List of Lafayette Leopards head football coaches

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Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Head coaches[edit]

Statistics correct as of the end of the 2011 college football season.[4]

# Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs NCs Awards
1 Student coaches 1882–1890 69 35 29 4 .544
2 Wallace Moyle 1891–1892 24 7 16 4 .333
2 P. G. Haskell & H. H. Vincent 1893 9 3 6 0 .333
3 Hugh Janeway & H. H. Vincent 1894 11 5 6 0 .455
4 Parke H. Davis 1895–1897 42 28 12 2 .690 1
5 Samuel B. Newton 1898–1901
1911
42 34 8 0 .810
6 Dave Fultz 1902 11 8 3 0 .727
7 Alfred E. Bull 1903–1907 50 37 10 3 .770
8 George Barclay 1908 10 6 2 2 .700
9 Bob Folwell 1909–1911 22 19 2 1 .886
10 George McCaa 1912–1913 20 8 10 2 .450
11 Wilmer Crowell 1914–1916 30 15 12 2 .552
12 Robert Berryman 1917 8 3 5 0 .375
13 L. A. Cobbett 1918 7 3 4 0 .429
14 Jock Sutherland 1919–1923 43 38 8 2 .813 1
15 Herb McCracken 1924–1935 105 59 40 6 .590 1
16 Ernie Nevers 1938 9 1 8 0 .111
17 Edward Mylin 1937–1942
1946
61 36 24 1 .598
18 Ben Wolfson 1943–1946 21 11 9 1 .548
19 Ivy Williamson 1947–1948 18 13 5 0 .722
20 Maurice J. "Clipper" Smith 1949–1951 25 4 21 0 .160
21 Steve Hokuf 1952–1957 52 25 27 0 .481
22 James McConlogue 1958–1962 45 20 23 2 .467
23 Kenneth Bunn 1963–1966 37 7 28 2 .216
24 Harry Gamble 1967–1970 40 21 19 0 .525
25 Neil Putman 1971–1980 102 44 55 3 .446
26 Bill Russo 1981–1999 205 103 98 4 .512 41 29 1 .585 1
27 Frank Tavani 2000–2011 135 66 69 0 .489 38 36 0 .514 0 3

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[1]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[2]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  2. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  3. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  4. ^ "2010 Lafayette Football Media Guide". goleopards.com. Retrieved 2011-02-20.