List of International Mathematical Olympiad participants

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The International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) is an annual international high school mathematics competition focused primarily on pre-collegiate mathematics, and is the oldest of the international science olympiads.[1] The awards for exceptional performance include medals for roughly the top half participants, and honorable mentions for participants who solve at least one problem perfectly.[2]

This is a list of participants who have achieved notability. This includes participants that went on to become notable mathematicians, participants who won medals at an exceptionally young age, or participants who scored highly.

Exceptionally young participants[edit]

Terence Tao is the youngest bronze, silver, and gold medalist, respectively, in IMO history.
Bronze medal
  • Terence Tao (Australia), in 1986 at age 10 years, 358 days
  • Raúl Chávez Sarmiento (Peru), in 2009 at age 11 years, 265 days
  • Akshay Venkatesh (Australia), in 1994 at age 12 years, 235 days
Silver medal
Gold medal
Perfect score
  • Noam Elkies (United States), in 1981 at age 14 years, 323 days
  • Sergei Konyagin (Soviet Union), in 1972 at age 15 years, 77 days
  • Vladimir Drinfeld (Soviet Union), in 1969 at age 15 years, 147 days

High-scoring participants[edit]

Ciprian Manolescu, the only person to achieve three perfect scores at the IMO (1995–1997).

The following table lists all IMO Winners who have won at least three gold medals, with corresponding years and non-gold medals received noted (P denotes a perfect score.)

Name Team(s) Years
Teodor von Burg Serbia Serbia 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Lisa Sauermann Germany Germany 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 P
Nipun Pitimanaaree  Thailand 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Christian Reiher Germany Germany 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
Reid W. Barton United States United States 1998 1999 2000 2001 P
Wolfgang Burmeister East Germany East Germany 1967 1968 1969 1970 P 1971
Iurie Boreico Moldova Moldova 2003 2004 2005 P 2006 P 2007
Lim Jeck Singapore Singapore 2009 2010 2011 2012 P 2013
Martin Härterich West Germany West Germany 1985 1986 1987 P 1988 1989
László Lovász Hungary Hungary 1963 1964 1965 1966
József Pelikán Hungary Hungary 1963 1964 1965 1966
Nikolay Nikolov  Bulgaria 1992 1993 1994 1995 P
Kentaro Nagao Japan Japan 1997 1998 1999 2000
Vladimir Barzov Bulgaria Bulgaria 1999 2000 2001 2002
Peter Scholze Germany Germany 2004 2005 P 2006 2007
Makoto Soejima Japan Japan 2005 2007 2008 2009 P
Simon Norton United Kingdom United Kingdom 1967 1968 1969 P
John Rickard United Kingdom United Kingdom 1975 P 1976 1977 P
Sergey Ivanov Soviet Union Soviet Union 1987 P 1988 1989 P
Theodor Banica Romania Romania 1989 1990 1991
Evgenia Malinnikova Soviet Union Soviet Union 1989 1990 P 1991 P
Sergey Norine Russia Russia 1994 P 1995 P 1996
Yuliy Sannikov Ukraine Ukraine 1994 P 1995 1996
Ciprian Manolescu Romania Romania 1995 P 1996 P 1997 P
Ivan Ivanov Bulgaria Bulgaria 1996 1997 1998
Nikolai Dourov Russia Russia 1996 1997 1998
Tamás Terpai Hungary Hungary 1997 1998 1999
Stefan Hornet Romania Romania 1997 1998 1999
Vladimir Dremov Russia Russia 1998 1999 2000
Mihai Manea Romania Romania 1999 2000 2001
Tiankai Liu United States United States 2001 2002 2004
Oleg Golberg Russia Russia ('02, '03)
United States United States ('04)
2002 2003 2004
Béla András Rácz Hungary Hungary 2002 2003 2004 P
Andrey Badzyan Russia Russia 2002 2003 2004 P
Rosen Kralev Bulgaria Bulgaria 2003 2004 2005 P
Przemysław Mazur Poland Poland 2006 2007 2008
Tak Wing Ching Hong Kong Hong Kong 2009 2010 2011
Chung Song Hong North Korea North Korea 2011 2012 2013
Dong Ryul Kim South Korea South Korea 2012 2013 2014

Notable participants[edit]

A number of IMO participants have gone on to become notable mathematicians. The following IMO participants have either received a Fields Medal, a Wolf Prize or a Clay Research Award, awards which recognise groundbreaking research in mathematics; a European Mathematical Society Prize, an award which recognizes young researchers; or one of the American Mathematical Society's awards (a Blumenthal Award in Pure Mathematics, Bôcher Memorial Prize in Analysis, Cole Prize in Algebra, Cole Prize in Number Theory or Veblen Prize in Geometry and Topology) recognizing research in specific mathematical fields.

G denotes an IMO gold medal, S denotes a silver medal, B denotes a bronze medal, and P denotes a perfect score.

 Name   Team   IMO   Fields Medal   Wolf Prize   EMS Prize   AMS research prizes   Clay Award 
 Grigory Margulis   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 S 1962 
1978
2005
 George Lusztig   Romania Romania 
 S 1963, S 1962 
1985 (Cole algebra)
 Henryk Iwaniec   Poland Poland 
 S 1966, 1965 
2002 (Cole number theory)
 László Lovász   Hungary Hungary 
 G 1966, G 1965, G 1964, S 1963 
1999
 Andrei Suslin   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 G 1967 
2000 (Cole algebra)
 Vladimir Drinfeld   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 P 1969 
1990
 Alexander Merkurjev   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 S 1972 
2012 (Cole algebra)
 Pierre-Louis Lions   France France 
 1973 
1994
 János Kollár   Hungary Hungary 
 P 1974, G 1973 
2006 (Cole algebra)
 Jean-Christophe Yoccoz   France France 
 P 1974, S 1973 
1994
 Paul Vojta   United States United States 
 P 1975 
1992 (Cole number theory)
 Alexander Goncharov   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 G 1976 
1992
 Richard Borcherds   United Kingdom United Kingdom 
 G 1978, S 1977 
1998
1992
 Timothy Gowers   United Kingdom United Kingdom 
 P 1981 
1998
1996
 Peter Kronheimer   United Kingdom United Kingdom 
 S 1981 
2007 (Veblen)
 Gábor Tardos   Hungary Hungary 
 S 1982, S 1981, 1979 
1992
 Grigori Perelman   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 P 1982 
   2006[6]
1996[7]
 Alexis Bonnet   France France 
 S 1984, S 1983 
1996
 Laurent Lafforgue   France France 
 S 1985, S 1984 
2002
2000
 Daniel Tătaru   Romania Romania 
 P 1985, P 1984 
2002 (Bôcher)
 Zoltán Szabó   Hungary Hungary 
 S 1985 
2007 (Veblen)
 Jeremy Kahn   United States United States 
 G 1986, G 1985, S 1984, S 1983 
2012
 Ricardo Pérez-Marco   Spain Spain 
 S 1986, 1985 
1996
 Dominic Joyce   United Kingdom United Kingdom 
 S 1986 
2000
 Stanislav Smirnov   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 P 1987, P 1986 
2010
2004
2001
 Terence Tao   Australia Australia 
 G 1988, S 1987, B 1986 
2006
2002 (Bôcher)
2003
 Elon Lindenstrauss   Israel Israel 
 B 1988 
2010
2004
2001 (Blumenthal)
 Ngô Bảo Châu   Vietnam Vietnam 
 G 1989, P 1988 
2010
2004
 Emmanuel Grenier   France France 
 B 1989 
2000
 Vincent Lafforgue   France France 
 P 1991, P 1990 
2000
 Artur Avila   Brazil Brazil 
 G 1995 
2014
2008
 Emmanuel Breuillard   France France 
 G 1995 
2012
 Ben J. Green   United Kingdom United Kingdom 
 S 1995, S 1994 
2008
2004
 Maryam Mirzakhani   Iran Iran 
 P 1995, G 1994 
 2014
2009 (Blumenthal)
2014
 Bo'az Klartag   Israel Israel 
 S 1996 
2008
 Ciprian Manolescu   Romania Romania 
 P 1997, P 1996, P 1995 
2012
 Adrian Ioana   Romania Romania 
 S 1999 
2012
 Peter Scholze   Germany Germany 
 G 2007, G 2006, P 2005, S 2004 
2015 (Cole algebra)
2014

IMO medalists have also gone on to become notable computer scientists. The following IMO medalists have received a Nevanlinna Prize, a Knuth Prize, or a Gödel Prize; these awards recognise research in theoretical computer science. G denotes an IMO gold medal, S denotes a silver medal, B denotes a bronze medal, and P denotes a perfect paper.

 Name   Team   IMO   Nevanlinna Prize   Knuth Prize   Gödel Prize 
 László Lovász   Hungary Hungary 
 G 1966, G 1965, G 1964, S 1963 
1999
2001
 László Babai   Hungary Hungary 
 G 1968, S 1967, B 1966 
1993
 Johan Håstad   Sweden Sweden 
 G 1977 
1994, 2011
 Peter Shor   United States United States 
 S 1977 
1998
1999
 Alexander Razborov   Soviet Union Soviet Union 
 G 1979 
1990
2007
 Subhash Khot   India India 
 S 1995, S 1994 
2014

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "International Mathematics Olympiad (IMO)". 2-1-08.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ "47th International Mathematical Olympiad Results". 2-1-08.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  3. ^ "Solo study is a factor for prodigy". JoongAng Daily. November 28, 2009. 
  4. ^ "15-Year-Old Math Prodigy Enters SNU". Korea Times. November 21, 2008. 
  5. ^ http://www.viitoriolimpici.ro/olimp/profileArchive.htm?method=view&type=student&id=2
  6. ^ Perelman was awarded a Fields Medal for his proof of the Poincaré conjecture, but he declined the Medal.
  7. ^ Perelman was awarded an EMS prize for his proof of the Soul theorem, but he declined the prize.

References[edit]

  • Olson, Steve (2004). Count Down: Six Kids Vie for Glory at the World's Toughest Math Competition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-618-25141-3. 
  • Lord, Mary (2001). "Michael Jordans of Math". U.S. News & World Report. 

External links[edit]