List of Kansas City Scouts seasons

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Kemper Arena was the home of the Scouts for two seasons.

The Kansas City Scouts was a professional ice hockey team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The team was a member of the Smythe Division of the Campbell Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Scouts joined the NHL in 1974, along with the Washington Capitals.[1] The Scouts played at Kemper Arena. Poor attendance, financial mismanagement, and the team's poor play led the franchise to move to Denver, Colorado in 1976, where it was rechristened the Colorado Rockies.[1] The team would later move to New Jersey, where it found success as the New Jersey Devils, and the team remains there to this day.[1]

The team would finish at the bottom of the Smythe Division for two years, missing the playoffs both times. In fact, the only team to fare worse than the Scouts in the two seasons were its expansion brethren, the Capitals, who set an NHL record by winning only 8 games in the 1974–75 season.[2][3][4]

Table key[edit]

Bold
Won the Stanley Cup
Finish
Final position in division or league standings
GA
Goals against (goals scored by the Scouts' opponents)
GF
Goals for (goals scored by the Scouts)
GP
Number of games played
L
Number of losses
OTL
Number of losses in overtime (since the 1999–00 season)
Pts
Number of points
T
Number of ties
TG
Two-game total goals series
W
Number of wins

Year by year[edit]

Key
Stanley Cup champions Conference champions * Division champions ^ Led league in points ¤
Statistics
NHL season Scouts season Conference Division Regular season Postseason
Finish GP W L T OTL Pts GF GA GP W L T GF GA Result
1974–75 1974–75 Campbell Smythe 5th 80 15 54 11 41 184 328 Did not qualify
1975–76 1975–76 Campbell Smythe 5th 80 12 56 12 36 190 351 Did not qualify


See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c "Kansas City Scouts (1974-1976)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  2. ^ "Washington Capitals (1974-Present)". Sports Ecyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  3. ^ "1974-75 National Hockey League standings". The Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  4. ^ "1975-76 National Hockey League standings". The Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2010-02-17.