16, 2012
Genre Video game soundtrack
Label Square Enix

Piano Opera Final Fantasy IV/V/VI is an album of piano arrangements of the fourth through sixth games in the Final Fantasy video game series. It features twelve tracks arranged and performed by Hiroyuki Nakayama in consultation with composer Nobuo Uematsu. The album was planned to be released on May 16, 2012.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]