List of Interstate Highways in Washington

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I-5 (big).svgI-82 (big).svgI-182 (big).svg
Markers for I-5, I-82, and I-182

Map of Washington's highways with the Interstates in red
System information
Length: 764.27 mi (1,229.97 km)
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate X (I-X)
US Routes: U.S. Route X (US X)
State: State Route X (SR X)
System links

In the U.S. state of Washington, there are seven roads that are part of the Interstate Highway System, three primary routes and four auxiliary routes, spanning 764.27 miles (1,229.97 km).[n 1] These highways connect every city in the state with a population of over 100,000 (Seattle, Spokane, Tacoma, Vancouver, Bellevue, and Everett)[1] as well as the state capital, Olympia.

Interstate 90 (I-90) is the longest primary Interstate Highway in Washington, which connects Seattle to Spokane and the Idaho border, measuring 297.52 mi (478.81 km), while I-82, connecting the Oregon border city of Umatilla to Elensburg via Yakima, is the shortest at 132.57 mi (213.35 km). The longest auxiliary Interstate Highway in Washington is I-405, a bypass of Seattle through the eastside, at 30.30 mi (48.76 km), and the shortest is I-705, a spur into downtown Tacoma, at 1.50 mi (2.41 km). One route, I-605, has been proposed over the years to form another eastside bypass, however there are no plans to construct this fifth auxiliary route.

Primary Interstate Highways[edit]

Interstate 5 in Seattle

After passage of the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, which formed the Interstate Highway System,[2] the American Association of State Highway Officials had approved I-5 and I-90 across Washington on August 17, 1957.[3] I-82 was approved on October 17, 1957, two months after I-5 and I-90,[4] as part of a 1,102-mile-long (1,773 km) addition to the Interstate Highway System.[5]

Number Length (mi)[6] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed
I‑5 276.62 445.18 I-5 at the Oregon state line BC 99 at the Canada–United States border 1957 current
I‑82 132.57 213.35 I-90 in Ellensburg I-82 at the Oregon state line 1957 current
I‑90 297.52 478.81 SR 519 in Seattle I-90 at the Idaho state line 1957 current

Auxiliary Interstate Highways[edit]

I-182 in Richland

I-205 and I-405 were first codified into Washington State Law in 1970,[7][8] and I-182 and I-705 were codified in 1979.[9][10]

I-705 was completed in 1990,[11] after a series of federal budget cuts,[12] and was the last Interstate Highway to be completed in the state of Washington.[13]

Number Length (mi)[6] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed
I‑182 15.19 24.45 I-82 / US 12 near Richland US 12 / US 395 in Pasco c. 1972 current
I‑205 10.57 17.01 I-205 at the Oregon state line I-5 in Salmon Creek c. 1975 current
I‑405 30.30 48.76 I-5 / SR 518 in Tukwila I-5 / SR 525 in Lynnwood 1964 current
I‑605 0 0 To be determined To be determined proposed
I‑705 1.50 2.41 I-5 / SR 7 in Tacoma Schuster Parkway in Tacoma 1990 current
  Proposed highway

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The mileage is a sum of the lengths listed and cited on this page.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff (2010) (Zip). Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (Report). Washington State Office of Financial Management and U.S. Census Bureau. http://www.ofm.wa.gov/pop/census2010/pl/data/wa_2010_pl94171_city.zip. Retrieved December 24, 2013.
  2. ^ Lewis, Tom (1997). Divided Highways: Building the Interstate Highways, Transforming American Life. New York: Viking. pp. 120–1, 136–7. ISBN 0-670-86627-X. 
  3. ^ Public Roads Administration (August 14, 1957). Official Route Numbering for the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways as Adopted by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Public Roads Administration. http://www.ajfroggie.com/roads/yellowbook/numbering-1957.jpg. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  4. ^ Public Roads Administration (October 17, 1957). Routes to be Added to the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Public Roads Administration. http://www.ajfroggie.com/roads/yellowbook/additions-1957.jpg. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  5. ^ Mooney, Richard E. (October 19, 1957). "1,102 Miles Added To U.S. Roads Plan". The New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 20 January 2014 – via ProQuest. (subscription required (help)). 
  6. ^ a b Finch, Mark (2012). State Highway Log: SR 2 to SR 971 (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/mapsdata/roadway/pdf/HwyLog2012Statewide.pdf. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  7. ^ "47.17.400: State route No. 205". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1970. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  8. ^ "47.17.595: State route No. 405". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1970. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  9. ^ "47.17.372: State route No. 182". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1979. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  10. ^ "47.17.819: State route No. 705". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1979. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  11. ^ Virgin, Bill (October 26, 2006). "At 50, interstates feeling their age". Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Hearst Corporation). 
  12. ^ Harper, Robert (April 16, 1980). "12 State Road Projects Budget Casualties". The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington: Cowles Publishing Company). p. A2. Retrieved January 8, 2011. 
  13. ^ Nelson, Robert T. (March 29, 1998). "In the 6th District, Dicks Keeps Delivering". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 8, 2011. 

External links[edit]