List of German desserts

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of German desserts. German cuisine has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region. The southern regions of Germany, including Bavaria and neighboring Swabia, share many dishes. Furthermore, across the border in Austria, one will find many different dishes.

German desserts[edit]

A[edit]

Aachener Printen is a pastry and a type of Lebkuchen originating from the city of Aachen in Germany. The term is a protected designation of origin and so all manufacturers can be found in or near Aachen.


C[edit]

D[edit]

Dominostein is a sweet primarily sold during Christmas season in Germany and Austria.

F[edit]

G[edit]

J[edit]

A Berliner is similar to a jelly doughnut

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

P[edit]

Prinzregententorte is a Bavarian cake, which consists of at least six thin layers of sponge cake interlaid with chocolate buttercream, with a dark chocolate glaze.

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

V[edit]

Wibele are very small, sweet biscuits originating from the Franconian city of Langenburg in Germany, though nowadays they are considered a Swabian speciality.
Zwetschgenkuchen is a sheet cake or pie made from yeast dough or shortcrust dough that is thinly spread onto a baking sheet and covered with pitted plums.

W[edit]

Z[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Frankfurt Christmas Market Retrieved 25 August 2013
  2. ^ Recipe at gourmet.org
  3. ^ Recipe at grouprecipes.com
  4. ^ Arnold Zabert: Backen - Die neue große Schule, Zabert Sandmann, Hamburg 1985, S. 125
  5. ^ Broyles, Addie (December 11, 2012). "Relish Austin: Pfeffernüsse, a quirky Christmas cookie and so much more". American Statesman. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  6. ^ Clark, Melissa (September 21, 2010). "Spiking Summer Fruit in Order to Preserve It". The New York Times. Retrieved September 22, 2010. 

External links[edit]