List of Final Fantasy media

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Final Fantasy is a series of role-playing video games developed and published by Square Enix (formerly Square). Its first game premiered in Japan in 1987, and Final Fantasy games have subsequently been localized for markets in North America, Europe and Australia, on nearly every video game console since its debut on the Nintendo Entertainment System. Final Fantasy is Square Enix's most successful franchise, having sold over 97 million units worldwide to date.[1] In addition to traditional role-playing games, the series includes tactical role-playing games, portable games, massively multiplayer online role-playing games, and games for mobile phones. Its popularity has placed it as the sixth-best-selling video game franchise, and the series has won multiple awards over the years.[2]

In addition to the 14 games released as part of the main (numbered) series and their many spin-offs and related titles, the Final Fantasy series has spawned many works in other media including anime, movies, novels and manga, and radio dramas. Final Fantasy: Unlimited, originally a stand-alone anime series, now has its own sub-franchise which includes video games. Many games, particularly the main series, have soundtrack album releases featuring their music in different arrangements. Square Enix has also consistently released companion books for its games which provide additional backstory and plot information, as well as detailed walkthroughs for the game. Since the announcement of Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Square Enix has focused on "polymorphic content", expanding each game world with material on many video game platforms, as well as other forms of media.[3]

Video games[edit]

Each game in the main series takes place in a different fictional universe, although beginning with Final Fantasy X-2, additional video games set in the main series games' worlds have been released.[4] Compilation of Final Fantasy VII and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy are cross-platform multimedia projects consisting of games, films, books, and other media centered around their respective main series game, Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy XIII.[3][5] Final Fantasy Tactics, although originally envisioned as a spin-off game, became its own series as part of Ivalice Alliance, which counts Final Fantasy XII in its membership.[6]

A large number of spin-off video games have also been made for the Final Fantasy series. These spin-off games vary in their relation to the main series; the first, The Final Fantasy Legend games, were marketed as related in North America but were considered to be the first three games of the SaGa series in their native Japan, and later SaGa games released outside of Japan bear no Final Fantasy branding.[7] Dissidia Final Fantasy, on the other hand, is a fighting game using characters from the main series exclusively.[8] Overall, more than 30 games have been released as spin-offs of the main Final Fantasy series, many within their own sub-series.

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy December 18, 1987[9] July 12, 1990[10] March 14, 2003[11] (PlayStation)
Notes:
Final Fantasy II December 17, 1988[9] April 8, 2003[11] (PlayStation) March 14, 2003[11] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Famicom
  • Also available on WonderSwan Color,[20] PlayStation,[21] Game Boy Advance,[14] mobile phone,[22] PlayStation Portable,[23] Virtual Console,[17] PlayStation Network,[24] and iOS[19]
Final Fantasy III April 27, 1990[9] November 14, 2006[25] (Nintendo DS) May 4, 2007[25] (Nintendo DS)
Notes:
  • Released on Famicom
  • Also available on Virtual Console[17]
  • Full 3D remake for Nintendo DS,[26] iOS and PC.
Final Fantasy IV July 19, 1991[27] November 23, 1991[28] February 27, 2002[29] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Super Famicom, first released in North America as "Final Fantasy II" on Super Nintendo Entertainment System[30]
  • Also available on PlayStation,[31] WonderSwan Color,[32] Game Boy Advance,[33] mobile phone,[34] and Virtual Console[17]
  • Full 3D remake for Nintendo DS[35]
Final Fantasy V December 6, 1992[27] October 5, 1999[36] (PlayStation) February 27, 2002[29] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Super Famicom
  • Also available on PlayStation[37] Game Boy Advance,[38] Virtual Console,[17] and PlayStation Network[39]
Final Fantasy VI April 2, 1994[27] October 11, 1994[40] March 1, 2002[41] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Super Famicom, first released in North America as "Final Fantasy III" on Super Nintendo Entertainment System[42]
  • Also available on PlayStation[41] Game Boy Advance,[43] and Virtual Console[17]
Final Fantasy VII January 31, 1997[44] September 7, 1997[45] November 17, 1997[46]
Notes:
Final Fantasy VIII February 11, 1999[44] September 9, 1999[50] October 27, 1999[51]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Also available on Microsoft Windows personal computer[52] and PlayStation Network[53]
Final Fantasy IX July 7, 2000[54] November 13, 2000[54] February 16, 2001[54]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
Final Fantasy X July 19, 2001[55] December 17, 2001[55] May 24, 2002[55]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XI May 16, 2002[57] October 28, 2003[58] September 17, 2004[59]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation 2, Microsoft Windows personal computer, and Xbox 360
  • Five expansion packs and three "add-on scenarios" released in the following years[60]
Final Fantasy XII March 16, 2006[61] October 31, 2006[62] February 23, 2007[63]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation 2
  • International version released in Japan[64]
Final Fantasy XIII December 17, 2009[65] March 9, 2010[66] March 9, 2010[66]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIV September 21, 2010[67] September 21, 2010[68][69] September 21, 2010[70]
Notes:
  • Released on Microsoft Windows and PlayStation 3; to be released on PlayStation 4

Film and television[edit]

Square's initial forays into film and television were critical and commercial failures. Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals was poorly received and the box office failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within lead to the merger between Square and Enix.[71][72][73] The series did not have success in film until Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, which ultimately won several awards for "best anime feature" and sold over 2.4 million copies within a year.[74][75][76]

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals March 21, 1994[77] November 24, 1998[78] none
Notes:
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within September 15, 2001[79] July 11, 2001[80] August 3, 2001[80]
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited October 2, 2001[81] October 28, 2003[82] March 15, 2004[83]
Notes:
  • Original 25 episode animated television series by GONZO featuring concepts and themes from the Final Fantasy games
Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children September 14, 2005[84] April 25, 2006[84] April 24, 2006[84]
Notes:

Radio drama[edit]

Despite its decline in the United States, radio drama has remained popular in Japan. The series features a small number of radio drama releases.

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy Tactics Advance February 26, 2003[87] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited Before 2003 none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited After 2 2003 none none
Notes:
  • Radio drama which continues the story of the anime[89]

Soundtracks[edit]

The primary composer of music for the main series was Nobuo Uematsu, who single-handedly composed the soundtracks for the first nine games, as well as directed the production of many of the albums. Music for the spin-off series and main series games beginning with Final Fantasy X was created by a variety of composers including Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, Hitoshi Sakimoto, and Kumi Tanioka, as well as many others.[2] In addition to the original soundtracks, listed below, many games have inspired orchestral, vocal, or piano arrangement albums, as well as compilation albums featuring music from several Final Fantasy games.

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

All Sounds of Final Fantasy I & II December 21, 1988[90] none none
Notes:
  • One CD (62:33) with 49 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DataM/Polystar
Final Fantasy III Original Sound Version July 15, 1991[91] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV Original Sound Version June 14, 1991[92] August 21, 2001[93] none
Notes:
  • One CD (58:23) with 44 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Square Co. and NTT Publishing
Final Fantasy V Original Sound Version December 7, 1992[94] none none
Notes:
  • Two CDs (2:08:30) with 67 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Square Co. and NTT Publishing
Final Fantasy VI Original Sound Version March 25, 1994[95] July 1, 1994[96] none
Notes:
  • Three CDs (3:07:21) with 61 tracks
  • Released in Japan by NTT Publishing
Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack February 10, 1997[97] none none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:39:53) with 85 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy VIII Original Soundtrack March 1, 1999[98] January 2000[99] none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:09:30) with 74 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy IX Original Soundtrack August 30, 2000[100] none none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:46:31) with 110 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy X Original Soundtrack August 1, 2001[101] none none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:32:26) with 91 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack June 5, 2002[102] none none
Notes:
  • Two CDs (1:51:57) with 51 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy XII Original Soundtrack May 31, 2006[103] January 31, 2012 none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:54:34) with 100 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Aniplex
Final Fantasy XIII Original Soundtrack January 27, 2010[104] none none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:04:06) with 85 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Square Enix

Companion books[edit]

Starting with Final Fantasy III, Square began publishing guide books for its games which traditionally include additional content such as developer interviews and expanded plot and setting information. Studio BentStuff wrote the first Ultimania book for Final Fantasy VIII in 1999, though the company had been contracted to write Final Fantasy VII True Script Dissection for the previous game. Since then, Ultimania books have been written for every major Final Fantasy title, including Battle Ultimania, Scenario Ultimania, and Ultimania Omega editions for some games.[105] Square experimented with online content delivery with Final Fantasy IX Online Ultimania, but the move was criticized for forcing customers to buy a print guide while releasing most of the information online.[106] Another online Ultimania was planned for Final Fantasy XI, but it was dropped during development.[107] Square Enix has produced expanded editions to some books, such as Final Fantasy VII 10th Anniversary Ultimania Revised Edition.[108] In addition to the Ultimania series, Square Enix also publishes an Official Complete Guide series of guide books.[109]

Novels and manga[edit]

Many Final Fantasy games have been adapted as novels and manga series. With the advent of the Internet, web novels and digital publishing have also become common. These stories act as companion pieces, offering an interpretation of the game's events or expanding the plot of the games by depicting additional scenarios.

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy II Muma no Meikyū April 1989[110] none none
Notes:
Yūkyū no Kaze Densetsu Final Fantasy III September 1992[111] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within none June 26, 2001[112] none
Notes:
Sō no Kizuna March 2002[113] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited After May 2002[114] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy XI ~The Out of Orders~ April 19, 2003[115] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy XI May 2003[116] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles ~Hatenaki Sora no Mukō ni~ January 10, 2004[119] none none
Notes:
On the Way to a Smile September 14, 2005[120] February 20, 2007[85] February 20, 2007[85]
Notes:
  • Collection of two novellas, "Case of Denzel" and "Case of Tifa", set in Final Fantasy VII's continuity, written by Kazushige Nojima and published in the book Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children Prologue
  • Released in English in the Advent Children Limited Edition Collector's Set along with "Case of Barret" written specifically for that release
  • Four more stories, "Case of Yuffie", "Case of Red XIII", "Case of Shinra", and "Case of the Lifestream", and the previous three were published in a single anthology in Japan by Square Enix, on April 16, 2009[121]
  • (JP) ISBN 978-4-7575-2462-0
Final Fantasy XII December 22, 2006[122] none none
Notes:
Adventure Log none March 20, 2007[123] none
Notes:
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles Ring of Fates 4 Komaansoroji Komikku March 1, 2008[124] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV December 25, 2008[125] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV: The After March 26, 2009[126] none none
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIII Episode Zero: Promise September 28, 2009[127] none none
Notes:
  • Series of web novels written by Jun Eishima and first published on the official Japanese Final Fantasy XIII website, depicting the thirteen days leading up to the events of the game
  • Later published in a single anthology by Square Enix on December 24, 2009[128]
  • (JP) ISBN 978-4-7575-2770-6

See also[edit]


References[edit]

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