List of Japanese World War II radars

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A list of Japanese radars used during World War II.

Army radar[edit]

Radar used by the Imperial Japanese Army.

Ground-based radar[edit]

  • Ta-Chi 1 Ground-Based Target Tracking Radar Model 1 - SCR-268 1.5 meter band (200 MHz) derivative built in small numbers [1]
  • Ta-Chi 2 Ground-Based Target Tracking Radar Model 2 - SCR-268 1.5 meter band (200 MHz) derivative built in small numbers [1]
  • Ta-Chi 3 Ground-Based Target Tracking Radar Model 3 - (Based on British GL sets captured in Singapore) - 3.75 m (80 MHz) pw = 1 or 2 us, Power = 50 kW, PRF = 1 or 2 kHz (range 40 km), 150 built by Sumitomo Entered service early 1944. Yagi Antenna [1]
  • Ta-Chi 4 Ground-Based Target Tracking Radar Model 4 - SCR-268 1.5 meter band (200 MHz) derivative built in small numbers [1]
  • Type A Bi-static Doppler Interface Detector (High Frequency Warning Device "Ko")
  • Ta-Chi 6 TypeB Fixed Early Warning Device (Fixed Early Warning Device "Otsu") 1943 - 3 meter band (100 MHz) - 60 built
  • Ta-Chi 7 TypeB Mobile Early Warning Device (Mobile Early Warning Device "Otsu") Transportable version of the Ta-Chi 6
  • Ta-Chi 13 Aircraft Guidance System
  • Ta-Chi 18 TypeB Potable Early Warning Device (Portable Early Warning Device "Otsu") - 3 meter band (100 MHz) - 400 built
  • Ta-Chi 20 Fixed Early Warning Device Receiver (for Ta-Chi 6)
  • Ta-Chi 24 Mobil Anti-Aircraft Radar (Japanese Würzburg)
  • Ta-Chi 28 Aircraft Guidance Device
  • Ta-Chi 31 Ground-Based Target Tracking Radar Model 4 Modify
  • Ta-Chi 35 Height finding radar

Airborne radar[edit]

  • Ta-Ki 1 Model 1 Airborne Surveillance Radar
  • Ta-Ki 1 Model 2 Airborne Surveillance Radar
  • Ta-Ki 1 Model 3 Airborne Surveillance Radar
  • Ta-Ki 11 ECM Device
  • Ta-Ki 15 Aircraft Guidance Device Receiver (for Tachi 13)

Shipborne radar[edit]

  • Ta-Se 1 Anti-Surface Radar
  • Ta-Se 2 Anti-Surface Radar

Medium bomber, with control air-to-air missile device[edit]

  • Mitsubishi Ki-67 Hiryu "Peggy" I KAI Go-IA: This experimental modification was for managed air-to-air guided missile evaluations, during 1944–1945.

Guided missiles[edit]

  • Kawasaki Ki-147 I-Go Type1-Ko Air to Surface Radio Guidance Missile
  • Mitsubishi Ki-148 I-Go Type1-Otsu Air to Surface Radio Guidance
  • Missile I-Go Type 1-Hei
  • "Ke-Go" IR Guidance Air to Surface Missile

Navy Radar[edit]

Radar used by the Imperial Japanese Navy

Land-based radar[edit]

Designation Type Antenna Wave
length
Peak
output
Pulse
length
(µS)
PRF
(hz)
Detection
range
single
aircraft
Detection
range
formation
Weight First
operational
Number
built
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 1 "11" Fixed early warning radar Two rows of three dipoles 3 m 5 kW 20 1,000 130 km 250 km 8,700 kg March 1942 30 total
(all marks)
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 1 Mod 1 "11-1" Fixed early warning radar Two rows of three dipoles 3 m 5 kW 20 1,000 130 km 250 km 8,700 kg May 1942
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 1 Mod 2 "11-2" Fixed early warning radar Two rows of three dipoles 3 m 20 kW 40 500 130 km 250 km 8,700 kg May 1943
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 1 Mod 3 "11-3" Fixed early warning radar Two rows of three dipoles 3 m 20 kW 40 500 130 km 250 km 8,700 kg July 1943
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 2 "12-Go" Ground based mobile Dipole array with a mat type reflector 1.5 m 5 kW 10 1,000 50 km 100 km 6,000 kg December 1942 50 total
(all marks)
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 2 Mod 2 "12-Go" Ground based mobile Dipole array with a mat type reflector 2 m 5 kW 10 1,000 50 km 100 km 6,000 kg December 1943
Type 2 Mark 1 Model 2 Mod 3 "12-Go" Ground based mobile Dipole array with a mat type reflector 2 m 5 kW 10 500 150 km effective
300 km max
6,000 kg January 1944
Type 3 Mark 1 Model 1 "11-Go" Shore based medium size radar Two arrays of 5 dipoles 2 m 10 kW 20 500 150 km effective
300 km max
October 1943 unknown
Type 3 Mark 1 Model 3 "13-Go" Multi-purpose portable early
warning radar. Adapted for
submarine use
Dipole array with mat type reflector 2 m 10 kW 10 500 50 km 100 km 110 kg August 1943 1,000
Type 3 Mark 1 Model 4 "14-Go" Ship-bourne long-Range
air search
Four two element yagis 6 m 100 kW 20 250 250 km 360 km to
450 km
30,000 kg May 1945 2 to 5
Type 2 Mark 4 Model 1 S3 Anti-aircraft Fire-Control Radar
(Copy of SCR-268)
2 x 4 dipole array with mat type reflector 1.5 m 13 kW 3 2,000 20 km 40 km 5,000 kg August 1943 50
Type 2 Mark 4 Model 2 S24 Anti-aircraft Fire-Control Radar
(Copy of SCR-268)
4 Yagis 1.5 m 13 kW 3 1,000 20 km 40 km 5,000 kg October 1944 60

[2] [3] [4]

Airborne radar[edit]

Designation Type Antenna Wave
length
Peak
output
Pulse
length
(µS)
PRF
(hz)
Detection
range
single
aircraft
Detection
range
formation
Weight First
operational
Number
built
Type 3 Mark 6 Model 4 (Type H6) Airborne radar Yagi type 2 m 3 kW 10 70 km 100 km 110 kg August 1942 2,000
Type FM-1 Air and surface search radar Yagi Type 2 m 42 kW 70 km 100 km 70 kg September 1944 Experimental only
Type N6 Air and surface search radar Yagi type 1.2 m 2 kW 50 km 70 km 60 kg October 1944 20
Type FM-3 Air and surface search radar Yagi type 2 m 2 kW 50 km 70 km 60 kg June 1945 100
FD-2 Air and surface search radar Yagi type 0.25 m 2 kW <10 km 3 km 70 kg August 1944 [5] 100
  • Type 5 Model 1 Radio Location Night Vision Device

Shipborne radar[edit]

  • Type 2 Mark 2 Model 1 Air Search Radar ("21-Go" Air Search Radar)
  • Type 2 Mark 2 Model 2 Modify 3 Anti-Surface, Fire-assisting Radar for Submarine ("21-Go" Modify 3 Anti-Surface, Fire-assisting Radar)
  • Type 2 Mark 2 Model 2 Modify 4 Anti-Surface, Fire-assisting Radar for Ship ("21-Go" Modify 4 Anti-Surface, Fire-assisting Radar)
  • Type 2 Mark 3 Model 1 Anti-Surface Fire-Control Radar ("31-Go" Anti Surface Fire-Control Radar)
  • Type 2 Mark 3 Model 2 Anti-Surface Fire-Control Radar ("32-Go" Anti Surface Fire-Control Radar)
  • Type 2 Mark 3 Model 3 Anti-Surface Fire-Control Radar ("33-Go" Anti Surface Fire-Control Radar)

Radar-equipped bomber devices for maritime reconnaissance/antisubmarine patrol[edit]

  • Mitsubishi G3M3 (Model 23) "Nell": This bomber for long range capacity, in 1943, was used as a Maritime reconnaissance/Radar aircraft for long range missions and some electronic warfare work in the seas.
  • Mitsubishi G4M1 (Model 11/12) "Betty": From 1942, the G4M of this model was also used for the same purpose as the G3M bomber debt at your maritime long range capacities with sea radar and electronic warfare equipment.
  • Nakajima B5N2/B6N1-2 "Kate"/Tenzan "Jill": In 1944, some torpedo bombers of mentioned types used with antisubmarine, radar detection (with finding radar equipment) and similar purposes in maritime short or medium range missions from carriers or land bases.
  • Aichi E13A1b "Jake" Mark 11B: like model 11A, added Air-Surface radar and other night conversion with radar(E13A1b-S)
  • Kawanishi H6K2,4 and 5 "Mavis" Marks 11,22 and 23: More powerful engines, for ultra long range missions, long range sea radio equipment and air-surface finding radar added.
  • Kawanishi H8K2 "Emily" Mark 12: more potent engines for ultra-long range maritime recon missions, major heavy armament; also long range sea radio equipment and air-surface search radar added
  • Kawanishi E7K2 "Alf" Mark 2: short range hydroplane, was installing magnetic detection equipment and finding surface radar for short range patrol and antisubmarine missions
  • Kyushu Q3W1 Nankai (South Sea): two place version of training aircraft Kyūshū K11W1 Shiragiku, for anti-submarine patrol - was equipped with sea-surface finding antisubmarine sonar (one prototype)
  • Mitsubishi Q2M Taiyō: Advanced Antisubmarine patrol design, derived from Mitsubishi Ki-67 Hiryū "Peggy" Bomber. Was equipped with magnetic antisubmarine search device, air-surface radar and electronic warfare equipment.

Navy air guided missiles[edit]

  • Funryu Type1 Surface to Air Radio Guidance Missile
  • Funryu Type2 Surface to Air Radio Guidance Missile
  • Funryu Type3 Surface to Air Radio Guidance Missile
  • Funryu Type4 Surface to Air Radio Guidance Missile

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Greg Goebel. "Japanese Radar Technology at War". 
  2. ^ Martin Favorite. "Japanese Radar Of World War II". 
  3. ^ Yasuzo Nakagawa (1997). Japanese Radar and Related Weapons. Aegean Park Press. ISBN 0-89412-271-1. 
  4. ^ Japanese Land-Based Radar. U.S. Naval Technical Mission to Japan. 1946. 
  5. ^ but not officially used during the war