List of Lafayette College people

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This is a list of notable people affiliated with Lafayette College.

Notable alumni, faculty, and trustees[edit]

William C. Cattell, President of Lafayette College from 1863 to 1883.
Ralph Cooper Hutchison, President of Lafayette College from 1945 to 1958.
William E. Simon, class of 1952, served as the United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1974–1977.
Fred Morgan Kirby, trustee from 1916–1940, provided funds to establish a Professorship of Civil Rights.

Academics and education[edit]

Business[edit]

  • James Gayley, class of 1876, Managing Director Carnegie Steel Company and first Vice President U.S. Steel 1901-09.
  • Charles Bergstresser, class of 1881, one of the three founders of Dow Jones & Company.
  • Harrison Woodhull Crosby, commercialized the canned tomato.
  • Leslie Freeman Gates, class of 1897, President Chicago Board of Trade 1919–1920.
  • T. Frank Soles, class of 1904, Chairman of the Board of Talon, Inc. - producers of the then patented zipper. Also a trustee and donor of Soles Hall.
  • Fred Morgan Kirby, trustee from 1916–1940, helped found the Woolworth's five and dime store chain.
  • Thomas J. Watson, Trustee & donor, First Chairman & CEO of IBM 1914–56. Computing pioneer, namesake of the Watson Computer.
  • Edward Jesser, class of 1939, former chairman and CEO of Summit Bancorp.
  • Walter E. Hanson, class of 1949, Chairman of KPMG.[1]
  • Michael H. Moskow, class of 1959, CEO and President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  • Thomas J Neff, class of 1959, Chairman Spencer Stuart and Former Lafayette College Trustee.
  • William F. Buechler, class of 1961, Vice Chairman Xerox 1999–2001.
  • Carl G. Anderson Jr., class of 1967, CEO of Arrow International.
  • Charles Golden, class of 1968, CFO of Eli Lilly and Company 1996–2006.
  • Jonathan D. Green, class of 1968, CEO of Rockefeller Group.
  • Alfred A. Piergallini, class of 1968, former CEO Gerber Products and Novartis.
  • Michael F. Weinstein, class of 1970, CEO of Snapple 1997–2000.
  • Stephen D. Pryor, class of 1971, President of ExxonMobil Chemical Company.
  • Roger Newton, class of 1972, Senior Vice President & Director, Esperion Therapeutics, Pfizer Global Research and Development; co-discovered of Lipitor.
  • Neil Levin, class of 1976, former Executive Director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, vice president of Goldman Sachs.
  • James H. Kaplan, class of 1977, CEO of Tai Ping Carpets International.
  • John Donleavy, class of 1978, CEO of Vermont Electric Power Company Inc. (VELCO).
  • Douglas Burcin, class of 1980, Global CEO Havas Health.
  • Angel L. Mendez, class of 1982, Senior Vice President of Customer Value Chain Management at Cisco Systems.
  • James N. Grace, class of 1986, Founder and CEO, InsureMyTrip.com
  • Alan Hoffman, class of 1988, Senior Vice President, Global Public Policy and Government Affairs at PepsiCo. Former Deputy Chief of Staff to the Vice President of the United States Joe Biden and Deputy Assistant to the President.[2]
  • Ian Murray, class of 1997, co-founder of the Vineyard Vines clothing company.

Engineering[edit]

Entertainment[edit]

Government[edit]

Humanities[edit]

  • Frederick Starr, class of 1882, world renowned anthropologist.
  • Barry Wellman, class of 1963, captain undefeated College Bowl team, sociologist, founder of International Network for Social Network Analysis.

Literature and poetry[edit]

Medicine[edit]

Military[edit]

Religion and theology[edit]

Sciences[edit]

  • Rev. Thomas Conrad Porter, class of 1840, discoverer and namesake of several species of plants, among them Desmatodon Porteri, discovered on College Hill.
  • James H. Coffin, Lafayette College Vice President and Treasurer 1846–73, pioneer in meteorology.
  • William Harkness, attended 1854–56, astronomer.
  • Richard William Dickinson Bryan – class of 1869, astronomer and chaplain on the Polaris Expeditions' attempt to reach the North Pole in 1871.
  • William McMurtrie, class of 1871 & first Ph.D. in chemistry awarded at Lafayette (1875), Chief Chemist for the United States Department of Agriculture from 1873–78. President of American Chemical Society in 1900.
  • William Porter Shimer, classes of 1878,1899, discoverer Titanium Carbide.
  • Eugene C. Bingham, Chemistry Professor 1916–39, pioneer in rheology. Namesake of Bingham plastic, fluid, stress as well as the Bingham Medal.
  • S. Donald Stookey, class of 1938, inventor of Corningware earned his master's degree in chemistry in the 1930s;[7]
  • John J. Marchalonis, class of 1962, immunologist discoverer of T-cell receptors.

Sports[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

Presidents of Lafayette College[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former KPMG Chairman Hanson dies at 84". AccountingWEB. AccountingWEB. Retrieved April 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ http://www.marketwatch.com/story/herbalife-appoints-alan-hoffman-executive-vice-president-of-global-corporate-affairs-2014-07-25
  3. ^ Isaiah Dunn Clawson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 25, 2007.
  4. ^ Hester Jr., Tom. "Wesley Lance, 98; in '47 helped craft N.J. Constitution", The Record (Bergen County), August 28, 2007. Accessed August 28, 2007.
  5. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "D. Bennett Mazur, a Professor And New Jersey Legislator, 69", The New York Times, October 13, 1994. Accessed June 15, 2010.
  6. ^ "Former Easton Mayor Fred Ashton dies". The Express-Times. 2013-05-09. Retrieved 2013-06-08. 
  7. ^ "S. Donald Stookey, Scientist, Dies at 99; Among His Inventions Was CorningWare". NY Times. 
  8. ^ College Football Hall of Fame
  9. ^ "Adam J. Cirillo, 72, Dies". New York Times (New York Times). October 3, 1982. Retrieved June 8, 2012. 
  10. ^ "A.K. 'Whip' Buck, 80, part-owner of Phillies". Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved June 8, 2012. 
  11. ^ Teitel, John. "Jon Teitiel's "Forgotten Legends": Lafayette's Tracy Tripucka". Collegehoops.net. Retrieved June 8, 2012. 
  12. ^ "2003.jpg". NHL.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Most Popular". CNN. 
  14. ^ "Home away from home: Hosting minor leaguers". ESPN.com. September 11, 2013. Retrieved September 12, 2013.