List of Indigenous Australian firsts

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Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Australian Aboriginal Flag.svg
Didgeridoo Boomerang Torres Strait Islander face mask David Unaipon Albert Namatjira Noel Pearson
Ernie Dingo David Gulpilil Jessica Mauboy
David Wirrpanda Cathy Freeman Christine Anu
Total population
517,000, 2.5% of Australia's population (in 2006)[1][2]
Languages
Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol
Religion
Majority Christianity, with minority following traditional animist (Dreamtime) beliefs.
Related ethnic groups
see List of Indigenous Australian group names

Indigenous Australians are the original inhabitants of the Australian continent and nearby islands. The Torres Strait Islanders are indigenous to the Torres Strait Islands, which are at the northernmost tip of Queensland near Papua New Guinea. The term "Aboriginal" has traditionally been applied to indigenous inhabitants of mainland Australia, Tasmania, and some of the other adjacent islands.

Contents

18th century
19th century: 1820s1830s1840s1850s1860s1870s1880s1890s
20th century: 1900s1910s1920s1930s1940s1950s1960s1970s1980s1990s
21st century: 2000s2010s
See also
References

17th century[edit]

1600s[edit]

18th century[edit]

1780s[edit]

  • 1788
    • First Indigenous Australian to live amongst Europeans: Arabanoo.[4]

1790s[edit]

  • 1796
    • First Indigenous Australian to appear in print: Bennelong (see also 1949).[5]

19th century[edit]

1800s[edit]

  • 1802
    • First Indigenous Australian to circumnavigate Australia: Bungaree.[6]

1810s[edit]

  • 1815
    • First Indigenous Australian to be granted land by the colonial authorities: Bungaree.[7]

1820s[edit]

1830s[edit]

  • 1835
    • First Indigenous Australian to be recorded playing western sport: Shiney (cricket in Hobart).[8]
  • 1836

1840s[edit]

1850s[edit]

  • 1856
    • Indigenous Australian males first given the right to vote in elections (South Australia).[10]

1860s[edit]

  • 1864
    • First time portions of the Bible published in an Indigenous Australian language (Ngarrindjeri).[11]

1870s[edit]

1880s[edit]

1890s[edit]

  • 1897
    • First translation of the New Testament into an Indigenous Australian language (Dieri).[17]

20th century[edit]

1900s[edit]

1910s[edit]

  • 1910
  • 1911
  • 1912
  • 1915
  • 1916
  • 1917

1920s[edit]

1930s[edit]

First major national Indigenous day of protest: Australia Day protest by the Aborigines Progressive Association.[30]

1940s[edit]

1950s[edit]

  • 1950
The first named Indigenous Australian to appear on an Australian stamp: Gwoya Jungarai.
  • 1952
  • 1953
  • 1954
  • 1955
  • 1956
  • 1957
  • 1958
    • First Indigenous Australian woman to be selected for a national sporting side: Faith Coulthard (cricket).[36]
    • First song written and recorded by Indigenous Australians: "Give the Coloured Boy a Chance" (written by Jimmy Little, Snr and recorded by Jimmy Little).[37]
  • 1959
    • First Indigenous Australian entertainer to appear on television: Jimmy Little.[38]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

1990s[edit]

  • 1995
    • First Indigenous Australian to graduate as a veterinary surgeon: Joe Schmidt.[94]

21st century[edit]

2000s[edit]

2010s[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "The estimated resident Indigenous population of Australia at 30 June 1991 was 351,000 people. In 2006, there were 517,000 people, representing 2.5% of the total Australian population. Between 1991 and 2006 the Indigenous population increased by 2.6% per year on average, compared with 1.2% for the total Australian population. The population of Indigenous Australians is projected to increase to between 713,300 and 721,100 people in 2021, at an average growth rate of 2.2% per year": Australian Bureau of Statistics, "Australia" (2009)
  2. ^ "Australian Bureau of Statistics, "States and Territories" (2009)". Abs.gov.au. Retrieved 2 June 2011. 
  3. ^ Fraser, Cleo. "Aborigines repelled first white men in Qld". News.com.au. News International. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "Significant Aboriginal people in Sydney". Indigenous History of Sydney City. Sydney City Council. Retrieved 29 December 2012. 
  5. ^ Smith, Keith. "Bennelong's letter expresses authentic Aboriginal voice". The Australian. Retrieved 11 January 2013. 
  6. ^ McCarthy, FD. "Bungaree (?–1830)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  7. ^ Michelmore, Karen (3 September 2012). "Bungaree: an Indigenous perspective". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 4 September 2012. 
  8. ^ a b Tatz & Tatz, p. 9.
  9. ^ Gale, p. 41.
  10. ^ "Kingsley Pitman collection". NMA Collections. National Museum of Australia. Retrieved 1 April 2014. 
  11. ^ Gale, p. 71.
  12. ^ Mallett, Ashley. "Once upon an all-run nine". CricInfo. ESPN. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  13. ^ Whitehorn, Zane, "The church on the $50 note", Indigenous Newslines, March–May 2010, p. 17.
  14. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 104.
  15. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 18.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g "Electoral Milestones - Timetable for Indigenous Australians". www.aec.gov.au. Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  17. ^ Gale, p. 62.
  18. ^ "Indigenous recording revives a lost technology". Radio National Books and Arts Daily. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 11 July 2013. 
  19. ^ Errington, Steve (February 2010). "Jimmy Melbourne, the first Aboriginal Footballer". Trust News 2 (1): 10–11. ISSN 1835-2316. Retrieved 21 January 2013. 
  20. ^ Bews, Andrew (7 May 2007). "Changing Colours". Geelong Advertiser. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  21. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 20.
  22. ^ Tatz & Tatz (2000), p. 161.
  23. ^ Gibson, Jano. "Heroic Aboriginal prisoner's medal on display". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  24. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 199.
  25. ^ Heiss, Anita. "Who is David Unaipon?". Message Club. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  26. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 101.
  27. ^ Gale, p. 64-65.
  28. ^ Foley, Gary. "Sir Douglas Nicholls (Pastor)". KooriWeb. Gary Foley. Retrieved 3 January 2013. 
  29. ^ Rajaram, D. "Yorta Yorta man a hero to the Jews", Koori Mail, 14 November 2012, p. 21.
  30. ^ "Day of Mourning protest 75 years anniversary". www.nirs.org.au. National Indigenous Radio Service. Retrieved 23 January 2013. 
  31. ^ "Jimmy Little". Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group Limited. Retrieved 21 January 2013. 
  32. ^ "Captain Reginald Walter (Reg) Saunders MBE". Australian War Memorial. Australian War Memorial. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  33. ^ Hall, Robert A. (1989), The Black Diggers: Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Second World War, Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press. ISBN 0-85575-319-6.
  34. ^ "On this day: Bennelong taken as go-between". Australian Geographic. Australian Geographic. Retrieved 3 January 2013. 
  35. ^ "Albert Namatjira and citizenship, 1958-59". Collaborating for Indigenous Rights. National Museum of Australia. Retrieved 6 May 2013. 
  36. ^ Tatz & Tatz (2000), p. 92.
  37. ^ Ramsland, J. & Mooney, C. (2006), Brolga Publishing, p. 206. ISBN 192078585X.
  38. ^ a b "Jimmy Little AO 1978". Australian Country Music Hands of Fame. Australian Country Music Hall of Fame. 
  39. ^ Tatz & Tatz (2000), p. 43.
  40. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 201.
  41. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 103.
  42. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 250.
  43. ^ Tatz, C. & Tatz, P., p. 53.
  44. ^ "Sounds of Australia". www.aso.gov.au. Australian Screen. Retrieved 14 August 2012. 
  45. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 189.
  46. ^ Tracker, August 2012, New South Wales Aboriginal Land Council: Sydney. p. 46.
  47. ^ "Yirrkala bark petitions 1963 (Cth)". Documenting Democracy. Government of Australia. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  48. ^ (English) "Modern Australian poetry". Australian Government. 
  49. ^ Koori Mail, "Our competitors at the London 2012 Olympics", 8 August 2012, p. 91.
  50. ^ Indigenous Newslines, "Reconciliation in the ranks", October–December 2010, p. 17.
  51. ^ "Indigenous Australia Timeline - 1901 to 1969". australianmuseum.net.au. Australian Museum. Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  52. ^ Elder, John. "Fight to the end". Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Digital. Retrieved 29 December 2012. 
  53. ^ Whitehorn, Zane. "Show no fear: Lionel Rose", Indigenous Newslines, January–March 2011, Australian Government: Canberra, p. 21.
  54. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 47.
  55. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 261.
  56. ^ McMillan, p. 247.
  57. ^ "First Aboriginal Socceroo confident". The Sydney Morning Herald. AAP. 17 May 2006. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  58. ^ "CONDOLENCES Bonner, Mr Neville Thomas, AO". Parliament of Australia. 1999. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  59. ^ Mundine, P. "As it happened", Tracker, August 2012, p. 48.
  60. ^ "FARMER, Graham". It's an Honour. Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved 15 January 2013. 
  61. ^ "Patrons". www.pff.com.au. The Graham "Polly" Farmer Foundation. Retrieved 15 January 2013. 
  62. ^ "The Aboriginal Flag". www.aiatsis.gov.au. Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  63. ^ "Aboriginal theatres". Creative Spirits. Jens Korff. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  64. ^ Sheppard, Heidi. "Indigenous Broadcasting". australia.gov.au. Australian Government. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  65. ^ Tatz & Tatz (1996)
  66. ^ Rolfe, C. p. 266.
  67. ^ Webster, Andrew. "Rugby league great Arthur Beetson dead after suffering heart attack while exercising". The Daily Telegraph. News Corporation. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  68. ^ Indigenous Knowledges in a changing world, Official Program, Charles Darwin Symposium, 2013, Charles Darwin University, Darwin.
  69. ^ "Aboriginal South Australians and Parliament". www.parliament.sa.gov.au. Parliament of South Australia. Retrieved 3 January 2013. 
  70. ^ Raftery, Judith. "Hampton, Kenneth Valentine (Ken) (1935–1987)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Retrieved 9 January 2013. 
  71. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 156.
  72. ^ Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation (1994). "Chapter 19. Newcastle: Building a Community". Walking Together: The First Steps. Report of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation to Federal Parliament 1991-94. Australian Government Printing Service. Retrieved 2008-03-10. 
  73. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 266.
  74. ^ Bock, A. "Academics open doors to social benefits", The Age, 17 March 2014, Education Supplement, p. 14.
  75. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 162.
  76. ^ "Wrong Side of the Road restoration to premiere at the 60th Sydney Film Festival". nfsa.gov.au. National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  77. ^ Condie, T. "'Pioneer' Virginia honoured", Koori Mail, 26 January 2000, p. 3.
  78. ^ "Ian Goolagong appointed National Indigenous Coach". tennis.com.au. Tennis Australia. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  79. ^ a b Tatz & Tatz, p. 31.
  80. ^ "Pat O'Shane (1941 - )". Australians. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 11 September 2013. 
  81. ^ The Australian Indigenous Doctors' Association, p. 4.
  82. ^ "Charles Perkins: Freedom Rides". Skwirk. Red Apple Education Ltd. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  83. ^ Collins, Ben. "A new chapter in Kimberley state politics". ABC Kimberley. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  84. ^ "Marcia Ella". The Portraits. National Portrait Gallery. 
  85. ^ "Professor Pat Dudgeon". AIPA. The Australian Indigenous Psychologists Association. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  86. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 133.
  87. ^ a b c "Women Who Have Signed The Quilt & Their "Firsts"". National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame. National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  88. ^ Ferber, E., "Aborigine Collection Portrays a People's Plight", Christian Science Monitor, 29 October 1990, p. 14.
  89. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 88.
  90. ^ Tatz & Tatz, p. 37.
  91. ^ "Torres Strait Islander Flag". It's an Honour. Government of Australia. Retrieved 21 January 2013. 
  92. ^ Moncrieff, D. "Indigenous Round on in SA.", National Indigenous Times, 1 August 2012, p. 42.
  93. ^ "Women New Canberra Uni chancellor Tom Calma calls for indigenous scholarship backing". The Australian. News Ltd. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 
  94. ^ "2012 Conference speakers biographies". Animal Management in Remote and Rural Indigenous Communities. AMRRIC. Retrieved 18 October 2013. 
  95. ^ Koori Mail, “Our competitors at the London 2012 Olympics”, 8 August 2012, p. 91.
  96. ^ "Judge Bob Bellear State Funeral". Hansard. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 11 January 2013. 
  97. ^ Tatz, C. & Tatz, P. (2000), p. 193.
  98. ^ Webb, Carolyn. "What does being black mean anyway?". The Age. Fairfax Digital. Retrieved 29 December 2012. 
  99. ^ "Carol Martin". Indigenous Stock Exchange. BAMA ISX. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 
  100. ^ 2 August 2008 12:00 am (2 Aug 2008). "INSPIRE: Kelvin Kong". The Australian. Retrieved 27 June 2010. 
  101. ^ Doogue, Geraldine (7 November 2010). "Yulki:Arnhem Land Priest". Compass. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  102. ^ Indigenous Newslines, "Taking it to the world", October–December 2010, p. 13.
  103. ^ Bowen, Nick. "Lynch Receives Second Chance at Roos". AFL Victoria. Sporting Pulse. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  104. ^ Argent, P., "The new generation", Koori Mail, 16 January 2013, p. 71.
  105. ^ "Ken Wyatt makes Australian political history". Special Broadcasting Service. 2010. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
  106. ^ a b Potok, Richard. "2012 Charlie Perkins Scholarship winners announced". The Charlie Perkins Trust. Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  107. ^ "Australia’s first female aboriginal archdeacon congratulated". reconciliation.org.au. Reconciliation Australia. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  108. ^ Way, Peter. "Liverpool-born Scott Gardiner first indigenous Australian on PGA tour". Daily Telegraph. News Limited. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
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  110. ^ "Mills dumped as Giles takes top Territory job". abc. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
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  113. ^ "Nova Peris becomes first Indigenous woman in federal parliament". The Guardian. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 

References[edit]

  • Australian Indigenous Doctors' Association (2009), Journeys into Medicine, AIDA: Sydney. ISBN 978 0 646 52119 0.
  • Gale, M-A. (1997) Dhanum Djorra'wuy Dhawu, Aboriginal Research Institute: Underdale. ISBN 0 86803 182 8.
  • McMillan, A. (2007) An Intruder's Guide to East Arnhem Land, Niblock Publishing: Darwin. ISBN 978 0 9803904 1 4.
  • Rolfe, C. (2009) Winners of the Melbourne Cup: Stories That Stopped a Nation, Red Dog Books: Sydney. ISBN 1 74203 513 2.
  • Tatz, C. & Tatz, P. (1996) Black Diamonds, Allen & Unwin: Sydney. ISBN 1 86448 065 3.
  • Tatz, C. & Tatz, P. (2000) Black Gold, Aboriginal Studies Press: Canberra. ISBN 0 85575 367 6.