List of International Mathematical Olympiads

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A circle, interlinked with a sideways figure of eight (lemniscate). The circle is half green and half yellow, the lemniscate is a third red, a third blue and a third black. The shapes are featured in front of a white background.
Logo of the International Mathematical Olympiad

The first of the International Mathematical Olympiads (IMOs) was held in Romania in 1959. The oldest of the International Science Olympiads, the IMO has since been held annually, except in 1980. That year, it was cancelled due to internal strife in Mongolia.[1] Because the competition was initially founded for Eastern European countries participating in the Warsaw Pact, under the influence of the Eastern Bloc,[2] the earlier IMOs were hosted only in Eastern European countries, gradually spreading to other nations.[3] Sources differ about the cities hosting some of the early IMOs and the exact dates when they took place.[4]

The first IMO was held in Romania in 1959. Seven countries entered – Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania and the Soviet Union – with the hosts finishing as the top-ranked nation.[5] The number of participating countries has since risen: 14 countries took part in 1969, 50 in 1989, and 104 in 2009.[6]

North Korea is the only country to have been caught cheating, resulting in its disqualification at the 32nd IMO in 1991 and the 51st IMO in 2010.[7] In January 2011, Google gave €1 million to the IMO organization to help cover the costs of the events from 2011–2015.[8]

Olympiads[edit]

Four boys, in their late teens, wearing shirts, ties and blazers, standing in a line. The two on the left are white, while the two on the right are of oriental origin
The four perfect scorers in the 2001 IMO. From left to right: Gabriel Carroll, Reid Barton (both USA), Zhiqiang Zhang and Liang Xiao (both China).
Ten people facing forward, in two lines of five. In the front row are five boys in their late teens. Behind them are four adults, and one person who appears to be in his late teens.
The Bangladesh team at the 2009 IMO
Six boys, standing on a line, all wearing white tops with red logos on their chest. They are holding a red, blue and white striped flag, which features a prominent crown and coat of arms.
Serbia's team for the 2010 IMO
#[6] Venue Year Date[6] Top-ranked country[9] Refs
Romania Braşov and Bucharest 1959 June 23 – July 31  Romania [10]
Romania Sinaia 1960 July 18 – July 25  Czechoslovakia [10]
Hungary Veszprém 1961 July 6 – July 16  Hungary [10]
Czechoslovakia České Budějovice 1962 July 7 – June 15  Hungary [10]
Poland Warsaw and Wrocław 1963 July 5 – June 13  Soviet Union [10]
Soviet Union Moscow 1964 June 30 – July 10  Soviet Union [10]
East Germany East Berlin 1965 June 13 – July 13  Soviet Union [10]
Bulgaria Sofia 1966 July 3 – July 13  Soviet Union [10]
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Cetinje 1967 July 7 – July 13  Soviet Union [10]
10  Soviet Union Moscow 1968 July 5 – July 18  East Germany [10]
11  Romania Bucharest 1969 July 5 – July 20  Hungary [10]
12  Hungary Keszthely 1970 July 8 – July 22  Hungary [10]
13  Czechoslovakia Žilina 1971 July 10 – July 21  Hungary [10]
14  Poland Toruń 1972 July 5 – July 17  Soviet Union [10]
15  Soviet Union Moscow 1973 July 5 – July 16  Soviet Union [10]
16  East Germany Erfurt and East Berlin 1974 July 4 – July 17  Soviet Union [10]
17  Bulgaria Burgas and Sofia 1975 July 3 – July 16  Hungary [10]
18  Austria Lienz 1976 July 2 – July 21  Soviet Union [10]
19  Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade 1977 July 1 – July 13  United States [10]
20  Romania Bucharest 1978 July 3 – July 10  Romania [10]
21  United Kingdom London 1979 June 30 – July 9  Soviet Union [10]
  The 1980 IMO was due to be held in Mongolia. It was cancelled, and split into two unofficial events in Europe.[1]
22  United States Washington, D.C. 1981 July 8 – July 20  United States [10]
23  Hungary Budapest 1982 July 5 – July 14  West Germany [10]
24  France Paris 1983 July 3 – July 12  West Germany [10]
25  Czechoslovakia Prague 1984 June 29 – July 10  Soviet Union [10]
26  Finland Joutsa 1985 June 29 – July 11  Romania [10]
27  Poland Warsaw 1986 July 4 – July 15  Soviet Union
 United States
[10]
28  Cuba Havana 1987 July 5 – July 16  Romania [10]
29  Australia Sydney and Canberra 1988 July 9 – July 21  Soviet Union [10]
30  West Germany Braunschweig 1989 July 13 – July 24  China [10]
31  China Beijing 1990 July 8 – July 19  China [10]
32  Sweden Sigtuna 1991 July 12 – July 23  Soviet Union [10][n 1]
33  Russia Moscow 1992 July 10 – July 21  China [10]
34  Turkey Istanbul 1993 July 13 – July 24  China [10]
35  Hong Kong Hong Kong[n 2] 1994 July 8 – July 20  United States [10]
36  Canada Toronto 1995 July 13 – July 25  China [11]
37  India Bombay 1996 July 5 – July 17  Romania [12]
38  Argentina Mar del Plata 1997 July 18 – July 31  China [13]
39  Taiwan Taipei 1998 July 10 – July 21  Iran [14]
40  Romania Bucharest 1999 July 10 – July 22  China
 Russia
[15]
41  South Korea Daejeon 2000 July 13 – July 25  China [16]
42  United States Washington, D.C. 2001 July 1 – July 14  China [17]
43  United Kingdom Glasgow 2002 July 19 – July 30  China [18]
44  Japan Tokyo 2003 July 7 – July 19  Bulgaria [19]
45  Greece Athens 2004 July 6 – July 18  China [20]
46  Mexico Mérida 2005 July 8 – July 19  China [21]
47  Slovenia Ljubljana 2006 July 6 – July 18  China [22]
48  Vietnam Hanoi 2007 July 19 – July 31  Russia [23]
49  Spain Madrid 2008 July 10 – July 22  China [24]
50  Germany Bremen 2009 July 10 – July 22  China [25]
51  Kazakhstan Astana 2010 July 2 – July 14  China [26]
52  Netherlands Amsterdam 2011 July 13 – July 24  China [27]
53  Argentina Mar del Plata 2012 July 4 – July 16  South Korea [28]
54  Colombia Santa Marta 2013 July 18 – July 28  China [29]
55  South Africa Cape Town[30] 2014
56  Thailand 2015
57  Hong Kong Hong Kong 2016
58  Brazil 2017

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ 1991 marked the Soviet Union's last participation. From 1992, former Soviet Union countries – including Russia – entered separately.[9]
  2. ^ At the time of the Olympiad, Hong Kong was not possessed by the People's Republic of China.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b "UK IMO register". IMO register. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 
  2. ^ "More IMO Facts". Retrieved 2008-03-05. 
  3. ^ "Singapore International Mathematical Olympiad (SIMO) Home Page". Singapore Mathematical Society. Retrieved 2008-02-04. 
  4. ^ "Norwegian Students in International Mathematical Olympiad". Retrieved 2008-03-05. 
  5. ^ "1st IMO 1959". International Mathematical Olympiad. Retrieved 2011-06-20. 
  6. ^ a b c "Timeline". International Mathematical Olympiad. Retrieved 2011-06-20. 
  7. ^ "International Mathematical Olympiad: Democratic People's Republic of Korea". Retrieved 2010-07-17. 
  8. ^ Google Europe Blog: Giving young mathematicians the chance to shine. Googlepolicyeurope.blogspot.com (2011-01-21). Retrieved on 2013-10-29.
  9. ^ a b "Ranking of countries". International Mathematical Olympiad. Retrieved 2011-06-20. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai "US teams at the IMO". Mathematical Association of America. Retrieved 2011-06-19. 
  11. ^ "IMO 1995". Canadian Mathematical Society. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  12. ^ "IMO 1996". Canadian Mathematical Society. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  13. ^ (Spanish) "IMO 1997". Argentina. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  14. ^ "IMO 1998". Republic of China. Archived from the original on 1998-12-05. 
  15. ^ "IMO 1999". Canadian Mathematical Society. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  16. ^ "IMO 2000". Wolfram. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  17. ^ "IMO 2001". Canadian Mathematical Society. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  18. ^ Andreescu, Titu (2004). USA & International Mathematical Olympiads 2002. Mathematical Association of America. ISBN 978-0-88385-815-8. 
  19. ^ "IMO 2003". Japan. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  20. ^ "IMO 2004". Greece. Archived from the original on 2004-06-27. 
  21. ^ "IMO 2005". Mexico. Archived from the original on 2005-07-11. 
  22. ^ "IMO 2006". Slovenia. Archived from the original on 2009-02-28. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  23. ^ "IMO 2007". Vietnam. Archived from the original on 2009-02-12. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  24. ^ "IMO 2008". Spain. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  25. ^ (German) "IMO 2009". Germany. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 
  26. ^ "51st IMO 2010". IMO. Retrieved 2011-07-22. 
  27. ^ "52nd IMO 2011". IMO. Retrieved 2011-07-22. 
  28. ^ "53rd IMO 2012". IMO. Retrieved 2011-07-22. 
  29. ^ "54th International Mathematical Olympiad". Universidad Antonio Nariño. Retrieved July 20, 2012. 
  30. ^ SOUTH AFRICAN MATHEMATICS FOUNDATION official site: OLYMPIAD HOST CITY ANNOUNCED

External links[edit]