List of Jewish communities in the United Kingdom

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This is a list of Jewish communities in the United Kingdom, including synagogues, yeshivot[1] and Hebrew schools. For a list of buildings which are (or were) used as synagogues see List of synagogues in the United Kingdom.

England[edit]

Bedfordshire, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire[edit]

Birmingham and West Midlands[edit]

Bristol, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire[edit]

Cambridge and East Anglia[edit]

Devon and Cornwall[edit]

Dorset, Hampshire and Isle of Wight[edit]

East Midlands[edit]

Essex[edit]

Hertfordshire[edit]

Kent[edit]

Lancashire and Merseyside[edit]

Greater London[edit]

Central London[edit]

City of London and the East End[edit]

East and North East London[edit]

North London[edit]

South and South East London[edit]

West and South West London[edit]

Greater Manchester[edit]

North East[edit]

Oxford[edit]

Surrey[edit]

Sussex[edit]

Swindon and Wiltshire[edit]

Yorkshire[edit]

Northern Ireland[edit]

Scotland[edit]

Wales[edit]

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ A yeshiva (Hebrew: ישיבה) is a centre for the study of Torah and the Talmud in Orthodox Judaism.
  2. ^ "Maidenhead Synagogue". JCR-UK. 28 December 2011. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  3. ^ "Reading Hebrew Congregation". JCR-UK. 29 December 2011. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "Coventry Reform Jewish Community". JCR-UK. 24 December 2011. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  5. ^ Jay Grenby (8 July 2010). "Stevenage to get Liberal synagogue". The Jewish Chronicle (London). Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  6. ^ Jay Grenby (28 April 2011). "Masorti gets shul go-ahead". The Jewish Chronicle (London). Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  7. ^ "Palmers Green and Southgate Synagogue". JCR-UK. 13 December 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2012. 
  8. ^ Stephanie Brickman (29 April 2010). "Rabbi Mark Solomon is new minister in Edinburgh". The Jewish Chronicle (London). Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  9. ^ Cathy Forman (16 November 2012). "Historic Scottish shul acts in self-preservation". The Jewish Chronicle (London). Retrieved 8 December 2012. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]